Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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A $16 million U.S. Department of Energy project to accelerate the design of new materials will make use of several national laboratory supercomputers, including the 10-petaflop Mira computer at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility.
Energy Department to invest $16 million in computer design of materials

The U.S. Department of Energy will invest $16 million over the next four years to accelerate the design of new materials through use of supercomputers. Resources at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Advanced Photon Source and Center for Nanoscale Materials will be leveraged for projects.

August 16, 2016
Argonne researchers, from left, Subramanian Sankaranarayanan, Badri Narayanan, Ali Erdemir, Giovanni Ramirez and  Osman Levent Eryilmaz show off metal engine parts that have been treated with a diamond-like carbon coating similar to one developed and explored by the team. The catalytic coating interacts with engine oil to create a self-healing diamond-like film that could have profound implications for the efficiency and durability of future engines. (photo by Wes Agresta)
Argonne discovery yields self-healing diamond-like carbon

A group of researchers at Argonne discovered a revolutionary diamond-like film that is generated by the heat and pressure of an automotive engine. The discovery of this ultra-durable, self-lubricating tribofilm could have profound implications for the efficiency and durability of future engines and other moving metal parts.

August 5, 2016
A transmission electron microscope image taken at Argonne shows the honeycomb structure of the silicon nanowires.  (image by Jiang et al.)
New silicon structures could make better biointerfaces

A team of researchers have engineered silicon particles one-fiftieth the width of a human hair, which could lead to “biointerface” systems designed to make nerve cells fire and heart cells beat.

August 1, 2016
Among the projects that are being supported as part of the first round of funding from DOE's Technology Commercialization Fund is a collaboration between Argonne and ZeaChem, Inc., aimed at improving the processing of biomass-based feedstocks into biofuels and chemicals. (Scanrail1/Shutterstock)
DOE commits more than $1.7 million to help commercialize promising Argonne-associated energy technologies

The U.S. Department of Energy announced that it is committing more than $1.7 million in funding to help Argonne and research partners move multiple promising energy technologies to the marketplace. News of the Argonne awards was part of a larger announcement by DOE that, through the first round of funding from its Technology Commercialization Fund, it will award nearly $16 million to support 54 projects at 12 national labs involving dozens of research partners.

June 27, 2016
Researchers used powerful X-rays to take a molecular look at how the Kaiser-i-Hind butterfly’s wings reflect in brilliant iridescent green. Image: Shutterstock/Butterfly Hunter.
X-rays reveal the photonic crystals in butterfly wings that create color

Scientists used X-rays to discover what creates one butterfly effect: how the microscopic structures on the insect’s wings reflect light to appear as brilliant colors to the eye.

June 10, 2016
Principal chemical engineer Jie Li, left, and postdoctoral researcher Alina Yan create coated nanoparticles in a continuous flow reactor. Nanoparticles are key to an ongoing effort at Argonne to create more efficient window films.
Through a glass, warmly: Argonne nanomaterials can help make windows more efficient

A team of Argonne researchers is using nanomaterials to get closer to one of the holy grails of building efficiency technologies: single-pane windows with efficiency as good or better than multipane low-emission windows. The team recently received a $3.1 million award from DOE’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy to develop a technology that could help achieve that goal.

May 31, 2016
A depiction of magnetic charge ice. Nanoscale magnets are arranged in a two-dimensional lattice. Each nanomagnet produces a pair of magnetic charges, one positive (the red ball on the north pole) and one negative (the blue ball on the south pole). The magnetic flux lines (white) point from positive charges to negative charges. (Image credit: Yong-Lei Wang/Zhili Xiao)
Scientists create 'magnetic charge ice'

A team of scientists working at Argonne National Laboratory, led by Northern Illinois University physicist and Argonne materials scientist Zhili Xiao, has created a new material called “rewritable magnetic charge ice” that permits an unprecedented degree of control over local magnetic fields and could pave the way for new computing technologies.

May 25, 2016
Graduate students Gerwin Koolstra and Ge Yang (left and right), Asst. Prof. David Schuster (center), and collaborators have integrated trapped electrons with superconducting quantum circuits, an advance in the effort to develop quantum computers. (Photo by Rob Hart)
New device steps toward isolating single electrons for quantum computing

If biochemists had access to a quantum computer, they could perfectly simulate the properties of new molecules to develop novel drugs in ways that would take the fastest existing computers decades.

May 20, 2016
Researchers from Argonne’s Surface and Lubrication Interaction, Discovery and Engineering initiative developed a novel “diamond-like” coating that could prove of great benefit when used to coat equipment for wind turbines, like the bearing in this photo. Pictured from left, Levent Eryilmaz, Giovanni Ramirez, Ali Erdemir and Aaron Greco.
Gone with the wind: Argonne coating shows surprising potential to improve reliability in wind power

A group of researchers from Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Akron discovered that a particular form of carbon coating not necessarily designed for wind turbines may indeed prove a boon to the wind industry.

May 17, 2016
A team of Argonne researchers (from left, Khalil Amine, Jun Lu, Larry Curtiss, Zonghai Chen, Kah Chun Lau, and Hsien-Hau Wang) have developed a way to create stable lithium superoxide in a lithium-air battery system.
Stable "superoxide" opens the door to a new class of batteries

Argonne scientists, working with American and Korean collaborators, produced stable crystallized lithium superoxide during battery discharging. Unlike lithium peroxide, this superoxide can easily dissociate into lithium and oxygen, leading to high efficiency and good cycle life in lithium-air batteries.

January 12, 2016