Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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From right to left: Greg Martin (SAIC, Inc.) reads and Robert Elwood (Nuclear Consultants and Engineers, Inc.) records the serial number of a vessel containing low-enriched uranium hexafluoride. Martin and Elwood are part of a program that has converted the equivalent of about 20,000 nuclear warheads into fuel that provides electricity in America. (Click image to enlarge.)
Warheads to Plowshares

There’s a decent chance you’re reading this by lights that are powered by the remains of Soviet-era nuclear weapons.

June 1, 2014
"I’m a climate modeler, so we’re trying to pin down what’s happening and what might happen, and for that we take the math approach." -Rao Kotamarthi, Argonne atmospheric scientist
Crowdsource: How do we tackle climate change?

"Crowdsource" asks scientists from varying fields to offer their unique perspectives on a universal problem. Today's question: How do we start tackling climate change?

June 1, 2014
Bill Gasper, an Argonne environmental safety & health coordinator, keeps 100,000 bees in his backyard. Here he's introducing a batch of bees to their new homes.
The secret lives of scientists & engineers: Bill Gasper

This Argonne employee keeps 100,000 bees in his backyard.

June 1, 2014
In the 20th century, scientists began to learn exactly how bad soot is for human health—it accelerates heart failure and burrows into lung tissue, aggravating asthma and respiratory conditions. More recently, scientists have started to realize that carbon particulates play a second unwelcome role: the second largest contributor to climate change.  Click image to enlarge.
The Volcano of a Hundred Thousand Mouths

Tiny carbon particles could play a larger role in climate change than we thought.

June 1, 2014
Argonne is helping Chicago city planners design a new community on the site of an old U.S. steel plant. Models can help designers get a handle on the enormous complexities of travel and transit, electricity and energy use, and infrastructure, for example. Click on the image to enlarge.
A second city in the Second City

Argonne is helping Chicago city planners design a new community on the site of an old U.S. steel plant. Models can help designers get a handle on the enormous complexities of travel and transit, electricity and energy use, and infrastructure, for example.

June 1, 2014
LakeSim is an Argonne-developed tool that merges urban design with scientific analysis to aid in the design of 21st century cities. To address the uncertainty of large-scale planning with so many complex variables, LakeSim creators have prototyped a new platform that seeks to help developers plan at massive scales while anticipating the ability to build in future scenarios such as climate change, improved efficiency in buildings and transportation systems, and increased renewable energy and/or micro-grid applications. Image by Mitch Romanowski & Mary Jo Koelbl/Argonne National Laboratory. (Click image to enlarge).
Designing future cities

LakeSim is an Argonne-developed tool that merges urban design with scientific analysis to aid in the design of 21st century cities. LakeSim uses current architectural and energy data to make forecasts for designers on long-term large-scale developments.

October 7, 2014
The mercury capture system significantly reduces the amount of vaporized mercury produced by gold shops. Pictured here: the approximate cost for the entire system is approximately $500 and uses materials already available in remote locations. Image credit: Habegger et. al. (Click image to enlarge)
Argonne/EPA system captures mercury from air in gold shops

To decrease the accumulation of mercury in the environment, Argonne, in coordination with the Environmental Protection Agency, created a prototype mercury capture system.

December 22, 2014
Researchers are using Argonne's supercomputer Mira to model how explosives detonate, hoping to understand and prevent disasters like this 2005 event, when a semi-truck hauling 35,000 pounds of explosives through the Spanish Fork Canyon in Utah crashed and caught fire, causing a dramatic explosion that left a 30- by-70-foot crater in the highway. Photo courtesy Utah Department of Transportation; click to view larger.
Simulations aimed at safer transport of explosives

In 2005, a semi-truck hauling 35,000 pounds of explosives through the Spanish Fork Canyon in Utah crashed and caught fire, causing a dramatic explosion that left a 30- by-70-foot crater in the highway.

January 7, 2015
On Dec. 11, 2014, Argonne hosted a public lecture titled "Invisible Influence: A Bacterial Guide to Your Health." In the above photo, event attendees supply microbial samples by swabbing their shoulders and scalps. Click image to enlarge.
Taking a look at audience sample results from the 'Invisible Influence' public lecture

A look at audience sample results from the Dec. 11, 2014, public lecture titled "Invisible Influence: A Bacterial Guide to Your Health."

January 12, 2015
Argonne researchers Sibendu Som and Raymond Bair review fuel spray simulations at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. Som and Bair were honored for their work by the Federal Laboratory Consortium. Click image to view larger.
FLC awards researchers for transfer of engine simulation tech

The Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer has honored a group of researchers at Argonne for working with industry to use supercomputers to conduct engine simulations.

February 9, 2015