Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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The researchers integrated X-ray imaging with computer modeling and simulation to characterize zinc oxide nanoparticles, which have attractive electrical properties for use in technologies. Shown above, from left to right, are co-authors Mathew Cherukara, Ross Harder, Haidan Wen and Kiran Sasikumar. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory)
X-ray imaging and computer modeling help map electric properties of nanomaterials

Argonne researchers have developed a new approach for studying piezoelectric materials using ultrafast 3-D X-ray imaging and computer modeling. Their integrated approach, reported in Nano Letters, can help us better understand material behavior and engineer more powerful and energy-efficient technologies.

May 4, 2017
Electrical power plants are often built near bodies of water because the water can be used for cooling, but this proximity to water can also leave plants vulnerable to natural threats, such as flooding. Argonne is helping utilities better manage this dynamic by supplying them with superior climate data and world-class infrastructure planning and decision support. (Image by Shutterstock/leungchopan.)
New effort by Argonne helps power utilities and others better plan for the future

If you’re an electric utility planning a new power plant by a river, it would be nice to know what that river will look like 20 years down the road. Will it be so high that it might flood the new facility? Will the water be so low that it can’t be used to cool the plant? A new initiative by Argonne combines climate data and analysis with infrastructure planning and decision support to offer real help.

May 4, 2017
Keeping cyber attackers at bay, the team from the University of Illinois at Chicago won Argonne’s second annual Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition.
2017 Cyber Defense Competition enthralls crowd at Argonne

Argonne’s second annual Cyber Defense Competition kept spectators on the edge of their seat. New dynamics added suspense to this daylong educational event for college and high school students.

April 14, 2017
Argonne researchers have created skyrmions – ordered regions of magnetic spins – by using a spiraling focused ion beam. (Illustration by Robert Horn / Argonne National Laboratory.)
Skyrmions created with a special spiral

Researchers at Argonne have found a way to control the creation of special textured surfaces, called skyrmions, in magnetically ordered materials.

April 5, 2017
15-year-old high school student Jocelyn Murray helped lead her team in solving three of the four cyber security puzzles created by Jennifer Fowler of Argonne’s Cyber Operations, Analysis and Research group. Fascinated by computers and solving cyber puzzles, Murray and her team were invited to learn about cyber defense culture at this past weekend’s second annual Argonne Cyber Defense Competition. (Image by Jonathan Berecz / Wakefield Memorial High School.)
High-schooler solves college-level security puzzle from Argonne, sparks interest in career

15-year-old Jocelyn Murray and her classmates solved a series of college-level cyber puzzles. This weekend they had a front row seat to watch college-level competitors who are older and more experienced defend their networks from constant attack.

April 5, 2017
THEN (1963): Illinois governor Otto Kerner visits the Zero Gradient Synchrotron, which accelerated protons to 12.5 billion electron volts. From left: Lee C. Teng, Particle Accelerator division director, Governor Kerner, and Roger Hildebrand, associate laboratory director for High Energy Physics. Teng and Hildebrand are showing the governor the 110-foot linear accelerator.
Science, then & now

Last year Argonne celebrated its 70th anniversary. Here’s what state-of-the-art science facilities looked like decades ago when Argonne was a fledgling laboratory—and what their descendants look like now.

April 3, 2017
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Four fantastic materials found at Argonne

New materials are the seeds for new technologies. Here are four discoveries with never-before-seen properties that could lead to new devices, innovations, or breakthroughs.

April 3, 2017
By day, Argonne physicist Robert Wiringa studies nuclear physics - what's happening inside the nuclei of atoms.
The secret lives of scientists & engineers: Robert Wiringa

In this series, meet researchers from Argonne with unusual hobbies and interests. Today we're interviewing Robert Wiringa, a physicist who describes the behavior of atoms—and has collected more than 2,000 model ships.

April 3, 2017
Lisa Goodenough, astrophysicist
Science in the 1000 most common words: nuclear engineering & Dark Matter

Webcomic author Randall Munroe is famous for his series that explains science using only the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language. So we asked two of our postdoctoral researchers to try a hand at explaining their research the same way.

April 3, 2017
The world is dotted with research reactors that run on highly enriched uranium. For nearly four decades, scientists and engineers at Argonne National Laboratory have been leading the global effort to convert such reactors to run on low-enriched uranium instead.
Into Kazakhstan to Convert a Reactor

The world is dotted with research reactors that run on highly enriched uranium. Argonne engineers are traveling the world to convert them one by one.

April 3, 2017