Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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In these high-speed x-ray images, the 3-D printer is using a laser to melt metal powder, which causes a ‘keyhole’ defect within the cooled material. Researchers at Argonne are studying this process and developing guidelines to avoid such errors. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne efforts accelerate 3-D printing journey

Argonne scientists’ first glimpse inside additive manufacturing process yields important advancements

September 6, 2017
A simulated sky image of galaxies produced by running Argonne-developed high-performance computing codes and then running a galaxy formation model.  Argonne has collaborated with the University of Illinois, teaming up two supercomputers to perform simulation and data analysis of extremely large-scale, computationally intensive models of the universe. (Image by Lindsey Bleem, Nan Li, and the HACC team/Argonne National Laboratory; Mike Gladders/University of Chicago.)
Big Bang – The Movie

In a new approach to enable scientific breakthroughs, researchers linked together supercomputers at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) and at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

August 24, 2017
Students practice new skills taught in the 2017 coding camp. Participants explored how Argonne scientists use computers in diverse disciplines and were introduced to up-to-date programming tools. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Widening horizons for high schoolers with code

In July, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory hosted a five-day Coding Camp for more than two dozen high school juniors and seniors, teaching new programming skills and how computer science is an integral part of an Argonne researcher’s life.

August 23, 2017
Summer intern William Trevillyan explaind his nanoparticle research with fellow intern Savannah Mitchem. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Young minds take the stage at Argonne

Argonne’s Learning on the Lawn celebration capped 10 weeks of intense discoveries and experimentation for 90 students, led by luminaries from across the laboratory – from nuclear engineers to biologists to experts in exascale computing, systems that will be 50+ times quicker than today’s supercomputers.

August 16, 2017
A new material developed at Argonne shows promise for batteries that store electricity for the grid. The material consists of carefully structured molecules designed to be particularly electrochemically stable in order to prevent the battery from losing energy to unwanted reactions. (Image by Robert Horn, Argonne National Laboratory.)
New battery material goes with the flow

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have engineered a new material to be used in redox flow batteries, which are particularly useful for storing electricity for the grid. The material consists of carefully structured molecules designed to be particularly electrochemically stable in order to prevent the battery from losing energy to unwanted reactions.

August 11, 2017
Chain Reaction Innovation entrepreneurs Justin Whiteley and Tyler Huggins work with Argonne scientist Meltem Urgun-Demirtas in an Energy Systems Division laboratory to grow tunable, high-performance porous carbon from fungi. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Growing a startup with a big impact from a tiny fungi

A startup company working with Argonne’s Chain Reaction Innovations is designing a new form of activated carbon for use in filtration, chemical separation and biogas conditioning.

August 9, 2017
(Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Big Data meets big healthcare for veterans

Veterans will be the ultimate winners in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs-Department of Energy (DOE) Big Data Science Initiative, a collaborative research effort that casts Argonne National Laboratory in a prominent role.

August 7, 2017
Image of the protein tryptophan synthase created using diffraction data from Argonne's Advanced Photon Source. The inhibitor binds between the reaction sites in the protein, represented here by the orange and blue pockets. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
"Monkey wrench" molecule jams tuberculosis protein

Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory were part of a recent discovery of a new molecule that attacks tuberculosis-causing bacteria by cutting off its production of a chemical necessary for its survival.

August 4, 2017
In 2016, Argonne conducted a cultural assessment stemming from a Solar Energy Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Solar PEIS) covering six Southwestern states that Argonne’s Environmental Sciences Division. One of the first studies to portray how Spanish and Mexican settlers of the area related to the land before the U.S. government assumed jurisdiction. Argonne’s charge was to determine which public lands within those states would be technically and environmentally suitable for solar energy development. (Image by K. Wescott/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne uses digital tools to preserve Southwestern cultural heritage

Hollywood’s Indiana Jones gained fame for wielding his pistol and bullwhip, but researchers at Argonne National Laboratory prefer to equip themselves with something far more sophisticated: Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis.

August 2, 2017
An image of the <a href="http://www.ne.anl.gov/About/reactors/lwr3.shtml">Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR)</a> in 1956. The EBWR generated plutonium-based electricity for Argonne's physical plant in 1966. When it was decommissioned the following year by Argonne’s D&D Projects Group, EBWR had established a reputation as the forerunner of many commercial nuclear energy plants. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Nuclear energy comes full circle: Argonne takes part in the start-up and shut down of nuclear reactors

Since the world’s first nuclear chain reaction ignited 75 years ago, Argonne has led the way in developing nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. That legacy comes full circle through Argonne’s Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program, which has led the way in decommissioning nuclear facilities at the lab and around the world for over 40 years.

July 31, 2017