Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

Date Postedsort ascending
Three-dimensional view of a magnitude 7.9 earthquake on the Southern San Andreas Fault from an RSQSim simulation. Colors indicate elements that slipped in the earthquake, brighter colors show areas of higher slip. Faults that did not participate in this event are shown in gray. This simulated event is similar in size and location to the 1857 Fort Tejon Earthquake. (Image by University of Southern California / Kevin Milner.)
Shake rattle and code

Tom Jordan and a team from the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) are using the supercomputing resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility, to advance modeling for the study of earthquake risk and how to reduce it.

May 1, 2018
Machine learning techniques can help organizations reduce design time from months to days and slash development costs. (Image by Shutterstock / Photo_works.)
Argonne’s next top model

Designing and manufacturing a new part or product, such as a car engine or wind turbine, can be time-consuming and costly. To combat limitations on these processes, scientists and engineers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory are using cutting-edge machine learning techniques to help organizations reduce design time from months to days and slash development costs.

April 13, 2018
Four of the Department of Energy’s ‘Top 40’ research milestones since 1977 involved Argonne scientists. (Image courtesy of Claire Ballweg/Department of Energy and National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center.)
Reaching the Department of Energy’s ‘Top 40’

The U.S. Department of Energy honors Argonne researchers in top 40 research-paper countdown.

January 3, 2018
Oleo Sponge picks up oil during tests at Argonne. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Nine ways Argonne advanced science and technology in 2017

As 2018 approaches, Argonne looks back at nine cool stories that came out of research projects and collaborations at the laboratory.

December 21, 2017
The EuroMPI/USA 2017 conference, held at Argonne, allowed the founding developers of the Message Passing Interface to celebrate its 25th anniversary. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Pioneers of high-performance computing library reunite

The founding developers of the Message Passing Interface reunited for a one-day symposium celebrating the 25th anniversary of the common language they created to allow highly parallelized and diverse computer processors to communicate.

November 22, 2017
A 3-D rendering shows simulated solar convection realized at different rotation rates. Regions of upflow and downflow are rendered in red and blue, respectively. As rotational influence increases from left (non-rotating) to right (rapidly rotating), convective patterns become increasingly more organized and elongated. Understanding the sun's location along this spectrum represents a major step toward understanding how it sustains a magnetic field. (Image courtesy of Nick Featherstone and Bradley Hindman, University of Colorado Boulder.)
The inner secrets of planets and stars

An INCITE research team, led by Jonathan Aurnou of UCLA, is using Mira to develop advanced models to study magnetic field generation on Earth, Jupiter and the sun at an unprecedented level of detail.

October 31, 2017
This X-band scanning ARM precipitation radar is part of the Southern Great Plains atmospheric observatory, which has hosted nearly 400 field campaigns over the past 25 years. (Image courtesy of the U.S. Department of Energy ARM Climate Research Facility.)
Field of meteorologists’ dreams

With more than 200 instruments, the Southern Great Plains (SGP) atmospheric observatory is the world’s largest and most extensive climate research facility. This year, the site celebrates 25 years of operations, helping scientists gain vital insights into the Earth’s cloud, aerosol and atmospheric processes.

October 25, 2017
The Argonne-led <em>Multiscale Coupled Urban Systems</em> project aims to help city planners better examine complex systems, understand the relationships between them and predict how changes will affect them. The ultimate goal is to help officials identify the best solutions to benefit urban communities. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Exascale and the city

The Argonne-led Multiscale Coupled Urban Systems project will create a computational framework for urban developers and planners to evaluate integrated models of city systems and processes. With this framework, city planners can better examine complex systems, understand the relationships between them and predict how changes will affect them. It can ultimately help officials identify the best solutions to benefit urban communities.

October 16, 2017
Recently, 70 scientists — graduate students, computational scientists, and postdoctoral and early-career researchers — attended the fifth annual Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing (ATPESC) in St. Charles, Illinois. Over two weeks, they learned how to seize opportunities offered by the world’s fastest supercomputers. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Leaning into the supercomputing learning curve

Scientists need to learn how to take advantage of exascale computing. This is the mission of the Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing (ATPESC), which held its annual two-week training workshops over the summer.

October 6, 2017
This shows the HACC cosmology simulation, which combines high spatial and temporal resolution in a large cosmological volume. The high temporal resolution tracks the evolution of structures in great detail and correlates formation histories to the environments in which the structures form. (Image courtesy of Silvio Rizzi and Joe Insley/Argonne Leadership Computing Facility/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Cartography of the cosmos

There are hundreds of billions of stars in our own Milky Way galaxy, interspersed with all manner of matter, from the dark to the sublime. This is the universe that Argonne researcher Salman Habib is trying to reconstruct, structure by structure, combining telescope surveys with next-generation data analysis and simulation techniques currently being primed for exascale computing.

September 25, 2017