Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

Date Postedsort ascending
John Carlisle, director of Chain Reaction Innovations (CRI) at Argonne, is seen here introducing the opening of the second CRI cohort pitch on February 7. Six innovators were chosen from that competition and will work to grow their technologies at Argonne over the next two years. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne selects innovators from across nation to grow startups

Argonne announces second cohort of Chain Reaction Innovations.

April 18, 2018
This shows the reaction mechanism for converting hydrogen fluoride (HF) impurity from the electrolyte into lithium fluoride (LiF) in the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) with release of hydrogen gas (H<sub>2</sub>). The SEI layer is shown on a substrate of gold (Au) atoms, which serves as a simplified model system. Scientists determined this mechanism using advanced computational methods (density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations). (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Battery’s hidden layer revealed

An international team led by Argonne National Laboratory makes breakthrough in understanding the chemistry of the microscopically thin layer that forms between the liquid electrolyte and solid electrode in lithium-ion batteries. The results are being used in improving the layer and better predicting battery lifetime.

April 17, 2018
Susan Bettenhausen (left), William Jansma (right) and Matthew Kasa (center) work on the helical superconducting undulator being readied for installation at Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory / Richard Fenner.)
Sending electrons on a roller-coaster ride

A first-of-its-kind X-ray instrument for frontier research with high-brightness X-rays is now in operation at Argonne National Laboratory. The new device uses a unique superconducting technology that speeds electrons on a path much like that of a roller coaster.

April 11, 2018
For the first time, Argonne scientists and other collaborators observed the mirror-like physics of the superconductor-insulator transition. They now see it operates exactly as expected. (Image by Shutterstock / ktsdesign.)
Mirror, Mirror

The mirror-like physics of the superconductor-insulator transition operates exactly as expected. Scientists know this to be true following the observation of a remarkable phenomenon, the existence of which was predicted three decades ago but that had eluded experimental detection until now. The observation confirms that two fundamental quantum states, superconductivity and superinsulation, both arise in mirror-like images of each other.

April 6, 2018
Argonne’s Suzanne te Velthuis and Stephan Rosenkranz have been named fellows of the Neutron Scattering Society of America (NSSA). (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Doing the neutron dance

Two materials scientists, Suzanne te Velthuis and Stephan Rosenkranz, have been named fellows of the Neutron Scattering Society of America (NSSA).

April 4, 2018
In 2017, Kansas State University tied for 2nd place at Argonne’s second annual Cyber Defense Competition. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
University teams to compete in Department of Energy’s 2018 National Cyber Defense Competition

The U.S. Department of Energy is proud to announce the 29 university teams selected to compete in the third annual Cyber Defense Competition (CDC), taking place April 6–7, 2018.

April 2, 2018
This shows electron microscopy of cross-linked titania nanoparticles with boron-based clusters. Argonne researchers helped create a method to build these networks. (Image courtesy of UCLA / Alexander Spokoyny.)
What a mesh

A team of scientists from across the U.S. has found a new way to create molecular interconnections that can give a certain class of materials exciting new properties, including improving their ability to catalyze chemical reactions or harvest energy from light.

March 29, 2018
Argonne researchers helped identify the process by which holes get trapped in nanoparticles made of zinc oxide, a material of potential interest for solar applications because it absorbs ultraviolet light. (Image by Christopher Milne.)
It’s a trap!

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have published a new study that identifies the process by which holes get trapped in nanoparticles made of zinc oxide, a material of potential interest for solar applications because it absorbs ultraviolet light.

March 27, 2018
Researchers from Argonne and the University of California at Santa Barbara have identified another elemental actor that helps activate palladium while reducing the amount of the precious metal needed for reactions to occur. (Image by Shutterstock / clearviewstock.)
Nickel in the X-ray limelight

Argonne scientists and collaborators have identified another elemental actor in catalytic reactions that helps activate palladium while reducing the amount of the precious metal needed for those reactions to occur.

March 26, 2018
Using Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source, researchers identified a form of water known as Ice-VII, which was trapped within diamonds that crystallized deep in the Earth’s mantle. (Image courtesy of the University of Chicago.)
Argonne’s powerful X-rays key to confirming water source deep below Earth’s surface

A study published in Science last week relies on extremely bright X-ray beams from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory to confirm the presence of naturally occurring water at least 410 kilometers below the Earth’s surface. This exciting discovery could change our understanding of how water circulates deep in the Earth’s mantle and how heat escapes from the lower regions of our planet.

March 23, 2018