Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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Several of the college students who spent the summer researching at Argonne were from the University of Chicago. They focused on projects related to nuclear energy, ranging from the nuts and bolts of a reactor to education and non-proliferation. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Demystifying nuclear energy

As part of Argonne’s summer internship program, four college students focused on nuclear energy projects for the laboratory, ranging from the nuts and bolts of a reactor to education and non-proliferation.

October 13, 2017
In these high-speed x-ray images, the 3-D printer is using a laser to melt metal powder, which causes a ‘keyhole’ defect within the cooled material. Researchers at Argonne are studying this process and developing guidelines to avoid such errors. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne efforts accelerate 3-D printing journey

Argonne scientists’ first glimpse inside additive manufacturing process yields important advancements

September 6, 2017
In 2016, Argonne conducted a cultural assessment stemming from a Solar Energy Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Solar PEIS) covering six Southwestern states that Argonne’s Environmental Sciences Division. One of the first studies to portray how Spanish and Mexican settlers of the area related to the land before the U.S. government assumed jurisdiction. Argonne’s charge was to determine which public lands within those states would be technically and environmentally suitable for solar energy development. (Image by K. Wescott/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne uses digital tools to preserve Southwestern cultural heritage

Hollywood’s Indiana Jones gained fame for wielding his pistol and bullwhip, but researchers at Argonne National Laboratory prefer to equip themselves with something far more sophisticated: Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis.

August 2, 2017
An image of the <a href="http://www.ne.anl.gov/About/reactors/lwr3.shtml">Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR)</a> in 1956. The EBWR generated plutonium-based electricity for Argonne's physical plant in 1966. When it was decommissioned the following year by Argonne’s D&D Projects Group, EBWR had established a reputation as the forerunner of many commercial nuclear energy plants. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Nuclear energy comes full circle: Argonne takes part in the start-up and shut down of nuclear reactors

Since the world’s first nuclear chain reaction ignited 75 years ago, Argonne has led the way in developing nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. That legacy comes full circle through Argonne’s Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program, which has led the way in decommissioning nuclear facilities at the lab and around the world for over 40 years.

July 31, 2017
More than 30 students from 19 countries came to Argonne in Mid May to learn the essentials of nuclear security, one of many IAEA courses offered at Argonne on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and technology. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
The global reach of Argonne’s nuclear security training team

For more than 40 years, Argonne has promoted the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and technology through its affiliation with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

May 25, 2017
Chick Macal, Jonathan Ozik and Nick Collier (not shown) received the DOE Secretary’s Appreciation Award for their advanced modeling research on how an Ebola outbreak might affect U.S. cities. Pictured above (from left) are: Paul Kearns, Chick Macal, Jonathan Ozik, Joanna M. Livengood and Dmitri Kusnezov. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Department of Energy Secretary recognizes Argonne scientists’ work to fight Ebola, cancer

Two groups of researchers at Argonne earned special awards from the office of the U.S. Secretary of Energy for addressing the global health challenges of Ebola and cancer.

May 18, 2017
Electrical power plants are often built near bodies of water because the water can be used for cooling, but this proximity to water can also leave plants vulnerable to natural threats, such as flooding. Argonne is helping utilities better manage this dynamic by supplying them with superior climate data and world-class infrastructure planning and decision support. (Image by Shutterstock/leungchopan.)
New effort by Argonne helps power utilities and others better plan for the future

If you’re an electric utility planning a new power plant by a river, it would be nice to know what that river will look like 20 years down the road. Will it be so high that it might flood the new facility? Will the water be so low that it can’t be used to cool the plant? A new initiative by Argonne combines climate data and analysis with infrastructure planning and decision support to offer real help.

May 4, 2017
15-year-old high school student Jocelyn Murray helped lead her team in solving three of the four cyber security puzzles created by Jennifer Fowler of Argonne’s Cyber Operations, Analysis and Research group. Fascinated by computers and solving cyber puzzles, Murray and her team were invited to learn about cyber defense culture at this past weekend’s second annual Argonne Cyber Defense Competition. (Image by Jonathan Berecz / Wakefield Memorial High School.)
High-schooler solves college-level security puzzle from Argonne, sparks interest in career

15-year-old Jocelyn Murray and her classmates solved a series of college-level cyber puzzles. This weekend they had a front row seat to watch college-level competitors who are older and more experienced defend their networks from constant attack.

April 5, 2017
The world is dotted with research reactors that run on highly enriched uranium. For nearly four decades, scientists and engineers at Argonne National Laboratory have been leading the global effort to convert such reactors to run on low-enriched uranium instead.
Into Kazakhstan to Convert a Reactor

The world is dotted with research reactors that run on highly enriched uranium. Argonne engineers are traveling the world to convert them one by one.

April 3, 2017
Linda Gaines is an Argonne transportation systems analyst.
Ask a scientist: When is it more efficient to turn off my car instead of idling?

Click to find out what science says. Hint: It’s a matter of seconds.

April 3, 2017