Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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A simulated sky image of galaxies produced by running Argonne-developed high-performance computing codes and then running a galaxy formation model.  Argonne has collaborated with the University of Illinois, teaming up two supercomputers to perform simulation and data analysis of extremely large-scale, computationally intensive models of the universe. (Image by Lindsey Bleem, Nan Li, and the HACC team/Argonne National Laboratory; Mike Gladders/University of Chicago.)
Big Bang – The Movie

In a new approach to enable scientific breakthroughs, researchers linked together supercomputers at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) and at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

August 24, 2017
Students practice new skills taught in the 2017 coding camp. Participants explored how Argonne scientists use computers in diverse disciplines and were introduced to up-to-date programming tools. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Widening horizons for high schoolers with code

In July, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory hosted a five-day Coding Camp for more than two dozen high school juniors and seniors, teaching new programming skills and how computer science is an integral part of an Argonne researcher’s life.

August 23, 2017
Summer intern William Trevillyan explaind his nanoparticle research with fellow intern Savannah Mitchem. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Young minds take the stage at Argonne

Argonne’s Learning on the Lawn celebration capped 10 weeks of intense discoveries and experimentation for 90 students, led by luminaries from across the laboratory – from nuclear engineers to biologists to experts in exascale computing, systems that will be 50+ times quicker than today’s supercomputers.

August 16, 2017
(Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Big Data meets big healthcare for veterans

Veterans will be the ultimate winners in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs-Department of Energy (DOE) Big Data Science Initiative, a collaborative research effort that casts Argonne National Laboratory in a prominent role.

August 7, 2017
In 2016, Argonne conducted a cultural assessment stemming from a Solar Energy Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Solar PEIS) covering six Southwestern states that Argonne’s Environmental Sciences Division. One of the first studies to portray how Spanish and Mexican settlers of the area related to the land before the U.S. government assumed jurisdiction. Argonne’s charge was to determine which public lands within those states would be technically and environmentally suitable for solar energy development. (Image by K. Wescott/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne uses digital tools to preserve Southwestern cultural heritage

Hollywood’s Indiana Jones gained fame for wielding his pistol and bullwhip, but researchers at Argonne National Laboratory prefer to equip themselves with something far more sophisticated: Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis.

August 2, 2017
An image of the <a href="">Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR)</a> in 1956. The EBWR generated plutonium-based electricity for Argonne's physical plant in 1966. When it was decommissioned the following year by Argonne’s D&D Projects Group, EBWR had established a reputation as the forerunner of many commercial nuclear energy plants. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Nuclear energy comes full circle: Argonne takes part in the start-up and shut down of nuclear reactors

Since the world’s first nuclear chain reaction ignited 75 years ago, Argonne has led the way in developing nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. That legacy comes full circle through Argonne’s Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program, which has led the way in decommissioning nuclear facilities at the lab and around the world for over 40 years.

July 31, 2017
Rick Stevens is  Associate Laboratory Director for Computing, Environment and Life Sciences. Stevens is helping to develop the CANDLE computer architecture on the patient level which is meant to help guide drug treatment choices for tumors based on a much wider assortment of data than currently used. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne goes deep to crack cancer code

Argonne researchers tackling cancer through deep learning with an eye towards the future and exascale computing.

July 28, 2017
Above: 3-D structures of adenine riboswitch RNA calculated using RS3D, a computer program that runs on the supercomputer Mira. RNAs like adenine riboswitch are biological structures found in all human cells; they help control how and when genes are expressed. Some of these structures are linked to cancer and other diseases, and by using RS3D to learn more about them, researchers can better understand how associated diseases evolve, which could lead to better treatments or cures. (Image by Wei Jiang, Argonne National Laboratory; Yuba Bhandari and Yun-Xing Wang, National Cancer Institute.)
Tackling disease in three dimensions: supercomputers help decode RNA structure

In collaboration with staff from the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, researchers at the National Cancer Institute have perfected a technique that accurately computes the 3-D structure of RNA sequences. This method, which relies on a computer program known as RS3D and supercomputer Mira gives researchers studying cancer and other diseases structural insights about associated RNAs that can be used to advance computer-assisted drug design and development.

July 12, 2017
This image is a small portion of an output from the "Q Continuum" cosmology simulation; the full simulation evolves more than half a trillion particles. Exascale systems will further enable researchers to run advanced simulations like this to shed more light on the key ingredients that make up our universe. (Image courtesy of the Hardware/Hybrid Accelerated Cosmology Code (HACC) team.)
How to build software for a computer 50 times faster than anything in the world

Researchers at Argonne are working to create new and adapt existing software technologies to operate at exascale by overcoming challenges found in several key areas, such as resiliency, data reduction, software libraries and the management of memory, power and computational resources.

June 15, 2017
Chick Macal, Jonathan Ozik and Nick Collier (not shown) received the DOE Secretary’s Appreciation Award for their advanced modeling research on how an Ebola outbreak might affect U.S. cities. Pictured above (from left) are: Paul Kearns, Chick Macal, Jonathan Ozik, Joanna M. Livengood and Dmitri Kusnezov. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Department of Energy Secretary recognizes Argonne scientists’ work to fight Ebola, cancer

Two groups of researchers at Argonne earned special awards from the office of the U.S. Secretary of Energy for addressing the global health challenges of Ebola and cancer.

May 18, 2017