Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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Argonne team members (from left to right): Rajeev Assary, Cong Liu, Badri Narayanan, Anh Ngo and Larry Curtiss. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Out of thin air

Argonne researchers conducted basic science computational studies as part of a collaboration with researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago to design a “beyond-lithium-ion” battery cell that operates by running on air over many charge and discharge cycles. The design offers energy storage capacity about three times that of a lithium-ion battery, with significant potential for further improvements.

March 21, 2018
Argonne and Brookhaven researchers observed two kinds of defects forming in individual nanowires, depicted here. These nanowires are smaller in diameter than a human hair. (Image by Megan Hill/Northwestern University.)
Scientists have a new way to gauge the growth of nanowires

In a new study, researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne and Brookhaven National Laboratories observed the formation of two kinds of defects in individual nanowires, which are smaller in diameter than a human hair.

March 19, 2018
Daniel Lopez, Nanofabrication and Devices Group Leader at Argonne’s Center for Nanoscale Materials (right), Federico Capasso, Harvard’s Robert L. Wallace Professor of Applied Physics (left), and four other collaborators have created a smaller, more advanced sensing technology that can be used in a variety of applications including systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks. (Image courtesy of Harvard University.)
A marriage of light-manipulation technologies

Researchers from Argonne and Harvard University built a metasurface-based lens atop a Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) platform. The result is a new, infrared light-focusing system that combines the best features of both technologies while reducing the size of the optical system.

February 27, 2018
Argonne won several R&D 100 Awards for its reusable Oleo Sponge, which can clean up oil spills from water and absorb up to 90 times its own weight in oil. Argonne researchers who helped develop the Oleo Sponge include Jeff Elam, Ed Barry, Seth Darling, Jason Avila, Anil Mane and Joe Libera (from left to right). (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne scientists capture several R&D 100 Awards

Innovative technologies developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory recently earned several R&D 100 Awards.

November 21, 2017
DOE Secretary Rick Perry awarded Argonne with nearly $4.7 million for nine projects in three divisions. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Department of Energy awards flow into Argonne

DOE Secretary Rick Perry awarded Argonne with nearly $4.7 million in projects as part of the DOE’s Office of Technology Transition’s Technology Commercialization Fund (TCF) in September.

October 18, 2017
This shows the synthetic purple membrane assembly developed by Elena Rozhkova and fellow Argonne researchers. The assembly, which includes nanodiscs, titanium dioxide and platinum nanoparticles, can transform sunlight into hydrogen fuel. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Purple power: Synthetic ‘purple membranes’ transform sunlight to hydrogen fuel

Argonne researchers have found a new way to produce solar fuels by developing “synthetic purple membranes.” These membranes involve an assembly of lipid nanodiscs, man-made proteins, and semiconducting nanoparticles that, when taken together, can transform sunlight into hydrogen fuel.

October 12, 2017
“When scientists add or remove a proton (H+) from the perovskite (SmNiO3 (SNO)) lattice, the material’s atomic structure expands or contracts dramatically to accommodate it in a process called ‘lattice breathing,’” said Badri Narayanan, an Argonne assistant material scientist and co-author of the study. But when it happens repeatedly, this activity wanes, resembling human forgetfulness. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Forget about it

Inspired by human forgetfulness — how our brains discard unnecessary data to make room for new information — scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory and three universities, conducted a recent study that combined supercomputer simulation and X-ray characterization of a material that gradually “forgets.” This could one day be used for advanced bio-inspired computing.

October 10, 2017
An electron microscope captured this image of a freshly grown batch of nanowires using the NextGen STEM Kit’s star-shaped mold. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Nanotechnology moves from the clean room to the classroom

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory and United Scientific Supplies, Inc. are introducing high school students to nanoscience with a new hands-on product.

August 18, 2017
During his 15-year career at Argonne, Seth Darling has made a notable impact as a scientist within the Nanoscience and Technology Division and at the Center for Nanoscale Materials. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Seth Darling named Director of the Institute for Molecular Engineering at Argonne

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory has named Seth Darling as Director of the Institute for Molecular Engineering at Argonne (IME at Argonne), effective immediately. IME at Argonne is the Argonne-based partner to the Institute for Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago.

August 15, 2017
Nanoscientist Anirudha Sumant received a 2017 TechConnect National Innovation Award for a method that significantly cuts the time and cost needed to grow graphene. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne-developed technology for producing graphene wins TechConnect National Innovation Award

A method that significantly cuts the time and cost needed to grow graphene has won a 2017 TechConnect National Innovation Award. This is the second year in a row that a team at Argonne’s Center for Nanoscale Materials has received this award.

June 8, 2017