Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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When manganese ions (gray) are stripped out of a battery’s cathode (blue), they can react with the battery’s electrolyte near the anode (gold), trapping lithium ions (green/yellow). (Image by Robert Horn/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Scientists identify chemical causes of battery “capacity fade”

Researchers at Argonne identified one of the major culprits in capacity fade of high-energy lithium-ion batteries.

April 25, 2017
Entreprenuers embedded at Argonne National Laboratory through the Chain Reaction Innovations program will be surrounded by more than 1,600 scientists and engineers and world-leading R&D tools such as the Advanced Photon Source, above. (Click image to view larger.)
Innovators drawn to Illinois by Argonne National Laboratory’s first embedded entrepreneurship program

In an event with U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and Senator Dick Durbin (D-III) at the University of Chicago’s Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Chain Reaction Innovations, the Midwest’s first entrepreneurship program to embed innovators in a national laboratory, announced the selection of its first members and mentor partners.

December 19, 2016
The NekCEM/Nek5000: Release 4.0: Scalable High-Order Simulation Codes, a set of codes developed by  Argonne researcher Misun Min and Paul Fischer with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,  won a 2016 R&D100 award. (Argonne National Laboratory)
Argonne researchers win three 2016 R&D 100 Awards

Innovative technologies developed by researchers at Argonne and their partners earned three 2016 R&D 100 Awards.

November 8, 2016
To understand how molecules undergo light-driven chemical transformations, scientists need to be able to follow the atoms and electrons within the energized molecule as it gains and loses energy. In a recent study, a team of researchers at Argonne, Northwestern University and the Technical University of Denmark used the ultrafast high-intensity pulsed X-rays produced by the Linac Coherent Light Source to take molecular snapshots of these molecules. (Illustration by Scott Nychay.)
Seeing energized light-active molecules proves quick work for Argonne scientists

To understand how molecules undergo light-driven chemical transformations, scientists need to be able to follow the atoms and electrons within the energized molecule as it gains and loses energy. In a recent study, a team of researchers at Argonne, Northwestern University and the Technical University of Denmark used the ultrafast high-intensity pulsed X-rays produced by the Linac Coherent Light Source to take molecular snapshots of these molecules.

September 8, 2016
Trying to understand a system of atoms is like herding gnats – the individual atoms are never at rest and are constantly moving and interacting. When it comes to trying to model the properties and behavior of these kinds of systems, scientists use two fundamentally different pictures of reality, one of which is called “statistical” and the other “dynamical.” The two approaches have at times been at odds, but scientists from Argonne recently announced a way to reconcile the two pictures.
Argonne theorists solve a long-standing fundamental problem

Trying to understand a system of atoms is like herding gnats – the individual atoms are never at rest and are constantly moving and interacting. When it comes to trying to model the properties and behavior of these kinds of systems, scientists use two fundamentally different pictures of reality, one of which is called “statistical” and the other “dynamical.” The two approaches have at times been at odds, but Argonne scientists have announced a way to reconcile the two pictures.

August 30, 2016
In one of the collaborations, XL Hybrids Inc. of Boston intends to perform chassis dyno testing, validation and improvement of its XL3 hybrid electric upfit for the diesel Isuzu Reach Class 3 truck in Argonne's high-fidelity testing environment.
Energy Department awards five new Argonne-business collaborations under Small Business Vouchers pilot

The U.S. Department of Energy announced that 43 small businesses will participate in the second round of the Small Business Vouchers pilot. With vouchers in hand, these businesses can better leverage the world-class capabilities of the DOE national laboratories.

August 23, 2016
A transmission electron microscope image taken at Argonne shows the honeycomb structure of the silicon nanowires.  (image by Jiang et al.)
New silicon structures could make better biointerfaces

A team of researchers have engineered silicon particles one-fiftieth the width of a human hair, which could lead to “biointerface” systems designed to make nerve cells fire and heart cells beat.

August 1, 2016
A team led by researchers from the Argonne National Laboratory used the high-intensity, quick-burst X-rays provided by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to look at how the atoms in a molecule change when the molecule is bombarded with X-rays. This schematic shows the dissociation of a xenon difluoride molecule during the X-ray pump/X-ray probe process.
New X-ray method allows scientists to probe molecular explosions

A team led by researchers from Argonne used the high-intensity, quick-burst X-rays provided by the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to look at how the atoms in a molecule change when the molecule is bombarded with X-rays.

June 15, 2016
Reference electrodes provide insights into a battery cell's health. The image above depicts two reference electrodes within a battery cell. This configuration that allows researchers to evaluate a battery's anode and cathode separately at all stages of cycling and aging.
Argonne continues to pave way to improved battery performance testing

Scientists have demonstrated that the placement and type of a tiny measurement device called a reference electrode enhances the quantity and quality of information that can be extracted from lithium-ion battery cells during cycling.

March 31, 2016
One of the small businesses with whom Argonne will collaborate is Transient Plasma Systems (TPS) of Torrance, Calif. TPS has developed a new type of ignition system that allows engines to run leaner or tolerate higher levels of recirculated exhaust gas, thereby increasing efficiency. Pictured is Argonne researcher Michael Pamminger working on a test engine that will be used as part of the TPS-Argonne collaboration.
Three clean tech small businesses matched with Argonne in DOE program

Three clean tech small businesses have received vouchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to be redeemed at Argonne as part of DOE’s Small Business Vouchers Pilot program.

March 17, 2016