Feature Stories

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Argonne mentors stand beside students from Chicago-area schools. Argonne’s ACT-SO STEM Research and Mentoring Program provides mentors and facilities to help students prepare their research for ACT-SO’s STEM competition. Photo by Justin H.S. Breaux; click to view larger.
Argonne mentors students for the next generation of scientists

On May 6, the accomplishments of seventeen Chicago-area high school students that had been mentored by staff at Argonne National Laboratory were honored for their performance at this year’s Afro-Academic, Cultural, Technological and Scientific Olympics (ACT-SO) competition, held at the College of DuPage in March.

May 28, 2015
Argonne's Energy Sciences Building has been certified LEED Gold. (Click image to view larger.)
Argonne Energy Sciences Building achieves LEED Gold

Argonne’s Energy Sciences Building has been awarded Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold rating by the U.S. Green Building Council.

May 21, 2015
Lab-Corps is a U.S. Department of Energy program aimed at improving the rate of commercialization of technologies created at national labs that are in line with the mission of DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. (Click image to view larger.)
Two Argonne teams win pitch competition, advance to national Lab-Corps training program

On April 17, the judges chose these two technologies from a pool of six finalists to participate in the national Lab-Corps training program.

April 24, 2015
Argonne microbial ecologist Jack Gilbert (foreground) and Sparkling Pointe winemaker Gilles Martin take samples of the microbes living on the leaves, flowers, soil and roots of grapevines as part of a study on how microbes affect plant health. (Photo courtesy Kristin West (FMC Corporation) and Jack Gilbert. Click to enlarge.)
Researchers study grapevine microbiota

A new study of the microbes growing in and around grapevines, led by researchers from Argonne National Laboratory, surveyed microbes on the plants and their influence on the plants' health.

March 26, 2015
In a simulated collision, two cells deform as they bounce off each other. Many small such collisions can lead to a group of cells moving together in tandem, as modeled by researchers at Argonne National Laboratory. Image by Igor Aronson.
Modeling how cells move together could inspire self-healing materials

A paper published in Nature’s Scientific Reports by a team led by Argonne physicist Igor Aronson modeled the motion of cells moving together. This may help scientists design new technologies inspired by nature, such as self-healing materials in batteries and other devices.

March 18, 2015
Argonne director Peter Littlewood testified before the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources on March 17, 2015.
Congressional Testimony: Peter Littlewood

On March 17, 2015, Argonne director Peter Littlewood testified before the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources on the future of the U.S. electric grid.

March 18, 2015
Scientists at Argonne proposed theoretical evidence for a new superconducting fluctuation, which may lead to a way of measuring the exact temperature at which superconductivity kicks in and shed light on the poorly understood properties of superconducting materials above this temperature. Above: Sharp peaks are visible as the temperature nears Tc, the temperature at which superconductivity kicks in. Illustration courtesy Alexey Galda. (Click image to enlarge.)
Study proposes new way to measure superconducting fluctuations

A study published last month by researchers at Argonne provides theoretical evidence for a new effect that may lead to a way of measuring the exact temperature at which superconductivity kicks in and shed light on the poorly understood properties of superconducting materials above this temperature.

March 10, 2015
Argonne researcher Yuelin Li holds a sample holder containing a single gold nanorod in water. Li and colleagues discovered that nanorods melt in three distinct phases when grouped in large ensembles. Their research will inform the creation of next-generation technologies such as water purification systems, battery materials and cancer research. Photo by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory. (Click to enlarge.)
Shape-shifting groups of nanorods release heat differently

Researchers at Argonne have revealed previously unobserved behaviors that show how the transfer of heat at the nanoscale causes nanoparticles to change shape in groups.

February 18, 2015
Argonne researchers Sibendu Som and Raymond Bair review fuel spray simulations at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. Som and Bair were honored for their work by the Federal Laboratory Consortium. Click image to view larger.
FLC awards researchers for transfer of engine simulation tech

The Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer has honored a group of researchers at Argonne for working with industry to use supercomputers to conduct engine simulations.

February 9, 2015
On Dec. 11, 2014, Argonne hosted a public lecture titled "Invisible Influence: A Bacterial Guide to Your Health." In the above photo, event attendees supply microbial samples by swabbing their shoulders and scalps. Click image to enlarge.
Taking a look at audience sample results from the 'Invisible Influence' public lecture

A look at audience sample results from the Dec. 11, 2014, public lecture titled "Invisible Influence: A Bacterial Guide to Your Health."

January 12, 2015