Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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Many experts are increasingly interested in making electricity a local affair. This idea, useful for both cost savings and for backup power, moves the main source of electricity away from remote large-scale plants to smaller local ones. This approach is called distributed energy.
Personalized energy

The local food movement is booming. Can we do the same for electricity?

March 7, 2016
Sibendu Som (left) and computational scientist Raymond Bair discuss combustion engine simulations conducted on Argonne’s Mira supercomputer, with the aim of gaining further insight into the inner workings of combustion engines. (Click image to view larger.)
The complex chemistry of combustion

Your car is powered by a series of tiny explosions. Scientists think they could make them cleaner and more efficient.

March 7, 2016
Argonne engineer Aaron Greco works to improve the reliability of wind turbines using tribology. (Click to view larger.)
7 things you might not know about tribology

Objects rubbing together cause friction which eventually wears down one or the other surface. Finding ways to reduce this friction—in your knees, in an engine, or in factory machinery—can help scientists develop stronger materials that last longer and slide easier, which increases efficiency.

March 7, 2016
Researchers used intense X-rays at the Advanced Photon Source to study how the bombardier beetle sprays hot, caustic chemicals when threatened. Top: The bombardier beetle can aim its noxious spray from two separate rear glands. Bottom: This colored scanning electron microscope image shows the structure of the two glands. To protect the beetle’s insides, the chambers holding the chemicals are lined with a thick layer of protective cuticle, shown in brown. Areas with less cuticle—and more flexibility—are shown in blue. The white arrow identifies the reaction chamber; the purple arrow shows the junction between the reaction chamber and the exit channel; and the yellow arrow points out the exit channel dorsal membrane. (Click to view larger.)
10 cool science and technology stories from Argonne in 2015

As 2015 draws to a close, we’re looking back at some of the coolest stories that came out of research conducted by Argonne scientists and engineers this year.

December 23, 2015
Engineer Jason Harper works in the Argonne Electric Vehicle-Smart Grid Interoperability Center, developing technologies and standards for charging electric vehicles around the world
New sister Interoperability Center opens in Europe

The European Interoperability Center for Electric Vehicles and Smart Grids opened last month to make sure all of these cars have a standard plug and equipment that can work anywhere. The new center is a sister location to the U.S. Electric Vehicle-Smart Grid Interoperability Center at Argonne.

December 11, 2015
Elena Timofeeva is a principal chemist at Argonne. Her work focuses on functional nanomaterials and nanofluids.
Argonne scientists receive recognition for clean energy research

Midwest Energy News has named Elena Timofeeva and Leah Guzowski to its inaugural 40 under 40 list.

October 21, 2015
Argonne researchers Sibendu Som and Raymond Bair review fuel spray simulations at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. Som and Bair were honored for their work by the Federal Laboratory Consortium. Click image to view larger.
FLC awards researchers for transfer of engine simulation tech

The Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer has honored a group of researchers at Argonne for working with industry to use supercomputers to conduct engine simulations.

February 9, 2015
Autonomie R14 now available

A new version of Argonne's award-winning Autonomie tool is now available

January 8, 2015
Researchers from Argonne National Laboratory modeled several scenarios to add more solar power to the electric grid, using real-world data from the southwestern power utility Arizona Public Service Company. Credit: Shutterstock. (Click image to enlarge)
Argonne researchers use real-world data to model the effect of more solar on the grid

As we add more electricity from renewable sources that can only make electricity when the sun shines or the wind blows, researchers from Argonne have been modeling the power system to help utilities adjust their operations to make sure they can maintain high levels of electricity reliability.

October 10, 2014
Argonne National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy have released a case study examining the environmental and economic costs and benefits of propane school buses.
Can propane school buses save money and provide other benefits?

School districts across the country are looking for ways to save money and be more environmentally sustainable.

October 1, 2014