Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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Students get ready to race the cars they've built at the 2016 Electric Car
Competition.
From the classroom to the real world

Argonne’s educational opportunities help students apply
classroom knowledge to real-world problems.

April 3, 2017
"To take the next step in nanoscience, we need to master reproduction and adaptation. How can we think about making it easier to repair individual units in artificial systems?"
Crowdsource: What will your field of science look like in 50 years?

CROWDSOURCE asks Argonne scientists from different disciplines to each provide a perspective on a complex question. Today we’re asking: What might your field of science look like in 50 years?

April 3, 2017
The random nature of fuel spray leads to significant cycle-to-cycle variations in engines. High-resolution computer simulations conducted on Argonne’s massively powerful supercomputers depict the flow structures that occur during fuel injection. Through its Virtual Engine Research Institute and Fuels Initiative (VERIFI), Argonne has developed engine models and software for large-scale computer simulations that provide—in virtual space, before costly physical production ever begins—a better understanding of how internal combustion engine parameters interact. Image courtesy Sibendu Som; click to view larger.
Four examples of industry gaining an edge by using Argonne facilities

Companies large and small regularly collaborate with Argonne, tapping into the lab’s expertise, facilities, and unique tools.

April 3, 2017
 It created the first human-made controlled nuclear chain reaction exactly 75 years ago. (Click to view infographic larger.)
7 things you might not know about the world's first nuclear reactor

It was built in a squash court under the University of Chicago football stands.

April 3, 2017
The giant synchrotron at Argonne never sleeps, even when the rest of the lab's inhabitants go home at night. Illustration by Rich Lo; click to view larger.
All-nighters for Science

The giant synchrotron at Argonne never sleeps.

April 3, 2017
Scientists have used a new X-ray diffraction technique called Bragg single-angle ptychography to get a clear picture of how planes of atoms shift and squeeze under stress. (Image by Robert Horn/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Single-angle ptychography allows 3D imaging of stressed materials

Scientists have used a new X-ray diffraction technique called Bragg single-angle ptychography to get a clear picture of how planes of atoms shift and squeeze under stress.

March 21, 2017
In 75 steps, Lake Park High School becomes winner of Argonne’s 2017 Rube Goldberg Machine Contest.  The team will participate in the National High School Rube Goldberg Machine Contest Finals held in Columbus, Ohio later this month. (Image by Mark Lopez.)
Lake Park High School wins Argonne’s 2017 Rube Goldberg Machine Challenge

In 75 steps, Lake Park High School won Argonne’s Rube Goldberg Machine Challenge. They now go on to the national competition in Columbus, Ohio.

March 15, 2017
With the theoretical framework developed at Argonne, researchers can more precisely predict particle interactions such as this simulation of a vector boson plus jet event. (Image by Taylor Childers.)
High-precision calculations on supercomputers help reveal the physics of the universe

Argonne researchers have developed a new theoretical approach, ideally suited for high-performance computing systems, capable of making predictive calculations about particle interactions that conform almost exactly to experimental data. This new approach could give scientists a valuable tool for describing new physics and particles beyond those currently identified.

March 9, 2017
Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day (IGED) is a diversity outreach program designed to provide 8th-grade girls an opportunity to learn about science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) careers. Students are assigned to engineer and scientist mentors at Argonne who accompany the girls throughout the day's scheduled activities. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne hosts 15th annual Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day

IGED is a diversity outreach program designed to provide 8th-grade girls an opportunity to learn about science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) careers. Students are assigned to engineer and scientist mentors who accompany the girls throughout the day's scheduled activities.

March 2, 2017
Students from Stony Brook University visited Argonne with research professor Nils Feege to test a prototype of a magnetic cloak — a crucial piece of equipment for a next-generation particle collider — at Argonne’s 4-Tesla Magnet Facility. From left to right: Thomas Krahulik, Nils Feege, Rourke Sekelsky, Joshua LaBounty and Stacy Karthas. (Image by Nils Feege.)
A road trip to test a magnetic cloak at Argonne National Laboratory

In December, five students from Stony Brook University in New York and their research professor loaded a prototype of a magnetic cloak into an SUV and set off for Argonne National Laboratory, nearly 900 miles away.

February 24, 2017