Feature Stories

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Anirudha Sumant is the first Argonne scientist to win two R&D 100 awards in the same year.  In all, he has now won three R&D 100 awards, all related to his work on nanocrystalline diamond. To view a larger version of the image, click on it.
The brilliance of diamonds

Nanocrystalline diamond-related devices developed by Argonne nanoscientist Anirudha Sumant garnered Argonne two of the 2013 R&D 100 awards.

August 20, 2013
How your smartphone got so smart

The breakthroughs that let you fit a computer in your pocket, and where we're going from here.

September 13, 2013
Argonne nanoscientist Seth Darling is using a new 95-kilowatt array at Argonne to study how various types of solar panels perform in the Midwest region.
Something new under the sun: Argonne makes sustainability strides

Argonne grew a fine crop of solar panels last summer.

September 13, 2013
Argonne biologist Rosemarie Wilton works on ways to stabilize antibodies, which tend to degrade over time.
Antibody builders

Because antibodies are naturally so good at recognizing a host of different pathogens, Argonne biologist Rosemarie Wilton has spent much of her career working to better stabilize antibodies and prevent them from degrading over time.

September 13, 2013
Argonne materials scientist Seungbum Hong studies the internal structure of piezoelectric materials. These are certain types of crystals that generate electricity when you squeeze them.
Batteries not needed?

The day is coming when heartbeats power pacemakers, sneakers charge cell phones during a jog, and tires power their own pressure sensors as they rotate.

September 13, 2013
George Crabtree, director of the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research
The future of batteries: Q&A with the director of the national laboratory battery hub

George Crabtree, director of JCESR, talks about the vision, goals, and challenges on the leading edge of battery research.

June 1, 2014
Katie Carrado Gregar is a nanoscientist and the user/outreach programs manager at the Center for Nanoscale Materials.
Ask a scientist: Nanotech in our lives

"Is there nanotechnology already in my consumer products?" Argonne nanoscientist Katie Carrado Gregar answers.

June 1, 2014
"I’m a climate modeler, so we’re trying to pin down what’s happening and what might happen, and for that we take the math approach." -Rao Kotamarthi, Argonne atmospheric scientist
Crowdsource: How do we tackle climate change?

"Crowdsource" asks scientists from varying fields to offer their unique perspectives on a universal problem. Today's question: How do we start tackling climate change?

June 1, 2014
A recent Argonne study has called into question the existence of silicene, thought to be one of the world’s newest and hottest two-dimensional nanomaterials. Pictured are researchers (clockwise from bottom left) Nathan Guisinger, Andrew J. Mannix, Brian Kiraly and Brandon L. Fisher. Photo credit: Wes Agresta, Argonne National Laboratory. Click image to enlarge.
Silicene: To be or not to be?

A recent study at Argonne National Laboratory has called into question the existence of silicene, thought to be one of the world’s newest and hottest two-dimensional nanomaterials. The study may have great implications to a multi-billion dollar electronics industry that seeks to revolutionize technology at scales 80,000 times smaller than the human hair.

July 24, 2014
"This new method gives a way of delivering the dose of therapeutic cargo much more directly, which will enable us to have the same overall effect with a lower total dose, reducing the unpleasant and dangerous side effects of chemotherapy," said oncologist Ezra Cohen, an author of the study. Click to enlarge.
New nanotech invention improves effectiveness of the 'penicillin of cancer'

By combining magnetic nanoparticles with one of the most common and effective chemotherapy drugs, Argonne researchers have created a way to deliver anti-cancer drugs directly into the nucleus of cancer cells.

August 13, 2014