Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

Date Postedsort ascending
David Lary, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Texas-Dallas, discusses air particulate sensors that are being integrated in the Argonne-developed Waggle platform to measure and monitor air quality in Chattanooga, Tennessee. (Image by Wes Agresta/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Breakthrough wireless sensing system attracts industry and government agency interest

Top experts in environmental sensing explored existing and potential applications for Waggle and other sensing technologies during a two-day workshop held at Argonne last year. From researching deforestation in the Amazon to improving air quality for manned space missions, attendees revealed unique ways to apply sensing technology to improve our understanding of Earth and human health – and a number of these applications employed Waggle.

February 20, 2017
Inside an engine is a harsh place: the intense heat and pressure cause the parts to wear away and break down. But this new coating, which rebuilds itself as soon as it begins to break down, could protect engine parts (and more) for much longer.
9 cool science & tech stories from Argonne in 2016

As 2016 draws to a close, we’re looking back at just a few of the many cool stories that came out of research conducted by Argonne scientists and engineers this year. These discoveries are just a tiny sample of how Argonne researchers help address energy challenges, boost the economy through new discoveries and technologies, and expand scientific knowledge.

December 22, 2016
Argonne chemist Amanda Youker uses a remote manipulator arm to process and purify radioisotopes in a radiation cell. (Argonne National Laboratory)
Argonne radioisotopes have potential for medical diagnosis and treatment

Using its electron linear accelerator, Argonne enabled two companies to demonstrate new methods for the production of molybdenum-99, the parent isotope of technetium-99m — a medical isotope that could face short supply.

November 14, 2016
Several different remediation processes are available to clean up soil, varying in efficiency, cost and sustainability for specific site conditions. When officials suspect a site is contaminated, they conduct an assessment to determine the pollutant, the extent of contamination and the appropriate method to remediate the soil. (Click image to enlarge.)
Five ways scientists can make soil less dirty

Argonne's Applied Geosciences and Environment Management Program evaluates potentially contaminated sites and applies remediation methods that are both efficient and environmentally friendly by reducing secondary impacts, such as emissions from trucks that transport soil to a treatment facility.

May 23, 2016
Members of the Red Team strategize new ways to attack the systems of teams at the first annual Argonne Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition this weekend. The Red Team included, from left, Mississippi State University student William Showalter, Argonne software engineer Qizhi Zhang, Argonne Cyber Security Operations Manager Matt Kwiatkowski and Evan McBroom, also from Mississippi State.
Cyber Defense Competition draws students to Argonne

More than 75 aspiring cyber defenders from across Illinois and Iowa converged Saturday on Argonne National Laboratory to take on the challenge of the first Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition.

April 26, 2016
How Things Break (And Why Scientists Want to Know)

Breaking things can help scientists answer both the most elemental and the most everyday questions.

March 28, 2016
Many experts are increasingly interested in making electricity a local affair. This idea, useful for both cost savings and for backup power, moves the main source of electricity away from remote large-scale plants to smaller local ones. This approach is called distributed energy.
Personalized energy

The local food movement is booming. Can we do the same for electricity?

March 7, 2016
Sibendu Som (left) and computational scientist Raymond Bair discuss combustion engine simulations conducted on Argonne’s Mira supercomputer, with the aim of gaining further insight into the inner workings of combustion engines. (Click image to view larger.)
The complex chemistry of combustion

Your car is powered by a series of tiny explosions. Scientists think they could make them cleaner and more efficient.

March 7, 2016
Record drought in 2012 sent the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers scrambling to keep the Mississippi, Ohio, and Missouri Rivers open for shipping. Researchers at Argonne are working to help prepare the nation for the drought, heat, and floods of climate change. (Image by the Army Corps of Engineers.)
Weather or not we're ready

Are America’s cities prepared for the drought, heat, and floods of climate change?

March 7, 2016
"I was interested in mathematics and problem solving from a very early age," said Katrin Heitmann, a computational physicist and computational scientist in Argonne's high energy physics department.
Women in STEM careers: Breaking down barriers

Three Argonne researchers share their experiences, why they pursued STEM careers, and how they’re continuing to help the next generation of scientists and engineers to flourish.

March 7, 2016