Feature Stories

Date Postedsort ascending
While diamonds may be a girl’s best friend, they’re also well-loved by scientists working to enhance the performance of electronic devices. Two new studies performed at Argonne have revealed a new pathway for materials scientists to use previously unexplored properties of nanocrystalline-diamond thin films.
Diamond brightens the performance of electronic devices

While diamonds may be a girl’s best friend, they’re also well-loved by scientists working to enhance the performance of electronic devices.

March 12, 2012
Yugang Sun
Argonne Researcher named top five materials scientist of 2000s

Argonne scientist Yugang Sun has been recognized as the one of the five top materials scientists in the world over the past decade, according to a new ranking recently released by Thomson Reuters.

April 1, 2011
This film of block copolymers shows the material's characteristic tendency to separate into distinct regions.
Molecular "stencils" open up new possibilities for solar energy

Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have begun to use molecular “stencils” to pave the way to new materials that could potentially find their way into future generations of solar cells, catalysts and photonic crystals.

November 15, 2010
This computer-generated image shows nanotubes, 10,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair, which comprise a new technique developed at Argonne for "growing" solar cells.
Argonne "homegrown" hybrid solar cell aims for low-cost power

Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have refined a technique to manufacture solar cells by creating tubes of semiconducting material and then "growing" polymers directly inside them.

November 10, 2009
Argonne chemist Jeff Elam examines solar cell materials prepared using atomic layer deposition at various stages of fabrication.
Everything under the sun: Refining solar cell technology at Argonne

"If you thought of powering America as trying to fill a swimming pool," said Argonne materials scientist George Crabtree, "then the energy from the sun's rays would give you enough to fill Lake Michigan."

October 1, 2009