Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

Date Postedsort ascending
"This new method gives a way of delivering the dose of therapeutic cargo much more directly, which will enable us to have the same overall effect with a lower total dose, reducing the unpleasant and dangerous side effects of chemotherapy," said oncologist Ezra Cohen, an author of the study. Click to enlarge.
New nanotech invention improves effectiveness of the 'penicillin of cancer'

By combining magnetic nanoparticles with one of the most common and effective chemotherapy drugs, Argonne researchers have created a way to deliver anti-cancer drugs directly into the nucleus of cancer cells.

August 13, 2014
A recent Argonne study has called into question the existence of silicene, thought to be one of the world’s newest and hottest two-dimensional nanomaterials. Pictured are researchers (clockwise from bottom left) Nathan Guisinger, Andrew J. Mannix, Brian Kiraly and Brandon L. Fisher. Photo credit: Wes Agresta, Argonne National Laboratory. Click image to enlarge.
Silicene: To be or not to be?

A recent study at Argonne National Laboratory has called into question the existence of silicene, thought to be one of the world’s newest and hottest two-dimensional nanomaterials. The study may have great implications to a multi-billion dollar electronics industry that seeks to revolutionize technology at scales 80,000 times smaller than the human hair.

July 24, 2014
Katie Carrado Gregar is a nanoscientist and the user/outreach programs manager at the Center for Nanoscale Materials.
Ask a scientist: Nanotech in our lives

"Is there nanotechnology already in my consumer products?" Argonne nanoscientist Katie Carrado Gregar answers.

June 1, 2014
Argonne materials scientist Seungbum Hong studies the internal structure of piezoelectric materials. These are certain types of crystals that generate electricity when you squeeze them.
Batteries not needed?

The day is coming when heartbeats power pacemakers, sneakers charge cell phones during a jog, and tires power their own pressure sensors as they rotate.

September 13, 2013
Argonne biologist Rosemarie Wilton works on ways to stabilize antibodies, which tend to degrade over time.
Antibody builders

Because antibodies are naturally so good at recognizing a host of different pathogens, Argonne biologist Rosemarie Wilton has spent much of her career working to better stabilize antibodies and prevent them from degrading over time.

September 13, 2013
How your smartphone got so smart

The breakthroughs that let you fit a computer in your pocket, and where we're going from here.

September 13, 2013
Amanda Petford-Long is Director of Argonne's Nanscience and Technology Division as well as the lab's Center for Nanoscale Materials.
Center for Nanoscale Materials Director Petford-Long chats with 'Science in Parliament'

Amanda Petford-Long, Director of Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials, answers questions for the Summer 2013 issue of Science in Parliament.

July 23, 2013
A high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image of the core of a single silver nanowire. The scale bar represents 5 nm in length.  The image was taken on the Argonne Chromatic Aberration-corrected TEM (ACAT) machine.
Sterling science: Strain in silver nanoparticles creates unusual “twinning”

When twins are forced to share, it can put a significant strain on their relationship. While this observation is perhaps unsurprising in the behavior of children, it is less obvious when it comes to nanoparticles.

August 27, 2012
“The possibilities of science are limitless,” said high school senior Avinash Prakash.  “Science is continually growing.  Through research we are part of a continuing process.”
New program puts high school students in role of scientists

In commencement speeches across the country, graduates have been warned to expect rocky times breaking into the workforce. Unemployment hovers between 8 and 9 percent. Competition is tough.

June 6, 2012
While diamonds may be a girl’s best friend, they’re also well-loved by scientists working to enhance the performance of electronic devices. Two new studies performed at Argonne have revealed a new pathway for materials scientists to use previously unexplored properties of nanocrystalline-diamond thin films.
Diamond brightens the performance of electronic devices

While diamonds may be a girl’s best friend, they’re also well-loved by scientists working to enhance the performance of electronic devices.

March 12, 2012