Argonne National Laboratory

Applied Materials

Argonne's nanocomposite charge drain coatings represent a significant breakthrough in the effort to develop microelectromechanical systems, or MEMS.

Argonne's nanocomposite charge drain coatings represent a significant breakthrough in the effort to develop microelectromechanical systems, or MEMS.

Argonne is a leading technology developer with the advanced manufacturing industry and government sponsors and clients. The emphasis is on applied technology demonstration that often includes design and operation of large-scale facilities based on strategic partnerships with industrial consortia.

Argonne's non-nuclearapplied materials and manufacturing initiative focuses on four areas, detailed below.

  • Nanostructured materials, which includes:
    • Atomic layer deposition (ALD), plasma ALD, and sputtering techniques to synthesize and/ or coat membranes, thin films, and particles;
    • Process design for scaling up mesostructured battery materials, especially cathode materials; and
    • Electrospinning nanorods of targeted compositions, diameters and crystal structures.
  • Sustainable manufacturing, which includes:
    • Reclamation of carbon-fibers and polymeric materials from polymer matrix composites;
    • Separation and recovery of polymeric materials from end-of-life durable goods, such as consumer electronics and vehicles; and
    • Development of efficient alternatives to hightemperature, heat-treating processes such as boriding and nitriding.
  • Biological processing of biomass, including materials for improved conversion and separation efficiency and synthesis of fuels. 
  • Validation of integrated computational materials engineering (ICME)-predicted metallic microstructures.

In the nuclear energy arena, Argonne seeks to increase the fundamental understanding of nuclear energy materials behavior and to apply the resulting insights to the design, synthesis, and testing of materials with improved properties and performance, including accident-tolerant and higher burn-up fuels. Integration of in situ characterization tools with multiscale modeling and simulations will enable the development of high-performance materials for applications in extreme nuclear environments; it will also enable correlation of atomic and nanoscale structure with physical and mechanical properties of nuclear materials with predictive understanding.