Argonne National Laboratory

Science Highlights

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Researchers utilized Argonne's Advanced Photon Source to learn new information on how uranium interacts with magnetite and behaves within the complex chemical environment of the subsurface.
Impurities in natural minerals can affect uranium mobility

Past mining of uranium for use as an energy source and from enrichment and weapons production activities at sites managed by the U.S.

June 17, 2013
White House Women's Leadership Summit on Climate and Energy recognizes Argonne scientists

The White House Women’s Leadership Summit on Climate and Energy is recognizing today a select group of women experts from the public, private, academic and philanthropic sectors who are working to address climate change. Three Argonne researchers – Robin Graham, Leah Guzowski and Ann Schlenker – are part of this select group.

May 23, 2013
Photo courtesy Alfred T. Palmer
Study shows that 'brown carbon' contributes more to climate change than previously believed

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory have recently shown that brown carbon contributes approximately three-fourths as much of a warming effect as black carbon, despite not typically being seen as a principal contributor to climate change.

February 18, 2013
Argonne's Shih-Yew Chen, Senior Environmental Systems Engineer, has been appointed by Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson to serve a three-year term on the EPA Radiation Advisory Committee and Science Advisory Board.
Chen appointed for second term to EPA Advisory Board

Shih-Yew Chen has been appointed to serve a three-year term on the Environmental Protection Agency Radiation Advisory Committee and Science Advisory Board.

October 19, 2012
Argonne researchers studied the process by which Escherichia coli, and other pathogenic bacteria, divide. (Image credit: Rocky Mountain Laboratories, NIAID, NIH)
Argonne, Harvard research team probe mechanisms regulating bacterial cell division

A Midwest Center for Structural Genomics collaborative effort between Argonne and Harvard University researchers has investigated the control of certain cell division hydrolases, called amidases, required for Escherichia coli and other pathogenic bacteria cell division.

October 12, 2012
Above: Fermilab National Laboratory prairie, where Argonne researchers studied carbon dioxide uptake according to differences in soil. (Courtesy of Fermilab Visual Media Services)
Studying photosynthesis and soil respiration interactions in a grassland ecosystem

A research team from Argonne’s Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Science Division investigated the relationships of net ecosystem carbon exchange, soil temperature, and moisture with soil respiration rate and its components at a grassland ecosystem.

September 10, 2012
New computational method aims to lower risk factors in stem cell transplantation

Researchers have developed a new structure-based methodology to model peptide-HLA binding interactions.

August 20, 2012
Finding functionals for fission

Understanding of the fission process is crucial for many areas of science and technology—for example, for deploying safe and efficient advanced nuclear reactors. Accurately estimating the stability of a heavy nucleus against fission in its ground state is, however, a complex mathematical problem involving hundreds of strongly interacting protons and neutrons moving in a splitting nucleus.

April 10, 2012
Understanding the processes controlling the chemical speciation of radionuclide contaminants is key for predicting their fate and transport in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Photo courtesy of Carolina Biological Supply Company.
Microbes influence the movement of uranium contaminants in the environment

Understanding the processes controlling the chemical speciation of radionuclide contaminants is key for predicting their fate and transport in aquatic and terrestrial environments.

January 20, 2012
The structure of NDM-1 shows the protein’s enlarged active site, which lets it latch onto and disable a broad range of antibiotics.
Decoding the proteins behind drug-resistant superbugs

To create the next line of defense against the most drug-resistant pathogens, scientists have determined the structure of a protein that confers drug resistance against our best antibiotics.

December 11, 2011