Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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Argonne chemist Amanda Youker uses a remote manipulator arm to process and purify radioisotopes in a radiation cell. (Argonne National Laboratory)
Argonne radioisotopes have potential for medical diagnosis and treatment

Using its electron linear accelerator, Argonne enabled two companies to demonstrate new methods for the production of molybdenum-99, the parent isotope of technetium-99m — a medical isotope that could face short supply.

November 14, 2016
Argonne scientists Ivan Sadovskyy (left) and Valerii Vinokur published a paper showing a mathematical construction to a possible local violation of the Second Law of the Thermodynamics. One implication for the research could be a way to one day remotely power a device — that is, the energy expended to light the lamp could take place anywhere. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne researchers posit way to locally circumvent Second Law of Thermodynamics

For more than a century and a half of physics, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, which states that entropy always increases, has been as close to inviolable as any law we know. In this universe, chaos reigns supreme. But Argonne researchers announced recently that they may have discovered a little loophole in this famous maxim.

October 19, 2016
DOE is partnering with the National Cancer Institute in an “all-government” approach to fighting cancer.  Called the Joint Design of Advanced Computing Solutions for Cancer, this initial three-year pilot project makes use of DOE supercomputing resources to build sophisticated computational models that facilitate breakthroughs in the fight against cancer on the molecular, patient and population levels. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory)
Cancer’s big data problem

The U.S. Department of Energy is partnering with the National Cancer Institute in an “all-government” approach to fighting cancer. Part of this partnership is a three-year pilot project called the Joint Design of Advanced Computing Solutions for Cancer, which will use DOE supercomputing to build sophisticated computational models to facilitate breakthroughs in the fight against cancer on the molecular, patient and population levels.

October 19, 2016
Building project managers and scientific leads confer at the site of a new clean room under construction at Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the lab will enable scientists and engineers to build extremely sensitive detectors — such as those capable of detecting light from the early days of the universe. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Building a room clean enough to make sensors to find light from the birth of the universe

Work is underway at Argonne on an expansion of its “clean room.” The new lab will be specially suited for building parts for ultra-sensitive detectors — such as those to carry out improved X-ray research, or for the South Pole Telescope to search for light from the early days of the universe.

October 17, 2016
SUE the Dinosaur’s forearm came to the Advanced Photon Source for its most detailed scan ever, which could shed light on why the large dinosaur had such small arms. (Image courtesy Field Museum)
Why did T. rex have such small arms? SUE arrives at Advanced Photon Source for its most detailed scan ever

SUE the Dinosaur’s forearm came to the Advanced Photon Source for its most detailed scan ever, which could shed light on why the large dinosaur had such small arms.

October 12, 2016
Hydrogen fuel cells, like the one shown above, could provide many advantages and pathways for cleaner energy use. (science photo/Shutterstock)
Six things you might not know about hydrogen

October 8th is National Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Day. To celebrate, here are a few things you might not know about hydrogen and fuel cells.

October 7, 2016
The new Materials Design Laboratory at Argonne will be the final building to complete Argonne’s Energy Quad, a group of four adjoining buildings designed to maximize collaboration between energy and materials scientists at Argonne. A groundbreaking ceremony was held on September 2.
Lab breaks ground on new Materials Design Laboratory to spur transformative technologies

From designing tailored superconductors to transform the nation's energy grid to developing better materials for wind turbines and finding potential replacements for silicon for next-generation computers, the next new building at Argonne will allow scientists to discover new materials, understand how they work and put them to use.

September 26, 2016
Researchers at Argonne modeled the HcaR protein complex, above, a sort of molecular policeman that controls when to activate genes that code for enzymes used by  Acinetobacter bacteria to break down compounds for food. Understanding these processes can help scientists develop ideas for converting more carbon in soil. (Image courtesy Kim et al./Journal of Biological Chemistry.)
Two protein studies discover molecular secrets to recycling carbon and healing cells

Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory have mapped out two very different types of protein. One helps soil bacteria digest carbon compounds; the other protects cells from the effects of harmful molecules.

September 9, 2016
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign graduate student Elena Montoto (right) receives her Hispanic-Latino Club scholarship.
Argonne’s Hispanic-Latino Club gives back

Argonne's Hispanic-Latino Employee Resource Group awarded $5,100 in scholarships to students from junior high to university levels this spring.

June 21, 2016
Neuqua Valley High School  students Anna Thomas, Vanessa Cai, Nadia Young and Natalie Ferguson discuss an experiment at Sector 20 of the Advanced Photon Source, a large synchrotron at Argonne National Laboratory. The students used X-rays to study ancient pottery. (Photo by Mark Lopez, Argonne National Laboratory)
High schoolers study ancient pottery at Advanced Photon Source

The experimental facilities of a typical high school physics classroom don’t usually include a synchrotron. But Natalie Ferguson and more than 60 of her schoolmates not only got to see the Advanced Photon Source: they used it to do research.

June 16, 2016