Feature Stories

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In a 3D structure of the protein, the binding site is shown in pink, representing a potential drug target. The green molecule shows binding of an antibiotic to the protein. Click to enlarge. Image courtesy of Wladek Minor.
Newly ID’d protein provides target for antibiotic-resistant hospital bacterium

Researchers have made inroads into tackling a bacterium that plagues hospitals and is highly resistant to most antibiotics. They determined the 3-D structure and likely function of a new protein in this common bacterium that attacks those with compromised immune systems

November 26, 2013
The release of wastes associated with nuclear reprocessing from storage facilities into the underlying sediments and groundwater is an important environmental concern. Scientists working with two national laboratories have found evidence that iron-bearing minerals naturally abundant in some sediments can react with and immobilize contaminants such as technetium. Image courtesy Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. Click to enlarge.
Iron-bearing minerals in sediments naturally reduce contaminant levels

The release of wastes associated with nuclear reprocessing from storage facilities into the underlying sediments and groundwater is an important environmental concern. Scientists working with two national laboratories have found evidence that iron-bearing minerals naturally abundant in some sediments can react with and immobilize contaminants such as technetium.

April 8, 2014
The Argonne Distinguished Fellow title is comparable in stature to an endowed chair at a top-ranked university and recognizes exceptional contributions in a person's field. The rank is given for sustained outstanding scientific and engineering research and can also be associated with outstanding technical leadership of major, complex, high-priority projects. (Click image to enlarge)
Argonne names Distinguished Fellows for 2014

Argonne has named scientists Paul Messina, Michael Borland, U. (Balu) Balachandran, and Yousry Gohar as Distinguished Fellows, the laboratory’s highest scientific and engineering rank.

September 9, 2014
This 3D structural model of the SemiSWEET protein was based on data collected at the NE-CAT beamline at Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source . The two colors (green and purple) represent two copies of the protein molecules that, when joined, function as a single unit to allow sugar molecules across the membrane. Credit: Feng et al. (Click image to enlarge)
X-rays unlock a protein’s SWEET side

Sugar is a vital source of energy for both plants and animals alike. Understanding just how sugar makes its way into the cell could lead to the design of better drugs for diabetes patients and an increase in the amount of fruits and vegetables farmers are able to grow. Stanford University researchers have recently uncovered one of these “pathways” into the cell by piecing together proteins slightly wider than the diameter of a strand of spider silk.

September 12, 2014