Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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Trying to understand a system of atoms is like herding gnats – the individual atoms are never at rest and are constantly moving and interacting. When it comes to trying to model the properties and behavior of these kinds of systems, scientists use two fundamentally different pictures of reality, one of which is called “statistical” and the other “dynamical.” The two approaches have at times been at odds, but scientists from Argonne recently announced a way to reconcile the two pictures.
Argonne theorists solve a long-standing fundamental problem

Trying to understand a system of atoms is like herding gnats – the individual atoms are never at rest and are constantly moving and interacting. When it comes to trying to model the properties and behavior of these kinds of systems, scientists use two fundamentally different pictures of reality, one of which is called “statistical” and the other “dynamical.” The two approaches have at times been at odds, but Argonne scientists have announced a way to reconcile the two pictures.

August 30, 2016
Chicago Department of Transportation workers install the first public Array of Things node at the intersection of Damen and Archer Avenues in Chicago. (image credit: Urban Center for Computation and Data)
Chicago becomes first city to launch Array of Things, an unprecedented urban sensing project

The Array of Things team begins the first phase of the groundbreaking urban sensing project, installing the first of an eventual 500 nodes on city streets. By measuring data on air quality, climate, traffic and other urban features, these pilot nodes kick off an innovative partnership between the University of Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory, and the City of Chicago to better understand, serve, and improve cities.

August 29, 2016
In one of the collaborations, XL Hybrids Inc. of Boston intends to perform chassis dyno testing, validation and improvement of its XL3 hybrid electric upfit for the diesel Isuzu Reach Class 3 truck in Argonne's high-fidelity testing environment.
Energy Department awards five new Argonne-business collaborations under Small Business Vouchers pilot

The U.S. Department of Energy announced that 43 small businesses will participate in the second round of the Small Business Vouchers pilot. With vouchers in hand, these businesses can better leverage the world-class capabilities of the DOE national laboratories.

August 23, 2016
A $16 million U.S. Department of Energy project to accelerate the design of new materials will make use of several national laboratory supercomputers, including the 10-petaflop Mira computer at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility.
Energy Department to invest $16 million in computer design of materials

The U.S. Department of Energy will invest $16 million over the next four years to accelerate the design of new materials through use of supercomputers. Resources at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Advanced Photon Source and Center for Nanoscale Materials will be leveraged for projects.

August 16, 2016
Yan (Joann) Zhou, principal transportation systems analyst, talks to members of the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC) Clean Vehicles Consortium (CVC), which had its annual meeting at Argonne this month. Zhou is the operations manager of the U.S. CERC-CVC. (photo by Wes Agresta)
Chinese delegation visits Argonne for vehicle research project meeting

More than 100 researchers from the United States and China met at Argonne National Laboratory to begin a new phase of collaboration on development of technologies to enhance vehicle efficiency in the two countries. Argonne is leading the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center Clean Vehicles Consortium.

August 16, 2016
Argonne researchers, from left, Subramanian Sankaranarayanan, Badri Narayanan, Ali Erdemir, Giovanni Ramirez and  Osman Levent Eryilmaz show off metal engine parts that have been treated with a diamond-like carbon coating similar to one developed and explored by the team. The catalytic coating interacts with engine oil to create a self-healing diamond-like film that could have profound implications for the efficiency and durability of future engines. (photo by Wes Agresta)
Argonne discovery yields self-healing diamond-like carbon

A group of researchers at Argonne discovered a revolutionary diamond-like film that is generated by the heat and pressure of an automotive engine. The discovery of this ultra-durable, self-lubricating tribofilm could have profound implications for the efficiency and durability of future engines and other moving metal parts.

August 5, 2016
A transmission electron microscope image taken at Argonne shows the honeycomb structure of the silicon nanowires.  (image by Jiang et al.)
New silicon structures could make better biointerfaces

A team of researchers have engineered silicon particles one-fiftieth the width of a human hair, which could lead to “biointerface” systems designed to make nerve cells fire and heart cells beat.

August 1, 2016
In a new study from the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Illinois at Chicago, researchers have found a way to convert carbon dioxide into a usable energy source by using sunlight. (Image: Shutterstock)
A new leaf: Scientists turn carbon dioxide back into fuel

In a new study from Argonne and the University of Illinois at Chicago, researchers have found a way to convert carbon dioxide into a usable energy source.

July 29, 2016
An international team working at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory has devised a method for achieving static pressures vastly higher than any previously reached. Above: an image of a diamond anvil cell inside the pressure chamber.  (Image via Dubrovinskaia et al./Science)
Diamonds help generate new record for static pressures for study

An international team working at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne has devised a method for achieving 1 terapascal of static pressure, vastly higher than any previously reached.

July 28, 2016
Argonne scientists created a triple-layer metal oxide in a never-before-made single-crystal form. Using powerful X-rays at the Advanced Photon Source, they saw a unique spacing signature (orange spots, above) that signaled the presence of charge striping, a phenomenon previously only observed in single-layer oxides. (Image by Mitchell et al.)
Physicists show trilayer metal oxide’s true stripes

A team of Argonne researchers created a triple-layer metal oxide in a never-before-made single-crystal form and observed in it an interesting phenomenon called "charge striping," which may shed light on the physics behind similar useful electronic properties of metal oxides, such as superconductivity.

July 26, 2016