Feature Stories

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Several Art of Science posters are currently displayed at O’Hare International Airport and will remain up through early 2013. The exhibit is located in the hallways connecting Terminals 2 and 3 adjacent to the Rotunda. (Image courtesy of the City of Chicago Department of Aviation.)
Finding a palate for the science palette

Like art, science expands our notion of the universe.It takes us from microcosms to the cosmos. It lets us envision how our planet was born, and how it might eventually die. No wonder, then, that science can beget compelling art — which is what Argonne National Laboratory’s annual “Art of Science” contest is all about.

September 11, 2012
Argonne researchers Osman Eryilmaz (left) and Gerald Jeka (right) recover industrial parts from the large-scale ultra-fast boriding furnace after a successful boriding treatment. The furnace uses an electrochemical process similar to that of batteries to deposit boron on metal workpieces. (Photo credit: Osman Eryilmaz)
New boriding technique coats metal workpieces in minutes

Growing up in Turkey, Ali Erdemir and Osman Eryilmaz would sometimes play with the borax deposits near the mountains by their homes — but only later would they discover that borax would underlie one of their crowning achievements as scientists.

September 5, 2012
In this split screen image, Argonne engineer Henning Lohse-Busch evaluates an electric vehicle under extreme hot (left) and cold conditions (right). The Advanced Powertrain Research Facility’s Environmental Test Cell is equipped to evaluate vehicles and their components at a temperature range of 20°F to 95°F.
Turning up the heat: Argonne’s thermal cell facility puts vehicles to the test

Argonne’s world-class Advanced Powertrain Research Facility now includes a thermal chamber that can deliver temperatures ranging from frigid cold to sweltering heat.

August 30, 2012
In the Materials Engineering Research Facility’s process research and development lab, Argonne chemist Trevor Dzwiniel sets up a reaction calorimeter, which precisely measures how much heat a chemical reaction generates. This vital information is used to assess the scalability and safety of a reaction or process.
The research bench meets industry: New facility scales up production of battery materials

Argonne’s new Materials Engineering Research Facility allows researchers to safely determine fast and economical ways of producing large quantities of advanced battery materials for commercial testing.

August 21, 2012
Simulated structures showing the starting material of carbon-60 “buckyballs” (magenta) and m-xylene solvent (blue) before being compressed. (Credit: Carnegie Institute of Washington)
Scientists create new diamond-denting carbon

A new super-hard form of carbon has been created by an international team of scientists working with X-rays at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory.

August 20, 2012
Argonne is readying one of the Department of Energy's mobile climate testing facilities for a run aboard the cargo container ship Horizon Spirit as it traverses the Pacific Ocean. During a test run in February 2012, scientists launched a type of sensor called a radiosonde from different locations on the ship to determine the best location to accomplish the launch. Photo courtesy ARM Climate Research Facility.
Mobile climate observatory prepares for campaign aboard ship

Following a six-month land-based campaign in the Maldives to study tropical convective clouds, the Department of Energy’s second Atmospheric Radiation Measurement mobile facility is being readied for a research campaign aboard a cargo container ship in the Pacific Ocean.

August 16, 2012
Argonne scientists analyzed how proposed solar development would affect waterways. This figure, put together by Argonne researchers, shows stream channel sensitivity to surface disturbances near the Brenda Solar Energy Zone in Arizona.
Argonne supports solar energy planning in Southwest

With Argonne's help, the U.S. Departments of the Interior and Energy have reached a milestone in their efforts to accelerate solar energy development on public lands in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico and Utah — a corner of the country where the sun shines strong and hard.

August 14, 2012
On the surface, Fulla Abdul-Jabbar seems like any other young Argonne researcher. She is eager to learn, deftly navigates laboratory spaces and speaks passionately about her work. But one major detail sets her apart from her colleagues — she is 21 years old and has only worked at Argonne for a brief 10 weeks.
U.S. Department of Energy student internships foster scientific and self-discovery

On the surface, Fulla Abdul-Jabbar seems like any other young Argonne researcher. She is eager to learn, deftly navigates laboratory spaces and speaks passionately about her work. But one major detail sets her apart from her colleagues — she is 21 years old and has only worked at Argonne for a brief 10 weeks.

August 9, 2012
Argonne materials scientist Anil Mane examines a microchannel plate.
Award-winning technology provides a breakthrough in particle physics

High-energy physics, it turns out, is a lot like life – it’s all about the timing.

August 3, 2012
Argonne bioscientist Phil Laible displays a sample of a photosynthetic bacterium capable of creating usable biofuels from wastewater streams.
Biofuels: Anywhere, anytime

Five questions about Argonne’s Endurance Bioenergy Reactor.

August 2, 2012