Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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More than 30 students from 19 countries came to Argonne in Mid May to learn the essentials of nuclear security, one of many IAEA courses offered at Argonne on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and technology. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
The global reach of Argonne’s nuclear security training team

For more than 40 years, Argonne has promoted the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and technology through its affiliation with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

May 25, 2017
Chick Macal, Jonathan Ozik and Nick Collier (not shown) received the DOE Secretary’s Appreciation Award for their advanced modeling research on how an Ebola outbreak might affect U.S. cities. Pictured above (from left) are: Paul Kearns, Chick Macal, Jonathan Ozik, Joanna M. Livengood and Dmitri Kusnezov. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Department of Energy Secretary recognizes Argonne scientists’ work to fight Ebola, cancer

Two groups of researchers at Argonne earned special awards from the office of the U.S. Secretary of Energy for addressing the global health challenges of Ebola and cancer.

May 18, 2017
Electrical power plants are often built near bodies of water because the water can be used for cooling, but this proximity to water can also leave plants vulnerable to natural threats, such as flooding. Argonne is helping utilities better manage this dynamic by supplying them with superior climate data and world-class infrastructure planning and decision support. (Image by Shutterstock/leungchopan.)
New effort by Argonne helps power utilities and others better plan for the future

If you’re an electric utility planning a new power plant by a river, it would be nice to know what that river will look like 20 years down the road. Will it be so high that it might flood the new facility? Will the water be so low that it can’t be used to cool the plant? A new initiative by Argonne combines climate data and analysis with infrastructure planning and decision support to offer real help.

May 4, 2017
15-year-old high school student Jocelyn Murray helped lead her team in solving three of the four cyber security puzzles created by Jennifer Fowler of Argonne’s Cyber Operations, Analysis and Research group. Fascinated by computers and solving cyber puzzles, Murray and her team were invited to learn about cyber defense culture at this past weekend’s second annual Argonne Cyber Defense Competition. (Image by Jonathan Berecz / Wakefield Memorial High School.)
High-schooler solves college-level security puzzle from Argonne, sparks interest in career

15-year-old Jocelyn Murray and her classmates solved a series of college-level cyber puzzles. This weekend they had a front row seat to watch college-level competitors who are older and more experienced defend their networks from constant attack.

April 5, 2017
The world is dotted with research reactors that run on highly enriched uranium. For nearly four decades, scientists and engineers at Argonne National Laboratory have been leading the global effort to convert such reactors to run on low-enriched uranium instead.
Into Kazakhstan to Convert a Reactor

The world is dotted with research reactors that run on highly enriched uranium. Argonne engineers are traveling the world to convert them one by one.

April 3, 2017
Linda Gaines is an Argonne transportation systems analyst.
Ask a scientist: When is it more efficient to turn off my car instead of idling?

Click to find out what science says. Hint: It’s a matter of seconds.

April 3, 2017
 It created the first human-made controlled nuclear chain reaction exactly 75 years ago. (Click to view infographic larger.)
7 things you might not know about the world's first nuclear reactor

It was built in a squash court under the University of Chicago football stands.

April 3, 2017
David Lary, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Texas-Dallas, discusses air particulate sensors that are being integrated in the Argonne-developed Waggle platform to measure and monitor air quality in Chattanooga, Tennessee. (Image by Wes Agresta/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Breakthrough wireless sensing system attracts industry and government agency interest

Top experts in environmental sensing explored existing and potential applications for Waggle and other sensing technologies during a two-day workshop held at Argonne last year. From researching deforestation in the Amazon to improving air quality for manned space missions, attendees revealed unique ways to apply sensing technology to improve our understanding of Earth and human health – and a number of these applications employed Waggle.

February 20, 2017
Inside an engine is a harsh place: the intense heat and pressure cause the parts to wear away and break down. But this new coating, which rebuilds itself as soon as it begins to break down, could protect engine parts (and more) for much longer.
9 cool science & tech stories from Argonne in 2016

As 2016 draws to a close, we’re looking back at just a few of the many cool stories that came out of research conducted by Argonne scientists and engineers this year. These discoveries are just a tiny sample of how Argonne researchers help address energy challenges, boost the economy through new discoveries and technologies, and expand scientific knowledge.

December 22, 2016
Argonne chemist Amanda Youker uses a remote manipulator arm to process and purify radioisotopes in a radiation cell. (Argonne National Laboratory)
Argonne radioisotopes have potential for medical diagnosis and treatment

Using its electron linear accelerator, Argonne enabled two companies to demonstrate new methods for the production of molybdenum-99, the parent isotope of technetium-99m — a medical isotope that could face short supply.

November 14, 2016