Press Releases

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Because of their potential to reduce costs for both fabrication and materials, organic photovoltaics could be much cheaper to manufacture than conventional solar cells and have a smaller environmental impact as well. To view a larger version of the image, click on it.
Scientists detect residue that has hindered efficiency of promising type of solar cell

Argonne researchers have for the first time been able to detect trace residues of catalyst material on organic photovoltaics.

May 3, 2013
Gold nanoparticles self-assemble into long chains when bombarded with electrons. To view a larger version of the image, click on it.
Scientists see nanoparticles form larger structures in real time

In a new study performed at the Center for Nanoscale Materials at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, researchers have for the first time seen the self-assembly of nanoparticle chains in situ, that is, in place as it occurs in real-time.

April 19, 2013
This wafer of nanocrystalline diamond provides one example of the technology that AKHAN Technologies has licensed from Argonne. To view a larger version of the image, click on it.

Photo courtesy Ani Sumant.
Argonne licenses diamond semiconductor discoveries to AKHAN Technologies

Argonne announced today that the laboratory has granted AKHAN Technologies exclusive diamond semiconductor application licensing rights to breakthrough low-temperature diamond deposition technology developed by the lab's Center for Nanoscale Materials.

March 4, 2013
Among the Picasso paintings in the Art Institute of Chicago collection, The Red Armchair is the most emblematic of his Ripolin usage and is the painting that was examined with APS X-rays at Argonne National Laboratory. To view a larger version of the image, click on it.

Courtesy Art Institute of Chicago, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Saidenberg (AIC 1957.72) © Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
High-energy X-rays shine light on mystery of Picasso’s paints

The Art Institute of Chicago teamed up with Argonne National Laboratory to unravel a decades-long debate among art scholars about what kind of paint Picasso used to create his masterpieces.

February 6, 2013
The reduction of iron(III) oxide minerals is an important component of iron cycling in the subsurface. For example, certain bacteria couple carbon oxidation and iron reduction to obtain energy from growth. Although iron oxides are poor conductors of electricity, electrons that are transfered to an iron oxide mineral are quite mobile, using thermal energy to hop from one iron atom to another. New research used time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy to quantify the hopping rates for different iron(III) mineral phases and to confirm a theoretical picture of how the electron at one site alters the positions of the atoms around it.  This work contributes to our understanding of how soil mineralogy evolves when geochemical or biochemical processes create reducing conditions. (Image courtesy Benjamin Gilbert, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory).
A clearer look at how iron reacts in the environment

Using ultrafast X-rays, scientists for the first time have watched how quickly electrons hop their way through rust nanoparticles.

September 6, 2012
Tao Sun and Jin Wang, scientists at Argonne National Laboratory, use the Advanced Photon Source to design and test a new technique for X-ray detection that for the first time allows 3-D reconstructions of surface material with high-resolution.
Nano, photonic research gets boost from new 3-D visualization technology

For the first time, X-ray scientists have combined high-resolution imaging with 3-D viewing of the surface layer of material using X-ray vision in a way that does not damage the sample.

August 29, 2012
Kathleen Carrado Gregar has been elected to the 2012 class of Fellows of the American Chemical Society.
Carrado Gregar inducted into American Chemical Society

Kathleen Carrado Gregar, the User and Outreach Programs Manager at the Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne, has been elected to the 2012 class of Fellows of the American Chemical Society.

August 2, 2012
Four Argonne National Laboratory scientists receive Early Career Research Program awards

Four researchers at Argonne have received 2012 Early Career Research Program awards, granted to exceptional researchers beginning their careers.

May 10, 2012
Deep canyons can be etched into materials at the nanoscale with a new SIS-based lithography technique by Argonne scientists.
Argonne nanoscientists invent better etching technique

Imagine yourself nano-sized, standing on the edge of a soon-to-be computer chip. Down shoots a beam of electrons, carving precise topography that is then etched the depth of the Grand Canyon into the chip.

August 18, 2011
John Bahns, Subramanian Sankaranarayanan, Liaohai Chen and Stephen Gray find new way to assemble nanoparticles.
Scientists use light to join nanoparticles into new materials

For many years, scientists have searched for ways to assemble nanoparticles—tiny bits of matter less than a millionth of an inch across—into larger structures of any desired shape and form at will. This effect has been achieved in a new study by using a laser as if it were a magic wand, creating an assembled, continuous filament as the laser beam is moved around.

March 14, 2011