Argonne National Laboratory

Colloquium Series

The Center for Nanoscale Materials holds a regular biweekly colloquium on alternate Wednesdays at 11:00 a.m. in Bldg. 440, Room A105/106. The goal of the series is to provide a forum for topical multidisciplinary talks in areas of interest to the CNM and also to offer a mechanism for fostering interactions with potential facility users.

Committee Members:

  • Xiao-Min Lin (Chair)
  • Pierre Darancet
  • Ralu Divan
  • Xuedan Ma
  • Elena Rozhkova
  • Jianguo Wen

June 28, 2017
11:00 am
Bldg. 440, A105-106

"Bio-Enigma: High Throughput Screening for Programmable Advanced Materials",  Melik Demirel, Pennsylvania State University.  Host:  Tijana Rajh

Abstract: Recent advances in the nanotechnology of materials combined with parallel improvements in biotechnology and synthetic biology, have demonstrated that more complex biomimetic materials with properties engineered precisely to optimize performance, can be achieved. Specifically, proteins provide unique advantages as advanced materials. For example, proteins can often self-assemble and form network materials with extraordinary properties (PRL’2005) such as extremely high durability or elasticity. More importantly, protein can evolve to new functionalities by gene mutations or duplications, which is unique advantage compared to inorganic materials. Recently, we used a direct correlation between gene duplications and its impact on physical properties to demonstrate that tandem repetition of protein sequences enhances physical properties (PNAS’2016). This method opened the opportunity for the assembly of 2D materials (e.g., graphene, MXene) that are precisely controlled with nm resolution (Carbon’2017) for application in electronic and optical devices. In parallel, we reported the development of a new technique to screen protein evolution based on laser-probing spectroscopy with sub-picosecond resolution (Analyst’2017). Our results demonstrate, for the first time, relative quantification of protein network topology in real time for directed evolution. Hence, combining materials assembly and high-throughput screening, we could answer many fundamental questions in materials research, such as the fundamental long-range order in soft matter as well as development of new tools for advanced materials assembly. Programming physical properties through evolution introduces a new design rule for the understanding of materials design.

July 12, 2017
11:00 am
Bldg. 440, A105-106

Tijana Grove, Virginia Technical Institute, Grove Lab.  Host: Tijana Rajh  

Abstract: Proteins and protein assemblies are the biological workhorses that carry out vital functions in all living organisms. The Grove Lab is interested in translating fundamental knowledge and principles of how proteins operate in nature to the growing field of nanotechnology for the design of multifunctional, dynamic materials. Herein, I will present our most recent work on the repeat-protein biomaterials that self-assemble through the combination of head-to-tail stacking and weak dipole-dipole interactions. These ion and proton conducting materials exhibit anisotropic properties at biologically relevant length-scales, nano to micro, and relevant time scales, miliseconds to seconds.  I will further highlight the tunable anisotropic nano and meso-scale morphologies, which direct the bending, twisting, or curling of material in response to changes in relative humidity and electric potential.  

July 26, 2017
11:00 am
Bldg. 440, A105-106

Li Shi, University of Texas at Austin.  Host:  Sridhar Sadasivam

 

 

August 9, 2017
11:00 am
Bldg. 440, A105-106

Vidya Madhavan, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  Host:  Jeff Guest

 

 

August 23, 2017
11:00 am
Bldg. 440, A105-106

NO Colloquium

August 30, 2017

11:00 am

Bldg. 440, A105-106

Polina Anikeeva, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).  Host:  Elena Shevchenko

September 6, 2017
11:00 am
Bldg. 440, A105-106

Maxim Sukharev, Arizona State University.  Host:  Tal Heilpern

September 20, 2017
11:00 am
Bldg. 440, A105-106

Jeffrey Neaton, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.  Host:  Pierre Darancet

 

October 4, 2017

11:00 am

Bldg. 440, A105-106

Tim Berkelbach, University of Chicago.  Host:  Pierre Darancet

 

October 18, 2017

11:00 am

Bldg. 440, A105-106

Mark Hybertsen, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Center for Functional Nanomaterials.  Host:  Pierre Darancet

November 1, 2017

11:00 am

Bldg. 440, A105-106

 

November 15, 2017

11:00 am

Bldg. 440, A105-106

 

November 29, 2017

11:00 am

Bdlg. 440, A105-106

NO Colloquium

December 13, 2017

11:00 am

Bldg. 440, A105-106