Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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Students from Stony Brook University visited Argonne with research professor Nils Feege to test a prototype of a magnetic cloak — a crucial piece of equipment for a next-generation particle collider — at Argonne’s 4-Tesla Magnet Facility. From left to right: Thomas Krahulik, Nils Feege, Rourke Sekelsky, Joshua LaBounty and Stacy Karthas. (Image by Nils Feege.)
A road trip to test a magnetic cloak at Argonne National Laboratory

In December, five students from Stony Brook University in New York and their research professor loaded a prototype of a magnetic cloak into an SUV and set off for Argonne National Laboratory, nearly 900 miles away.

February 24, 2017
Cooling technique helps researchers “target” a major component for a new collider

Researchers at Argonne have recently developed a new ultra-low-friction sliding contact mechanism that uses chilled water to remove heat from a key component of a next-generation collider.

December 2, 2016
Building project managers and scientific leads confer at the site of a new clean room under construction at Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the lab will enable scientists and engineers to build extremely sensitive detectors — such as those capable of detecting light from the early days of the universe. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Building a room clean enough to make sensors to find light from the birth of the universe

Work is underway at Argonne on an expansion of its “clean room.” The new lab will be specially suited for building parts for ultra-sensitive detectors — such as those to carry out improved X-ray research, or for the South Pole Telescope to search for light from the early days of the universe.

October 17, 2016
How Things Break (And Why Scientists Want to Know)

Breaking things can help scientists answer both the most elemental and the most everyday questions.

March 28, 2016
"I was interested in mathematics and problem solving from a very early age," said Katrin Heitmann, a computational physicist and computational scientist in Argonne's high energy physics department.
Women in STEM careers: Breaking down barriers

Three Argonne researchers share their experiences, why they pursued STEM careers, and how they’re continuing to help the next generation of scientists and engineers to flourish.

March 7, 2016
This series shows the evolution of the universe as simulated by a run called the Q Continuum, performed on the Titan supercomputer and led by Argonne physicist Katrin Heitmann. These images give an impression of the detail in the matter distribution in the simulation. At first the matter is very uniform, but over time gravity acts on the dark matter, which begins to clump more and more, and in the clumps, galaxies form. Image by Heitmann et. al. (Click to view larger.)
Researchers model birth of universe in one of largest cosmological simulations ever run

Researchers are sifting through an avalanche of data produced by one of the largest cosmological simulations ever performed, led by scientists at Argonne.

October 29, 2015
Argonne mentors stand beside students from Chicago-area schools. Argonne’s ACT-SO STEM Research and Mentoring Program provides mentors and facilities to help students prepare their research for ACT-SO’s STEM competition. Photo by Justin H.S. Breaux; click to view larger.
Argonne mentors students for the next generation of scientists

On May 6, the accomplishments of seventeen Chicago-area high school students that had been mentored by staff at Argonne National Laboratory were honored for their performance at this year’s Afro-Academic, Cultural, Technological and Scientific Olympics (ACT-SO) competition, held at the College of DuPage in March.

May 28, 2015
At the South Pole Telescope, scientists measure cosmic radiation still traveling across space from the early days of the universe - using superconductors. Image by Daniel Luong-Van, National Science Foundation. Click to enlarge.
Seeing Back in Time with Superconductors

For Argonne physicist Clarence Chang, looking backward in time to the earliest ages of the universe is all in a day’s work.

June 1, 2014
Andrey Elagin (left), postdoctoral scholar at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago, and Matthew Wetstein, the Grainger Postdoctoral Fellow at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago, adjust the optics in the Large Area Picosecond Photodetector testing facility. The facility uses extremely short laser pulses to precisely measure the time resolution of the photodetectors. Click to enlarge.
Collaboration between varied organizations develops larger, more precise photodetectors for the market

Scientific particle detectors, medical imaging devices and cargo scanners with higher resolutions and cheaper price tags could become a reality, thanks to a three-way collaboration between industry, universities and U.S. national laboratories.

November 5, 2013
At the South Pole Telescope, scientists measure cosmic radiation still traveling across space from the early days of the universe. Image by Daniel Luong-Van, National Science Foundation. Click to enlarge.
South Pole Telescope helps Argonne scientists study earliest ages of the universe

For Argonne physicist Clarence Chang, looking backward in time to the earliest ages of the universe is all in a day’s work.

October 28, 2013