Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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Anthony DiChiara, physicist in the X-ray Science division, uses funds from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to create rapid and “container-free” experiments enabling researchers to use less material and decrease costs. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Wall of sound

Argonne researchers improve upon acoustic levitation by using less material, lowering costs and paving the way for more research in the field.

July 10, 2018
Electrons in some oxides can experience an “unconventional slowing down” of their response to a light pulse, according to Argonne material scientists and their collaborators. This surprising behavior may result in useful properties related to magnetism, conductivity or even superconductivity. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Electrons slowing down at critical moments

Argonne scientists have determined that electrons in some oxides can experience an “unconventional slowing down” of their response to a light pulse. This behavior may result in potentially useful properties related to magnetism, conductivity or even superconductivity.

July 6, 2018
Researcher Kevin Beyer explained the nuances of Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source to two Aqsa students. Along with 14 other schools, the Aqsa students took part in Argonne’s Exemplary Student Research Program in February. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne’s Exemplary Student Research Program inspires girls to join the sciences

Now in its seventh year, this educational program encourages high school students to work with Argonne scientists. In 2018, students from Aqsa School investigated lithium-ion batteries at Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source.

April 27, 2018
Argonne chemists Ted Krause and Max Delferro (pictured) focus much of their work on single-site catalysts because of the promise they show for both high activity and product selectivity. Their work has led to several U.S. patent applications. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Cracking the catalytic code

In a variety of research programs, Argonne experts are finding ways to make cheaper and more efficient the manufacture of products derived from shale gas deposits and identifying new routes to higher-performance.

April 24, 2018
Argonne scientists are helping to solve the challenge of hypersonic flight by unraveling the complexities of combustion, which will propel aircraft to those speeds. (Image by Shutterstock / Andrey Yurlov.)
Going with the hypersonic flow

Argonne researcher Alan Kastengren is using X-rays to delve deeply into complexity challenges related to supersonic combustion in hypersonic vehicles, one of the most complex flow problems in science. Working through Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source and National Security Programs, he is helping clients like the Air Force Research Laboratory improve performance of the scramjet combustors that power hypersonic jets.

April 23, 2018
The Velociprobe team at the Advanced Photon Source includes (from left to right): Zhonghou Cai, Curt Preissner (in back), Junjing Deng, Christian Roehrig and Tamjid Sheikh Mashrafi. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Advanced Photon Source commissions “Velociprobe” for faster, higher-resolution X-ray microscopy

To address challenges and opportunities from Argonne’s Upgrade of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the laboratory commissioned the “Velociprobe,” a new scanning tool to explore the limits of fast, high-resolution X-ray microscopy. The instrument, which will be used at the APS before the Upgrade is completed, was built under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

March 19, 2018
Argonne scientists are using extremely powerful x-rays to understand the physics of the 3-D printing process. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Printing on patrol

What if our military could dramatically reduce the amount of materials and equipment held on the front lines by printing only what they need? Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory are aiming to do this with new advances in 3-D printing.

January 15, 2018
Oleo Sponge picks up oil during tests at Argonne. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Nine ways Argonne advanced science and technology in 2017

As 2018 approaches, Argonne looks back at nine cool stories that came out of research projects and collaborations at the laboratory.

December 21, 2017
In these high-speed x-ray images, the 3-D printer is using a laser to melt metal powder, which causes a ‘keyhole’ defect within the cooled material. Researchers at Argonne are studying this process and developing guidelines to avoid such errors. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne efforts accelerate 3-D printing journey

Argonne scientists’ first glimpse inside additive manufacturing process yields important advancements

September 6, 2017
Image of the protein tryptophan synthase created using diffraction data from Argonne's Advanced Photon Source. The inhibitor binds between the reaction sites in the protein, represented here by the orange and blue pockets. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
"Monkey wrench" molecule jams tuberculosis protein

Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory were part of a recent discovery of a new molecule that attacks tuberculosis-causing bacteria by cutting off its production of a chemical necessary for its survival.

August 4, 2017