Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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Argonne scientists will be studying the physics of unusual atomic nuclei with this world-class gamma ray spectrometer. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Welcome back, GRETINA

GRETINA, a state-of-the-art gamma ray spectrometer, is back at Argonne and will be contributing to our knowledge of nuclear physics, the structure of subatomic nuclei and other ingredients of the universe.

December 6, 2017
The U.S. Department of Energy funded four projects, representing more than $1 million, for Argonne’s Nuclear Engineering division. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Department of Energy supports Argonne nuclear technologies

This fall, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Rick Perry announced nearly $4.7 million in funding for the department’s Argonne National Laboratory across 16 projects in three divisions. Four of those TCF awards, representing more than $1 million in funds, are slated for Argonne’s Nuclear Engineering division.

December 5, 2017
The EuroMPI/USA 2017 conference, held at Argonne, allowed the founding developers of the Message Passing Interface to celebrate its 25th anniversary. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Pioneers of high-performance computing library reunite

The founding developers of the Message Passing Interface reunited for a one-day symposium celebrating the 25th anniversary of the common language they created to allow highly parallelized and diverse computer processors to communicate.

November 22, 2017
Meltem Urgun Demirtas, an environmental engineer in Argonne’s Energy Systems Division, is the principal investigator in a break-through biogas technology that could change the waste-to-fuel industry. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Renewable opportunities abundant in Illinois

Huge amounts of organic waste are generated each year in the United States, according to a

November 10, 2017
Researchers at Argonne and other national laboratories are seeking to identify and fill gaps hindering the commercialization of extreme fast charging for plug-in electric vehicles. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office recently announced its commitment to this goal via a $15 million funding opportunity. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Closing the gap: Argonne, partners putting charge into EV battery technology

Widespread demand for electric vehicles could hinge on batteries that can be charged in minutes instead of hours, and researchers at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory are

November 7, 2017
Argonne National Laboratory scientist Sergey Chemerisov (left) works with Ian Hamilton (right), CEO of Atlas Energy Systems and a member of Chain Reaction Innovation to set up a system to generate ionized gas from the Van de Graff Accelerator at Argonne. This system coverts gas to energy through a patented novel technology for use in portable battery systems. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Atlas wins ocean-themed competition

Startup in Argonne’s Chain Reaction Innovations wins international pitch competition Ocean Exchange.

November 7, 2017
A snapshot of silicene (shown in yellow), a 2-D material made up of silicon atoms, as it grows on iridium substrate (shown in red). The image was taken from a molecular dynamics simulation, which Argonne researchers used to predict the growth and evolution of silicene. (Image courtesy of Joseph Insley / Argonne National Laboratory.)
The flat and the curious

Argonne researchers have simulated the growth of the 2-D material silicene. Their work, published in Nanoscale, delivers new and useful insights on the material’s properties and behavior and offers a predictive model for other researchers studying 2-D materials.

November 6, 2017
A 3-D rendering shows simulated solar convection realized at different rotation rates. Regions of upflow and downflow are rendered in red and blue, respectively. As rotational influence increases from left (non-rotating) to right (rapidly rotating), convective patterns become increasingly more organized and elongated. Understanding the sun's location along this spectrum represents a major step toward understanding how it sustains a magnetic field. (Image courtesy of Nick Featherstone and Bradley Hindman, University of Colorado Boulder.)
The inner secrets of planets and stars

An INCITE research team, led by Jonathan Aurnou of UCLA, is using Mira to develop advanced models to study magnetic field generation on Earth, Jupiter and the sun at an unprecedented level of detail.

October 31, 2017
This X-band scanning ARM precipitation radar is part of the Southern Great Plains atmospheric observatory, which has hosted nearly 400 field campaigns over the past 25 years. (Image courtesy of the U.S. Department of Energy ARM Climate Research Facility.)
Field of meteorologists’ dreams

With more than 200 instruments, the Southern Great Plains (SGP) atmospheric observatory is the world’s largest and most extensive climate research facility. This year, the site celebrates 25 years of operations, helping scientists gain vital insights into the Earth’s cloud, aerosol and atmospheric processes.

October 25, 2017
Argonne scientists have determined the molecular structure of this protein complex — an insight that could lead to new biomedical strategies for overcoming pathogenic bacteria that cause infectious diseases. This representation shows the neutralized complex of the CdiA toxin (purple and beige) with the CdiI immunity protein (orange and pink) and the elongation factor EF-Tu (grey and green). (Image courtesy of Karolina Michalska / Argonne National Laboratory.)
Hacking the bacterial social network

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) scientists have determined the molecular structures of a highly specialized set of proteins that are used by a strain of E. coli bacteria to communicate and defend their turf.

October 24, 2017