Feature Stories

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Argonne researchers Pete Beckman and Rajesh Sankaran test the components of their Waggle operating system, which sits inside an Array of Things node. The Array of Things is a network of hundreds of sophisticated sensing and computational devices to be deployed throughout Chicago; the effort is led by Argonne’s Charlie Catlett and the Computation Institute’s Urban Center for Computation and Data at the University of Chicago. Photo by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory. (Click to enlarge.)
New sensor array changes the data collection game

Researchers at Argonne have developed a platform that outfits researchers with a next-generation data collection experience.

March 5, 2015
Argonne researcher Yuelin Li holds a sample holder containing a single gold nanorod in water. Li and colleagues discovered that nanorods melt in three distinct phases when grouped in large ensembles. Their research will inform the creation of next-generation technologies such as water purification systems, battery materials and cancer research. Photo by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory. (Click to enlarge.)
Shape-shifting groups of nanorods release heat differently

Researchers at Argonne have revealed previously unobserved behaviors that show how the transfer of heat at the nanoscale causes nanoparticles to change shape in groups.

February 18, 2015
Argonne researchers Sibendu Som and Raymond Bair review fuel spray simulations at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. Som and Bair were honored for their work by the Federal Laboratory Consortium. Click image to view larger.
FLC awards researchers for transfer of engine simulation tech

The Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer has honored a group of researchers at Argonne for working with industry to use supercomputers to conduct engine simulations.

February 9, 2015
On Dec. 11, 2014, Argonne hosted a public lecture titled "Invisible Influence: A Bacterial Guide to Your Health." In the above photo, event attendees supply microbial samples by swabbing their shoulders and scalps. Click image to enlarge.
Taking a look at audience sample results from the 'Invisible Influence' public lecture

A look at audience sample results from the Dec. 11, 2014, public lecture titled "Invisible Influence: A Bacterial Guide to Your Health."

January 12, 2015
Researchers are using Argonne's supercomputer Mira to model how explosives detonate, hoping to understand and prevent disasters like this 2005 event, when a semi-truck hauling 35,000 pounds of explosives through the Spanish Fork Canyon in Utah crashed and caught fire, causing a dramatic explosion that left a 30- by-70-foot crater in the highway. Photo courtesy Utah Department of Transportation; click to view larger.
Simulations aimed at safer transport of explosives

In 2005, a semi-truck hauling 35,000 pounds of explosives through the Spanish Fork Canyon in Utah crashed and caught fire, causing a dramatic explosion that left a 30- by-70-foot crater in the highway.

January 7, 2015
The mercury capture system significantly reduces the amount of vaporized mercury produced by gold shops. Pictured here: the approximate cost for the entire system is approximately $500 and uses materials already available in remote locations. Image credit: Habegger et. al. (Click image to enlarge)
Argonne/EPA system captures mercury from air in gold shops

To decrease the accumulation of mercury in the environment, Argonne, in coordination with the Environmental Protection Agency, created a prototype mercury capture system.

December 22, 2014
A team of scientists clarified the definition of the Earth's most abundant mineral – a high-density form of magnesium iron silicate, now called Bridgmanite – using Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source. Above: Scanning electron microscope image of a bridgmanite-akimotoite aggregate. The backscatter electron image reveals an aggregate of submicrometer-sized crystals of bridgmanite and akimotoite enclosed in (Mg,Fe)SiO3 glass and within a Tenham shock-melt vein. Image credit: Tschauner et et al, Science (2014). (Click image to enlarge)
Earth’s most abundant mineral finally has a name

An ancient meteorite and high-energy X-rays have helped scientists conclude a half century of effort to find, identify and characterize a mineral that makes up 38 percent of the Earth.

December 11, 2014
The Chicago Innovation Exchange campus is located on 53rd St. on the University of Chicago campus. The facilities include a coffee bar, classrooms and open work and event areas. The space can support the collaborations of up to 300 innovators, mentors and partners surrounded by a community where restaurants, retail stores, hotels and bars all serve as areas to sit, collaborate and innovate. (Click image to enlarge)
Manufacturing serendipity: Chicago Innovation Exchange enhancing regional vitality through researcher/investor collaboration

The Chicago Innovation Exchange leverages the combined expertise of Argonne, Fermilab and the University of Chicago to create and support small businesses originating from discoveries and ideas developed in the lab.

December 1, 2014
Set in Northern Illinois University’s 10,000-seat Convocation Center, STEMfest features dozens of museums, educators, national labs and corporations presenting hundreds of displays, activities and performances, all aimed at educating, entertaining and inspiring the thousands of students and adults in attendance. (Click image to enlarge)
Argonne joins in the fun at Northern Illinois University’s popular STEMfest

Northern Illinois University's fifth annual STEMfest was held on Oct. 18, and Argonne National Laboratory once again joined in the fun.

November 4, 2014
Researchers from Argonne National Laboratory modeled several scenarios to add more solar power to the electric grid, using real-world data from the southwestern power utility Arizona Public Service Company. Credit: Shutterstock. (Click image to enlarge)
Argonne researchers use real-world data to model the effect of more solar on the grid

As we add more electricity from renewable sources that can only make electricity when the sun shines or the wind blows, researchers from Argonne have been modeling the power system to help utilities adjust their operations to make sure they can maintain high levels of electricity reliability.

October 10, 2014