Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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Argonne researchers have created skyrmions – ordered regions of magnetic spins – by using a spiraling focused ion beam. (Illustration by Robert Horn / Argonne National Laboratory.)
Skyrmions created with a special spiral

Researchers at Argonne have found a way to control the creation of special textured surfaces, called skyrmions, in magnetically ordered materials.

April 5, 2017
Click to view infographic larger.
Four fantastic materials found at Argonne

New materials are the seeds for new technologies. Here are four discoveries with never-before-seen properties that could lead to new devices, innovations, or breakthroughs.

April 3, 2017
Scientists have used a new X-ray diffraction technique called Bragg single-angle ptychography to get a clear picture of how planes of atoms shift and squeeze under stress. (Image by Robert Horn/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Single-angle ptychography allows 3D imaging of stressed materials

Scientists have used a new X-ray diffraction technique called Bragg single-angle ptychography to get a clear picture of how planes of atoms shift and squeeze under stress.

March 21, 2017
In a new study, Argonne scientists have discovered a way to confine the behavior of electrons by using extremely high magnetic fields. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Electrons "puddle" under high magnetic fields, study reveals

In a new study, researchers used extremely high magnetic fields — equivalent to those found in the center of neutron stars — to alter electronic behavior. By observing the change in the behavior of these electrons, scientists may be able to gain an enriched understanding of material behavior.

January 3, 2017
Inside an engine is a harsh place: the intense heat and pressure cause the parts to wear away and break down. But this new coating, which rebuilds itself as soon as it begins to break down, could protect engine parts (and more) for much longer.
9 cool science & tech stories from Argonne in 2016

As 2016 draws to a close, we’re looking back at just a few of the many cool stories that came out of research conducted by Argonne scientists and engineers this year. These discoveries are just a tiny sample of how Argonne researchers help address energy challenges, boost the economy through new discoveries and technologies, and expand scientific knowledge.

December 22, 2016
This image of a quasicrystal lattice shows the unique symmetric but never repeating pattern of its components.  The colors correspond to the orientation of the magnetic polarization of each edge. (Image by Amanda Petford-Long, Argonne National Laboratory.)
Energy cascades in quasicrystals trigger an avalanche of discovery

In a new study from Argonne National Laboratory, scientists looked at networks of magnetic material patterned into the unique and quite beautiful geometries of quasi-crystals to see how the nature of the non-repeating patterns lead to the emergence of unusual energetic effects.

December 12, 2016
The Argonne research team that has pioneered the use of machine learning tools in 2-D material modeling. (Image by Wes Agresta/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Machine learning enables predictive modeling of 2-D materials

In a study published in The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, a team of researchers led by Argonne computational scientist Subramanian Sankaranarayanan described their use of machine learning tools to create the first atomic-level model that accurately predicts the thermal properties of stanene, a 2-D material made up of a one-atom-thick sheet of tin.

December 7, 2016
Building project managers and scientific leads confer at the site of a new clean room under construction at Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the lab will enable scientists and engineers to build extremely sensitive detectors — such as those capable of detecting light from the early days of the universe. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Building a room clean enough to make sensors to find light from the birth of the universe

Work is underway at Argonne on an expansion of its “clean room.” The new lab will be specially suited for building parts for ultra-sensitive detectors — such as those to carry out improved X-ray research, or for the South Pole Telescope to search for light from the early days of the universe.

October 17, 2016
No one has yet imaged an entire brain down to the level of individual cells; but Bobby Kasthuri has a plan to do just that using intensive computing and imaging resources at Argonne. Above is a simulation showing an unusual configuration of a neuron: one axon (blue) connected to multiple points on a dendrite (green). The total image is smaller than the diameter of a single human hair. (Click to view larger.)
Adventures of the first neuroscientist at Argonne

Bobby Kasthuri wants to map the human brain. Unlike most brain researchers, he wants a literal map: a 3D picture of every single neuron inside a brain. All 100 billion of them — or maybe 80 billion. Or maybe 120 billion?

March 16, 2016
INCREASE members visited Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source to network and learn how to submit competitive proposals for their research. (Click image to enlarge.)
Keys to Access: Argonne-INCREASE partnership opens doors to collaboration

Argonne hosted 34 members of the Interdisciplinary Consortium for Research and Education and Access in Science and Engineering (INCREASE) group for a two day workshop.

October 27, 2015