Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

Date Postedsort ascending
The researchers integrated X-ray imaging with computer modeling and simulation to characterize zinc oxide nanoparticles, which have attractive electrical properties for use in technologies. Shown above, from left to right, are co-authors Mathew Cherukara, Ross Harder, Haidan Wen and Kiran Sasikumar. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory)
X-ray imaging and computer modeling help map electric properties of nanomaterials

Argonne researchers have developed a new approach for studying piezoelectric materials using ultrafast 3-D X-ray imaging and computer modeling. Their integrated approach, reported in Nano Letters, can help us better understand material behavior and engineer more powerful and energy-efficient technologies.

May 4, 2017
Electrical power plants are often built near bodies of water because the water can be used for cooling, but this proximity to water can also leave plants vulnerable to natural threats, such as flooding. Argonne is helping utilities better manage this dynamic by supplying them with superior climate data and world-class infrastructure planning and decision support. (Image by Shutterstock/leungchopan.)
New effort by Argonne helps power utilities and others better plan for the future

If you’re an electric utility planning a new power plant by a river, it would be nice to know what that river will look like 20 years down the road. Will it be so high that it might flood the new facility? Will the water be so low that it can’t be used to cool the plant? A new initiative by Argonne combines climate data and analysis with infrastructure planning and decision support to offer real help.

May 4, 2017
THEN (1963): Illinois governor Otto Kerner visits the Zero Gradient Synchrotron, which accelerated protons to 12.5 billion electron volts. From left: Lee C. Teng, Particle Accelerator division director, Governor Kerner, and Roger Hildebrand, associate laboratory director for High Energy Physics. Teng and Hildebrand are showing the governor the 110-foot linear accelerator.
Science, then & now

Last year Argonne celebrated its 70th anniversary. Here’s what state-of-the-art science facilities looked like decades ago when Argonne was a fledgling laboratory—and what their descendants look like now.

April 3, 2017
"To take the next step in nanoscience, we need to master reproduction and adaptation. How can we think about making it easier to repair individual units in artificial systems?"
Crowdsource: What will your field of science look like in 50 years?

CROWDSOURCE asks Argonne scientists from different disciplines to each provide a perspective on a complex question. Today we’re asking: What might your field of science look like in 50 years?

April 3, 2017
David Lary, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Texas-Dallas, discusses air particulate sensors that are being integrated in the Argonne-developed Waggle platform to measure and monitor air quality in Chattanooga, Tennessee. (Image by Wes Agresta/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Breakthrough wireless sensing system attracts industry and government agency interest

Top experts in environmental sensing explored existing and potential applications for Waggle and other sensing technologies during a two-day workshop held at Argonne last year. From researching deforestation in the Amazon to improving air quality for manned space missions, attendees revealed unique ways to apply sensing technology to improve our understanding of Earth and human health – and a number of these applications employed Waggle.

February 20, 2017
Students tried their hands at computer coding during “Hour of Code,” a global movement to encourage interest in computer science. Here, Argonne scientist Christopher Peters talks to students at Heritage Grove Middle School. Argonne’s educational programs department arranged for 45 Argonne, Fermilab and UChicago computer scientists to visit 49 different schools across the Chicagoland area. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Hour of Code sends 45 Argonne, Fermilab and UChicago computer scientists to schools

Argonne’s Educational Programs Department coordinated an effort to send computer scientists from Argonne and Fermilab National Laboratory and computer science students from the University of Chicago into schools in the greater Chicago area last December for Hour of Code, a global movement that aims to get everyone, kids to adults, to try computer coding for an hour.

February 3, 2017
Anaerobic bacteria play a central role in cycling carbon and other key elements throughout Earth. A new study shows that the behavior of these microbes is significantly affected by the types of carbon “food” sources available to them. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Study of microbes reveals new insight about Earth’s geology and carbon cycles

Tiny microbes play a big role in cycling carbon and other key elements through our air, water, soil and sediment. Researchers who study these processes at Argonne National Laboratory have discovered that these microbial communities are significantly affected by the types of carbon “food” sources available. Their findings reveal that the type of carbon source affects not only the composition and activity of natural microbial communities, but also in turn the types of mineral products that form in their environment.

January 30, 2017
This manmade peptide, molecular components that link together to from proteins, contains both natural and mirror-image amino acid building blocks. This arrangement, which was modeled using Argonne National Laboratory's Mira supercomputer, gives rise to spirals that twist in opposite directions, a structure not seen in any natural protein. (Image by Vikram K. Mulligan/University of Washington.)
A rising peptide: Supercomputing helps scientists come closer to tailoring drug molecules

With the help of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility’s Mira supercomputer, scientists have successfully designed and verified stable versions of synthetic peptides, components that join together to form proteins.

January 25, 2017
Inside an engine is a harsh place: the intense heat and pressure cause the parts to wear away and break down. But this new coating, which rebuilds itself as soon as it begins to break down, could protect engine parts (and more) for much longer.
9 cool science & tech stories from Argonne in 2016

As 2016 draws to a close, we’re looking back at just a few of the many cool stories that came out of research conducted by Argonne scientists and engineers this year. These discoveries are just a tiny sample of how Argonne researchers help address energy challenges, boost the economy through new discoveries and technologies, and expand scientific knowledge.

December 22, 2016
In September, Argonne hosted over 130 IXPUG participants from around the world for four days of tutorials, workshops and talks aimed at illuminating the still relatively unplumbed world of the Xeon Phi processor. Pictured: Aaron Knoll’s presentation on “Visualization with OSPRay: Research and Production.” (Photo by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory; click to view larger.)
Programmers trade knowledge on Xeon Phi processor at IXPUG conference

In September, Argonne hosted over 130 IXPUG participants from around the world for four days of tutorials, workshops and talks aimed at illuminating the still relatively unplumbed world of the Xeon Phi processor. Users, programmers and systems administrators collaborated to share experiences, trade tips and help one another optimize code for applications ranging from simulating brain tissue to modeling the evolution of the cosmos.

December 21, 2016