Feature Stories

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“There’s a delicate balance you have to strike,” said Argonne physicist Byeongdu Lee, who led the characterization of the supraparticles using high-energy X-rays provided by Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source. “If the attractive Van der Waals force is too strong, all the nanoparticles will smash together at once, and you’ll end up with an ugly, disordered glass. But if the repulsive Coulomb force is too strong, they’ll never come together in the first place.”
A new way to go from nanoparticles to supraparticles

Controlling the behavior of nanoparticles can be just as difficult trying to wrangle a group of teenagers. However, a new study involving Argonne National Laboratory has given scientists insight into how tweaking a nanoparticle’s attractive electronic qualities can lead to the creation of ordered uniform “supraparticles.”

September 19, 2011
A team of researchers at Argonne has developed the new "multilayer Laue lens," that will let scientists study the nanoscale in greater detail than ever before. From left to right: Bing Shi, Lahsen Assoufid, Brian Stephenson, Jörg Maser, Chian Liu, Lisa Gades. Not pictured: Al Macrander.
Argonne-pioneered X-ray lens to aid nanomaterials research

A team of researchers at Argonne National Laboratory has developed the new "multilayer Laue lens". This lens focuses high-energy X-rays so tightly they can detect objects as small as 15 nanometers in size and is in principle capable of focusing to well below 10 nanometers.

August 15, 2011
Argonne researcher Byeongdu Lee has determined that different shapes of gold nanoparticles, above and below, will self-assemble into different configurations when attached to single strands of DNA.
DNA can act like Velcro for nanoparticles

Argonne researcher Byeongdu Lee and his colleagues at Northwestern University discovered that strands of DNA can act as a kind of nanoscopic "Velcro" that binds different nanoparticles together.

November 17, 2010
A SLAC researcher works on the newly-opened Linac Coherent Light Source. Image courtesy of SLAC.
LCLS comes online, with some help from Argonne

The recently opened Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory provides scientists around the world with a brilliant new tool to understand fundamental properties of atoms and materials at previously unreachable dimensions. Its birth, however, could not have occurred without the expertise of Argonne scientists.

September 3, 2010