Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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In September, Argonne hosted over 130 IXPUG participants from around the world for four days of tutorials, workshops and talks aimed at illuminating the still relatively unplumbed world of the Xeon Phi processor. Pictured: Aaron Knoll’s presentation on “Visualization with OSPRay: Research and Production.” (Photo by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory; click to view larger.)
Programmers trade knowledge on Xeon Phi processor at IXPUG conference

In September, Argonne hosted over 130 IXPUG participants from around the world for four days of tutorials, workshops and talks aimed at illuminating the still relatively unplumbed world of the Xeon Phi processor. Users, programmers and systems administrators collaborated to share experiences, trade tips and help one another optimize code for applications ranging from simulating brain tissue to modeling the evolution of the cosmos.

December 21, 2016
This image of a quasicrystal lattice shows the unique symmetric but never repeating pattern of its components.  The colors correspond to the orientation of the magnetic polarization of each edge. (Image by Amanda Petford-Long, Argonne National Laboratory.)
Energy cascades in quasicrystals trigger an avalanche of discovery

In a new study from Argonne National Laboratory, scientists looked at networks of magnetic material patterned into the unique and quite beautiful geometries of quasi-crystals to see how the nature of the non-repeating patterns lead to the emergence of unusual energetic effects.

December 12, 2016
The Argonne research team that has pioneered the use of machine learning tools in 2-D material modeling. (Image by Wes Agresta/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Machine learning enables predictive modeling of 2-D materials

In a study published in The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, a team of researchers led by Argonne computational scientist Subramanian Sankaranarayanan described their use of machine learning tools to create the first atomic-level model that accurately predicts the thermal properties of stanene, a 2-D material made up of a one-atom-thick sheet of tin.

December 7, 2016
Cooling technique helps researchers “target” a major component for a new collider

Researchers at Argonne have recently developed a new ultra-low-friction sliding contact mechanism that uses chilled water to remove heat from a key component of a next-generation collider.

December 2, 2016
Jack Gilbert is the director of the Microbiome Center, an interdisciplinary institution led by Argonne National Laboratory, the University of Chicago and the Marine Biology Laboratory. The center seeks to build our understanding of the microbes found in our surroundings and inside our bodies in order to improve human and environmental health. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Komodo dragons help researchers understand microbial health in captive animals

Researchers at the University of California San Diego, the University of Colorado-Boulder, the University of Chicago and Argonne are the first to identify similarities in the way in which Komodo dragons and humans and their pets share microbes within closed environments.

November 28, 2016
Located fifteen miles north of the Grand Canyon, the Glen Canyon Dam delivers water from the Upper to the Lower Colorado River Basin. Argonne experts helped recommend a long-term strategy for the dam’s operation that would balance hydropower with the protection of environmental, cultural and recreational resources in the area. (Image by John Hayse/Argonne National Laboratory.)
New report balances environmental interests and power needs for Glen Canyon Dam

Researchers at Argonne have helped develop a plan for the operation of Glen Canyon Dam in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, upstream of Grand Canyon National Park. The plan, known as the Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan, and documented in a final environmental impact statement, recommends a strategy that would balance hydropower with the protection of environmental, cultural and recreational resources in the area.

November 17, 2016
Argonne chemist Amanda Youker uses a remote manipulator arm to process and purify radioisotopes in a radiation cell. (Argonne National Laboratory)
Argonne radioisotopes have potential for medical diagnosis and treatment

Using its electron linear accelerator, Argonne enabled two companies to demonstrate new methods for the production of molybdenum-99, the parent isotope of technetium-99m — a medical isotope that could face short supply.

November 14, 2016
Argonne scientists Ivan Sadovskyy (left) and Valerii Vinokur published a paper showing a mathematical construction to a possible local violation of the Second Law of the Thermodynamics. One implication for the research could be a way to one day remotely power a device — that is, the energy expended to light the lamp could take place anywhere. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne researchers posit way to locally circumvent Second Law of Thermodynamics

For more than a century and a half of physics, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, which states that entropy always increases, has been as close to inviolable as any law we know. In this universe, chaos reigns supreme. But Argonne researchers announced recently that they may have discovered a little loophole in this famous maxim.

October 19, 2016
DOE is partnering with the National Cancer Institute in an “all-government” approach to fighting cancer.  Called the Joint Design of Advanced Computing Solutions for Cancer, this initial three-year pilot project makes use of DOE supercomputing resources to build sophisticated computational models that facilitate breakthroughs in the fight against cancer on the molecular, patient and population levels. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory)
Cancer’s big data problem

The U.S. Department of Energy is partnering with the National Cancer Institute in an “all-government” approach to fighting cancer. Part of this partnership is a three-year pilot project called the Joint Design of Advanced Computing Solutions for Cancer, which will use DOE supercomputing to build sophisticated computational models to facilitate breakthroughs in the fight against cancer on the molecular, patient and population levels.

October 19, 2016
Building project managers and scientific leads confer at the site of a new clean room under construction at Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the lab will enable scientists and engineers to build extremely sensitive detectors — such as those capable of detecting light from the early days of the universe. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Building a room clean enough to make sensors to find light from the birth of the universe

Work is underway at Argonne on an expansion of its “clean room.” The new lab will be specially suited for building parts for ultra-sensitive detectors — such as those to carry out improved X-ray research, or for the South Pole Telescope to search for light from the early days of the universe.

October 17, 2016