Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

Date Postedsort ascending
This image depicts the selective functionalization of methane molecules, a chemical process that makes them more technologically desirable. The methane molecules are shown as one gray carbon atom connected to four white hydrogen atoms. The orange crystals at bottom represent the metal-organic frameworks in which the reaction takes place. (Image by Xuan Zhang, Northwestern University.)
Uncovering a missing link from methane to methanol

Microscopic crystalline structures called metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) may provide a way to solve one of the biggest problems in methane functionalization catalysis, an economically important chemical process. Now, a research team from Argonne and Northwestern University have demonstrated a new way to activate methane with MOFs.

June 22, 2018
Argonne scientists started with a new hetero-structure consisting of a reconfigurable artificial-spin-ice nanostructure on top of a superconducting thin film.
Taming tornadoes at the nanoscale

Argonne scientists help design a reconfigurable superconductor with nanoscale magnets.

June 12, 2018
Argonne materials scientist Samuel Bader is one of only three recipients of the 2018 Magnetism Award and Néel Medal from the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne scientist wins international award for magnetism research

Samuel Bader, a longtime materials scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory, is one of three researchers to earn the 2018 prestigious Magnetism Award and Néel Medal of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics.

May 4, 2018
This shows the reaction mechanism for converting hydrogen fluoride (HF) impurity from the electrolyte into lithium fluoride (LiF) in the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) with release of hydrogen gas (H<sub>2</sub>). The SEI layer is shown on a substrate of gold (Au) atoms, which serves as a simplified model system. Scientists determined this mechanism using advanced computational methods (density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations). (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Battery’s hidden layer revealed

An international team led by Argonne National Laboratory makes breakthrough in understanding the chemistry of the microscopically thin layer that forms between the liquid electrolyte and solid electrode in lithium-ion batteries. The results are being used in improving the layer and better predicting battery lifetime.

April 17, 2018
For the first time, Argonne scientists and other collaborators observed the mirror-like physics of the superconductor-insulator transition. They now see it operates exactly as expected. (Image by Shutterstock / ktsdesign.)
Mirror, Mirror

The mirror-like physics of the superconductor-insulator transition operates exactly as expected. Scientists know this to be true following the observation of a remarkable phenomenon, the existence of which was predicted three decades ago but that had eluded experimental detection until now. The observation confirms that two fundamental quantum states, superconductivity and superinsulation, both arise in mirror-like images of each other.

April 6, 2018
Argonne’s Suzanne te Velthuis and Stephan Rosenkranz have been named fellows of the Neutron Scattering Society of America (NSSA). (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Doing the neutron dance

Two materials scientists, Suzanne te Velthuis and Stephan Rosenkranz, have been named fellows of the Neutron Scattering Society of America (NSSA).

April 4, 2018
Argonne team members (from left to right): Rajeev Assary, Cong Liu, Badri Narayanan, Anh Ngo and Larry Curtiss. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Out of thin air

Argonne researchers conducted basic science computational studies as part of a collaboration with researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago to design a “beyond-lithium-ion” battery cell that operates by running on air over many charge and discharge cycles. The design offers energy storage capacity about three times that of a lithium-ion battery, with significant potential for further improvements.

March 21, 2018
Argonne and Brookhaven researchers observed two kinds of defects forming in individual nanowires, depicted here. These nanowires are smaller in diameter than a human hair. (Image by Megan Hill/Northwestern University.)
Scientists have a new way to gauge the growth of nanowires

In a new study, researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne and Brookhaven National Laboratories observed the formation of two kinds of defects in individual nanowires, which are smaller in diameter than a human hair.

March 19, 2018
Argonne researchers and their collaborators sought to understand what happens when an electron is injected into water. They found that the electron binds with the water; however, its binding energy is much smaller than previously thought. (Image courtesy of Peter Allen/Institute for Molecular Engineering.)
Electrons in the water

Scientists have been able to experimentally measure the electron affinity of water, determining what happens to an electron when it is injected into water. The result has importance for photochemical cells and may force scientists to a reexamine certain theories about electronic binding energy.

January 19, 2018
In a newly discovered twist, Argonne scientists and collaborators found that palladium nanoparticles can repair atomic dislocations in their crystal structure. This self-healing behavior could be worth exploring in other materials. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
On the rebound

New research from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory and Stanford University has found that palladium nanoparticles can repair atomic dislocations in their crystal structure, potentially leading to other advances in material science.

January 19, 2018