Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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Four Argonne researchers appointed fellows of scientific societies

A select group of scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory has been honored as fellows of the American Physical Society and the Electrochemical Society. Physicists Kawtar Hafidi and Michael Carpenter have been appointed as American Physical Society fellows and Materials Scientist Khalil Amine and Chemist Chris Johnson have been elected as Electrochemical Society fellows.

October 20, 2017
Argonne Chemist Stephen Klippenstein has helped discover major chemical pathways that scientists can potentially exploit on a number of levels. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Discovery suggests new significance of unheralded chemical reactions

Argonne and Columbia researchers reveal new significance to a decades-old chemical reaction theory, increasing our understanding of the interaction of gases, relevant to combustion and planetary atmospheres.

August 29, 2017
Researchers at Argonne looked at the dynamics of the transport of certain elements – especially rubidium – at the interface between water and mica, a flat transparent mineral pictured above. (Image by Beth Harvey/Shutterstock.)
Mica provides clue to how water transports minerals

In a new study from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Delaware, chemists have been able to look at the interface between water and muscovite mica, a flat mineral commonly found in granite, soils and many sediments. In particular, the researchers looked at the capture and release of rubidium – a metal closely related to but more easily singled out than common elements like potassium and sodium.

July 13, 2017
Cynthia Jenks will lead Argonne’s Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division.
Cynthia Jenks named director of Argonne’s Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

Argonne has named Cynthia Jenks the next director of the laboratory’s Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division. Jenks currently serves as the assistant director for scientific planning and the director of the Chemical and Biological Sciences Division at Ames Laboratory.

June 8, 2017
A team of researchers, including several physicists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory, discovered that a molecule containing a large atom could act like a molecular “black hole” when exposed to ultrafast laser pulses, sucking in electrons from nearby lighter atoms.  (Image courtesy of DESY). (Image courtesy of DESY.)
The world’s most powerful X-ray laser beam creates ‘molecular black hole’

With the most highly focused power of the world’s most powerful X-ray laser, scientists from a number of institutions around the world – including Argonne National Laboratory – have conducted a new experiment that takes apart molecules electron by electron.

June 8, 2017
Honeywell UOP will examine new materials for converting natural gas to liquid fuels with a synthesis technique called atomic layer deposition. Here, an Argonne researcher prepares to synthesize catalysts using atomic layer deposition. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Honeywell UOP and Argonne seek research collaborations in catalysis under Technologist In Residence program

Researchers at Argonne are collaborating with Honeywell UOP scientists to explore innovative energy and chemicals production.

June 6, 2017
Argonne chemists Dugan Hayes, Lin Chen, and Ryan Hadt have identified a rapid electronic process that could aid the water-splitting reaction in cobalt-containing catalysts.  Cobalt catalysts are relatively inexpensive and could replace more expensive precious metal catalysts in the production of clean energy, most notably solar fuels. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Chemical “dance” of cobalt catalysis could pave way to solar fuels

In a new study, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and Harvard University have been able to see for the first time an especially important chemical step in the process of splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen – the basic reaction at the heart of creating entirely renewable fuels from solar energy.

June 2, 2017
Argonne chemist Max Delferro has developed an unusually active form of vanadium for hydrogenation reactions.  Vanadium an inexpensive common metal that could replace some of the precious metals currently found in catalysts used in these reactions, frequently used in processing of petrochemicals. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne scientists make vanadium into a useful catalyst for hydrogenation

In a new study, Argonne chemist Max Delferro boosted and analyzed the unprecedented catalytic activity of an element called vanadium for hydrogenation – a reaction that is used for making everything from vegetable oils to petrochemical products to vitamins.

May 25, 2017
When manganese ions (gray) are stripped out of a battery’s cathode (blue), they can react with the battery’s electrolyte near the anode (gold), trapping lithium ions (green/yellow). (Image by Robert Horn/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Scientists identify chemical causes of battery “capacity fade”

Researchers at Argonne identified one of the major culprits in capacity fade of high-energy lithium-ion batteries.

April 25, 2017
Entreprenuers embedded at Argonne National Laboratory through the Chain Reaction Innovations program will be surrounded by more than 1,600 scientists and engineers and world-leading R&D tools such as the Advanced Photon Source, above. (Click image to view larger.)
Innovators drawn to Illinois by Argonne National Laboratory’s first embedded entrepreneurship program

In an event with U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and Senator Dick Durbin (D-III) at the University of Chicago’s Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Chain Reaction Innovations, the Midwest’s first entrepreneurship program to embed innovators in a national laboratory, announced the selection of its first members and mentor partners.

December 19, 2016