Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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Four Argonne researchers appointed fellows of scientific societies

A select group of scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory has been honored as fellows of the American Physical Society and the Electrochemical Society. Physicists Kawtar Hafidi and Michael Carpenter have been appointed as American Physical Society fellows and Materials Scientist Khalil Amine and Chemist Chris Johnson have been elected as Electrochemical Society fellows.

October 20, 2017
This shows the synthetic purple membrane assembly developed by Elena Rozhkova and fellow Argonne researchers. The assembly, which includes nanodiscs, titanium dioxide and platinum nanoparticles, can transform sunlight into hydrogen fuel. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Purple power: Synthetic ‘purple membranes’ transform sunlight to hydrogen fuel

Argonne researchers have found a new way to produce solar fuels by developing “synthetic purple membranes.” These membranes involve an assembly of lipid nanodiscs, man-made proteins, and semiconducting nanoparticles that, when taken together, can transform sunlight into hydrogen fuel.

October 12, 2017
Argonne, the University of Chicago and Fermilab are launching an intellectual hub called the Chicago Quantum Exchange to advance academic, industrial and governmental efforts in the science and engineering of quantum information. Above: An illustration of a blinking quantum dot in its 'on’ state. (Image courtesy of Nicholas Brawand).
Chicago Quantum Exchange to create technologically transformative ecosystem

The University of Chicago is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to launch an intellectual hub for advancing academic, industrial and governmental efforts in the science and engineering of quantum information.

June 20, 2017
Materials scientists at Argonne National Laboratory synthesized single crystals of a metallic trilayer nickelate compound, which shows similarities to a technologically valuable class of materials called high-temperature superconductors – and with the right ingredients, could potentially become one. Above: The crystal structure of such a compound. (Image credit: Zhang et. al, published in <em>Nature Physics</em>.)
Nickel for thought: Compound shows potential for high-temperature superconductivity

Argonne researchers have identified a nickel oxide compound as an unconventional but promising candidate material for high-temperature superconductivity. The project combined crystal growth, X-ray spectroscopy and computational theory.

June 16, 2017
Honeywell UOP will examine new materials for converting natural gas to liquid fuels with a synthesis technique called atomic layer deposition. Here, an Argonne researcher prepares to synthesize catalysts using atomic layer deposition. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Honeywell UOP and Argonne seek research collaborations in catalysis under Technologist In Residence program

Researchers at Argonne are collaborating with Honeywell UOP scientists to explore innovative energy and chemicals production.

June 6, 2017
Argonne will work with ThermoAura Inc., of Colonie, NY, to improve the performance of commercially manufactured thermoelectric materials, one of seven new partnerships announced through the Department of Energy’s Small Business Voucher program. Higher performing thermoelectrics could improve the efficiency of air conditioning systems. (Image by Shutterstock/Artur Bogacki)
Seven small businesses to collaborate with Argonne to solve technical challenges

Seven small businesses have been selected to collaborate with researchers at Argonne to address technical challenges as part of DOE’s Small Business Vouchers Program.

May 31, 2017
Argonne materials scientist Andrew Ulvestad examines a sample at Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Special X-ray technique allows scientists to see 3-D deformations

In a new study published last Friday in Science, researchers at Argonne used an X-ray scattering technique called Bragg coherent diffraction imaging to reconstruct in 3-D the size and shape of grain defects. These defects create imperfections in the lattice of atoms inside a grain that can give rise to interesting material properties and effects.

May 23, 2017
Two Argonne physicists offered a way to mathematically describe a particular physics phenomenon called a phase transition in a system out of equilibrium (that is, with energy moving through it) by using imaginary numbers. The illustration relates the phase transition to the change between mathematical Mobius transformations (a, b, and c). The theory of out-of-equilibrium physics is a long-sought goal in the field, and could eventually help us design better electronics. (Image courtesy of Vinokur/Galda/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Study offers new theoretical approach to describing non-equilibrium phase transitions

Two physicists at Argonne offered a way to mathematically describe a particular physics phenomenon called a phase transition in a system out of equilibrium. Such phenomena are central in physics, and understanding how they occur has been a long-held and vexing goal; their behavior and related effects are key to unlocking possibilities for new electronics and other next-generation technologies.

April 26, 2017
Snapshots of the 3-D structure of iron nanoparticles in the course of the oxidation process, captured through large-scale reactive molecular dynamic simulations. These simulations enhance our understanding of processes like oxidation and corrosion, and build a foundation for developing integrated imaging techniques to control or manipulate these types of reactions. (Image by Yugang Sun, Xiaobing Zuo, Subramanian Sankaranarayanan, Sheng Peng, Badri Narayanan and Ganesh Kamath, Argonne National Laboratory/Temple University.)
New study reveals the mystery behind the formation of hollowed nanoparticles during metal oxidation

In a newly published Science paper, Argonne and Temple University researchers by integrated X-ray imaging and computer modeling and simulation to reveal new knowledge about the behavior of metal nanoparticles when they undergo oxidation. This knowledge adds to our understanding of fundamental processes like oxidation and corrosion.

April 21, 2017
Cross-section scanning electron microscopy image after hydrogen silsesquioxane patterning, sequential infiltration synthesis and removal of initiated chemical vapor deposition topcoat and organic components. (Image by Hyo Seon Suh / University of Chicago
Self-assembling polymers provide thin nanowire template

In a recent study, a team of researchers from Argonne, the University of Chicago and MIT has developed a new way to create some of the world’s thinnest wires, using a process that could enable mass manufacturing with standard types of equipment.

April 11, 2017