Feature Stories

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“The power of the collaboration comes from uniting different perspectives and expertise around the same problem,” Argonne's Chris Marshall said. “No single investigator or single lab could reasonably expect to complete this kind of work alone.” To view a larger version of the image, click on it.
Researchers hope better catalysts lead to better ways of converting biomass to fuel

Scientists and entrepreneurs of old spent millennia trying to transmute lead into gold. Today, a new and more intellectually rigorous kind of alchemy has begun to produce important benefits for an economy that still relies heavily on fossil fuels.

August 7, 2013
This map catalogues the layers of sediment that make up the Mahomet Aquifer in central Illinois. Researchers at Argonne studied the microbes living deep inside the aquifer. Image courtesy Ted Flynn, Argonne National Laboratory. To view a larger version of the image, click on it.
Methane-eating microbes found in Illinois aquifer

A survey finds unusual methane-eating archaea in an Illinois aquifer.

July 24, 2013
Amanda Petford-Long is Director of Argonne's Nanscience and Technology Division as well as the lab's Center for Nanoscale Materials.
Center for Nanoscale Materials Director Petford-Long chats with 'Science in Parliament'

Amanda Petford-Long, Director of Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials, answers questions for the Summer 2013 issue of Science in Parliament.

July 23, 2013
Q&A: Satellite-based emissions tracking

Argonne-led project examines greenhouse gases from space.

July 22, 2013
Priyanka Ketkar will begin her studies at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities this fall. “I’m impressed by Priyanka’s achievements,” Argonne Chemical Engineer Diane Graziano said. “This is a wonderful scholarship program that Argonne’s involved in, encouraging smart young scholars to pursue careers in engineering.” To view a larger version of the image, click on it.
Argonne sponsors aspiring green energy researcher through Society of Women Engineers program

Argonne sponsored scholarship winner, Priyanka Ketkar, talks about her love of science and engineering and her plans for the future.

July 17, 2013
Illustration of the nano-layer at the liquid interface between the salt solution and mercury. Physicists from Kiel University discovered the formation of an ordered crystal of exactly five atomic layers between the two liquids with brilliant X-rays. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Image courtesy Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel.
Nanocrystals grow from liquid interface

An international collaboration of scientists has discovered a unique crystalizing behavior at the interface between two immiscible liquids that could aid in sustainable energy development.

May 16, 2013
Gordon Electric Supply, Inc. is the only woman-owned, small business distributor of Square D products in the Chicago area.
Small business success story: Gordon Electric Supply, Inc.

Gordon Electric Supply has provided electrical and lighting products and services in the Chicago market for more than 60 years. It is the only woman-owned, small business distributor of Square D products in the Chicago area.

May 14, 2013
David P. Weber, Director of Argonne's Computing and Telecommunications Division from 1986-1994, with Argonne's Cray X-MP computer, a shared-memory parallel vector processor, in 1982. The Cray X-MP was the world's fastest computer between 1983-1985. To view a larger version of the image, click on it.
Adventures in parallelism: Celebrating 30 years of parallel computing at Argonne

Were they visionaries or lucky gamblers? Thirty years ago, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory established the lab’s first experimental parallel computing facility. Today, high-performance computing has become essential to virtually all science and engineering, and Argonne houses one of the fastest parallel machines in the world in support of scientific discovery.

May 13, 2013
“Conventional theory said that these bacteria have to migrate to where their favorite resources are,” Argonne's Jack Gilbert said. “But what this paper suggests is that the old theory of bacteria moving into an environment is wrong. All of the species are always there, just in very small amounts.” To view a larger version of the image, click on it.
Study suggests same microbes may be present in oceans worldwide

A new study from researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory could herald a sea change in how we think about microbes in the ocean.

April 11, 2013
An international team of scientists using Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (above) has devised a way to overcome the distortion caused by sample environments used with the X-rays to improve spatial resolution imaging by two orders of magnitude. To view a larger version of the image, click on it.
High-pressure imaging breakthrough a boon for nanotechnology

The study of nanoscale material just got much easier, and the design of nanoscale technology could get much more efficient, thanks to an advance in X-ray analysis.

April 9, 2013