Feature Stories

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Argonne materials scientist Seungbum Hong studies the internal structure of piezoelectric materials. These are certain types of crystals that generate electricity when you squeeze them.
Batteries not needed?

The day is coming when heartbeats power pacemakers, sneakers charge cell phones during a jog, and tires power their own pressure sensors as they rotate.

September 13, 2013
Argonne biologist Rosemarie Wilton works on ways to stabilize antibodies, which tend to degrade over time.
Antibody builders

Because antibodies are naturally so good at recognizing a host of different pathogens, Argonne biologist Rosemarie Wilton has spent much of her career working to better stabilize antibodies and prevent them from degrading over time.

September 13, 2013
How your smartphone got so smart

The breakthroughs that let you fit a computer in your pocket, and where we're going from here.

September 13, 2013
Amanda Petford-Long is Director of Argonne's Nanscience and Technology Division as well as the lab's Center for Nanoscale Materials.
Center for Nanoscale Materials Director Petford-Long chats with 'Science in Parliament'

Amanda Petford-Long, Director of Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials, answers questions for the Summer 2013 issue of Science in Parliament.

July 23, 2013
Computational modeling produces both prospects for better catalysts and beautiful images, like this model of a platinum catalyst interacting with oxygen atoms (red) and hydrogen atoms (white). Image by Rees Rankin, Center for Nanoscale Materials.
7 things you may not know about catalysis

Catalysts are one of those things that few people think much about, beyond perhaps in high school chemistry, but they make the world tick.

December 14, 2011
Argonne nanoscientist Tijana Rajh holds a strip of material created from titanium dioxide nanotubes.
Batteries get a quick charge with new anode technology

A breakthrough in components for next-generation batteries could come from special materials that transform their structure to perform better over time.

November 2, 2011
A specialized piece of glass called a luminescent solar concentrator can intensify incoming light. The green and orange rings are produced by its fluorescence.
New solar cell technology gives light waves “amnesia”

For years, scientists have dealt with the problem of trying to increase the efficiency and drive down the cost of solar cells. Now researchers have hit upon a new idea—trying to give the light collected by solar cells a bit of "amnesia."

September 26, 2011
A team of researchers at Argonne has developed the new "multilayer Laue lens," that will let scientists study the nanoscale in greater detail than ever before. From left to right: Bing Shi, Lahsen Assoufid, Brian Stephenson, Jörg Maser, Chian Liu, Lisa Gades. Not pictured: Al Macrander.
Argonne-pioneered X-ray lens to aid nanomaterials research

A team of researchers at Argonne National Laboratory has developed the new "multilayer Laue lens". This lens focuses high-energy X-rays so tightly they can detect objects as small as 15 nanometers in size and is in principle capable of focusing to well below 10 nanometers.

August 15, 2011
Inorganic surface ligands enable facile electron transport between quantum dots and opened novel opportunities for using nanostructures in solar cells.
New inorganic semiconductor layers hold promise for solar energy

A team of researchers from the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory has demonstrated a method that could produce cheaper semiconductor layers for solar cells.

June 1, 2011
Yugang Sun
Argonne Researcher named top five materials scientist of 2000s

Argonne scientist Yugang Sun has been recognized as the one of the five top materials scientists in the world over the past decade, according to a new ranking recently released by Thomson Reuters.

April 1, 2011