Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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Argonne scientists Badri Narayanan (left) and Subramanian Sankaranarayanan (right) are co-authors of the Science paper, titled “Quantitative 3D Evolution of Colloidal Nanoparticle Oxidation in Solution,” along with the following researchers (not pictured): Yugang Sun, Xiaobing Zuo, Sheng Peng and Ganesh Kamath. (Image by Wes Agresta/Argonne National Laboratory.)
New study reveals the mystery behind the formation of hollowed nanoparticles during metal oxidation

In a newly published Science paper, Argonne and Temple University researchers reveal new knowledge about the behavior of metal nanoparticles when they undergo oxidation, by integrating X-ray imaging and computer modeling and simulation. This knowledge adds to our understanding of fundamental processes like oxidation and corrosion.

April 21, 2017
Cross-section scanning electron microscopy image after hydrogen silsesquioxane patterning, sequential infiltration synthesis and removal of initiated chemical vapor deposition topcoat and organic components. (Image by Hyo Seon Suh / University of Chicago
Self-assembling polymers provide thin nanowire template

In a recent study, a team of researchers from Argonne, the University of Chicago and MIT has developed a new way to create some of the world’s thinnest wires, using a process that could enable mass manufacturing with standard types of equipment.

April 11, 2017
Argonne postdoctoral researcher Ed Barry wrings out a sheet of Oleo Sponge during tests at Argonne. Photo by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory; click to view larger.
Argonne invents reusable sponge that soaks up oil, could revolutionize oil spill and diesel cleanup

Scientists at Argonne have invented a new foam, called Oleo Sponge, that not only easily adsorbs spilled oil from water, but is also reusable and can pull dispersed oil from the entire water column—not just the surface.

March 6, 2017
Entreprenuers embedded at Argonne National Laboratory through the Chain Reaction Innovations program will be surrounded by more than 1,600 scientists and engineers and world-leading R&D tools such as the Advanced Photon Source, above. (Click image to view larger.)
Innovators drawn to Illinois by Argonne National Laboratory’s first embedded entrepreneurship program

In an event with U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and Senator Dick Durbin (D-III) at the University of Chicago’s Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Chain Reaction Innovations, the Midwest’s first entrepreneurship program to embed innovators in a national laboratory, announced the selection of its first members and mentor partners.

December 19, 2016
The NekCEM/Nek5000: Release 4.0: Scalable High-Order Simulation Codes, a set of codes developed by  Argonne researcher Misun Min and Paul Fischer with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,  won a 2016 R&D100 award. (Argonne National Laboratory)
Argonne researchers win three 2016 R&D 100 Awards

Innovative technologies developed by researchers at Argonne and their partners earned three 2016 R&D 100 Awards.

November 8, 2016
The collaboration between Argonne and Kyma Technologies will center on the development of advanced semiconductor devices for application in photovoltaics (pictured), advanced power electronics, optoelectronics and solid-state lighting. (Image by Franco Lucato/Shutterstock)
Argonne and Kyma Technologies win spot in second cohort of Technologist In Residence Program

A collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory and Kyma Technologies focusing on advanced semiconductor devices has earned a spot in the second cohort of DOE’s Technologist In Residence (TIR) Program.

October 6, 2016
A new study by Argonne researchers determined that magnetic skyrmions – small electrically uncharged circular structures with a spiraling magnetic pattern – do get deflected by an applied current, much like a curveball getting deflected by air. (Photo by Mark Lopez, Argonne National Laboratory)
Argonne ahead of the “curve” in magnetic study

In a new study by Argonne researchers, scientists noticed that magnetic skyrmions – small electrically uncharged circular structures with a spiraling magnetic pattern – do get deflected by an applied current, much like a curveball gets deflected by airflow.

September 21, 2016
Former Argonne postdoctoral researcher Diana Berman and Argonne nanoscientist Anirudha Sumant, along with several collaborators, developed a new and inexpensive way to grow pure graphene using a diamond substrate. (Wes Agresta/Argonne National Laboratory)
Diamond proves useful material for growing graphene

A team has developed a method to grow graphene that contains relatively few impurities, and costs less to make, in a shorter time and at lower temperatures compared to the processes widely used to make graphene today.

September 16, 2016
A new study from Argonne National Laboratory has shown water can serve a previously undiscovered role to help micelles coalesce to spontaneously form long fibers. The study could help scientists to understand how light-harvesting molecules are incorporated into the micelle fiber as it assembles, which would be a key step to understanding some forms of artificial photosynthesis. (Image courtesy of Robert Horn/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Water helps assembly of biofibers that could capture sunlight

A new study from Argonne National Laboratory has shown water can serve a previously undiscovered role to help micelles coalesce to spontaneously form long fibers. The study could help scientists to understand how light-harvesting molecules are incorporated into the micelle fiber as it assembles, which would be a key step to understanding some forms of artificial photosynthesis.

September 12, 2016
A $16 million U.S. Department of Energy project to accelerate the design of new materials will make use of several national laboratory supercomputers, including the 10-petaflop Mira computer at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility.
Energy Department to invest $16 million in computer design of materials

The U.S. Department of Energy will invest $16 million over the next four years to accelerate the design of new materials through use of supercomputers. Resources at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Advanced Photon Source and Center for Nanoscale Materials will be leveraged for projects.

August 16, 2016