Argonne National Laboratory

Matthew Tirrell

Deputy Laboratory Director for Science, Chief Research Officer, and Manager of the Laboratory-Directed Research and Development program

Matthew Tirrell is Deputy Laboratory Director for Science, Chief Research Officer, and Manager of the Laboratory-Directed Research and Development program at Argonne National Laboratory. He is responsible for integrating the laboratory’s research and development efforts and science and technology capabilities. He develops and drives strategy to support integrated teams across disciplines in support of Argonne’s strategic initiatives. He assists in reviews of scientific programs and chairs the safety Corrective Action Review Board.

Dr. Tirrell also serves as Founding Pritzker Director of the Institute for Molecular Engineering (IME) at the University of Chicago. Before becoming founding director of the IME in 2011, Dr. Tirrell was dean of engineering at the University of California in Santa Barbara. Previously he served as the Arnold and Barbara Silverman Professor and chair of the Department of Bioengineering at the University of California at Berkeley and as a professor of materials science and engineering and chemical engineering and faculty scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Dr. Tirrell began his academic career at the University of Minnesota, where he was the Shell Distinguished Chair in Chemical Engineering, Earl E. Bakken Professor of Biomedical Engineering, director of the Biomedical Engineering Institute, and head of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science.

He has provided leadership to numerous national and regional organizations, including the Science and Technology Panel of the University of California President’s Council for National Laboratory Administration from 2000 to 2010.

Dr. Tirrell received his bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from Northwestern University and his doctorate in polymer science and engineering from the University of Massachusetts. He has received many honors, including the Polymer Physics Prize of the American Physical Society. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.