Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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A new study by Argonne researchers determined that magnetic skyrmions – small electrically uncharged circular structures with a spiraling magnetic pattern – do get deflected by an applied current, much like a curveball getting deflected by air. (Photo by Mark Lopez, Argonne National Laboratory)
Argonne ahead of the “curve” in magnetic study

In a new study by Argonne researchers, scientists noticed that magnetic skyrmions – small electrically uncharged circular structures with a spiraling magnetic pattern – do get deflected by an applied current, much like a curveball gets deflected by airflow.

September 21, 2016
Former Argonne postdoctoral researcher Diana Berman and Argonne nanoscientist Anirudha Sumant, along with several collaborators, developed a new and inexpensive way to grow pure graphene using a diamond substrate. (Wes Agresta/Argonne National Laboratory)
Diamond proves useful material for growing graphene

A team has developed a method to grow graphene that contains relatively few impurities, and costs less to make, in a shorter time and at lower temperatures compared to the processes widely used to make graphene today.

September 16, 2016
A new study from Argonne National Laboratory has shown water can serve a previously undiscovered role to help micelles coalesce to spontaneously form long fibers. The study could help scientists to understand how light-harvesting molecules are incorporated into the micelle fiber as it assembles, which would be a key step to understanding some forms of artificial photosynthesis. (Image courtesy of Robert Horn/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Water helps assembly of biofibers that could capture sunlight

A new study from Argonne National Laboratory has shown water can serve a previously undiscovered role to help micelles coalesce to spontaneously form long fibers. The study could help scientists to understand how light-harvesting molecules are incorporated into the micelle fiber as it assembles, which would be a key step to understanding some forms of artificial photosynthesis.

September 12, 2016
A $16 million U.S. Department of Energy project to accelerate the design of new materials will make use of several national laboratory supercomputers, including the 10-petaflop Mira computer at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility.
Energy Department to invest $16 million in computer design of materials

The U.S. Department of Energy will invest $16 million over the next four years to accelerate the design of new materials through use of supercomputers. Resources at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Advanced Photon Source and Center for Nanoscale Materials will be leveraged for projects.

August 16, 2016
Argonne researchers, from left, Subramanian Sankaranarayanan, Badri Narayanan, Ali Erdemir, Giovanni Ramirez and  Osman Levent Eryilmaz show off metal engine parts that have been treated with a diamond-like carbon coating similar to one developed and explored by the team. The catalytic coating interacts with engine oil to create a self-healing diamond-like film that could have profound implications for the efficiency and durability of future engines. (photo by Wes Agresta)
Argonne discovery yields self-healing diamond-like carbon

A group of researchers at Argonne discovered a revolutionary diamond-like film that is generated by the heat and pressure of an automotive engine. The discovery of this ultra-durable, self-lubricating tribofilm could have profound implications for the efficiency and durability of future engines and other moving metal parts.

August 5, 2016
A transmission electron microscope image taken at Argonne shows the honeycomb structure of the silicon nanowires.  (image by Jiang et al.)
New silicon structures could make better biointerfaces

A team of researchers have engineered silicon particles one-fiftieth the width of a human hair, which could lead to “biointerface” systems designed to make nerve cells fire and heart cells beat.

August 1, 2016
Among the projects that are being supported as part of the first round of funding from DOE's Technology Commercialization Fund is a collaboration between Argonne and ZeaChem, Inc., aimed at improving the processing of biomass-based feedstocks into biofuels and chemicals. (Scanrail1/Shutterstock)
DOE commits more than $1.7 million to help commercialize promising Argonne-associated energy technologies

The U.S. Department of Energy announced that it is committing more than $1.7 million in funding to help Argonne and research partners move multiple promising energy technologies to the marketplace. News of the Argonne awards was part of a larger announcement by DOE that, through the first round of funding from its Technology Commercialization Fund, it will award nearly $16 million to support 54 projects at 12 national labs involving dozens of research partners.

June 27, 2016
Researchers used powerful X-rays to take a molecular look at how the Kaiser-i-Hind butterfly’s wings reflect in brilliant iridescent green. Image: Shutterstock/Butterfly Hunter.
X-rays reveal the photonic crystals in butterfly wings that create color

Scientists used X-rays to discover what creates one butterfly effect: how the microscopic structures on the insect’s wings reflect light to appear as brilliant colors to the eye.

June 10, 2016
Principal chemical engineer Jie Li, left, and postdoctoral researcher Alina Yan create coated nanoparticles in a continuous flow reactor. Nanoparticles are key to an ongoing effort at Argonne to create more efficient window films.
Through a glass, warmly: Argonne nanomaterials can help make windows more efficient

A team of Argonne researchers is using nanomaterials to get closer to one of the holy grails of building efficiency technologies: single-pane windows with efficiency as good or better than multipane low-emission windows. The team recently received a $3.1 million award from DOE’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy to develop a technology that could help achieve that goal.

May 31, 2016
From left, researchers Ani Sumant, Ali Erdemir, Subramanian Sankaranarayanan, Sanket Deshmukh, and Diana Berman combined diamond, graphene, and carbon to achieve superlubricity.
Argonne-developed technology for achieving superlubricity wins 2016 TechConnect National Innovation Award

A graphene-nanodiamond solution for achieving superlubricity developed at Argonne National Laboratory has won a 2016 TechConnect National Innovation Award. Using miniscule diamonds wrapped in graphene, friction can be reduced to almost zero value. This superlubricity effect is a very enticing prospect for industries making everything from computer hard drives to wind turbines.

May 26, 2016