Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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Jeffrey L. Binder has been appointed new Associate Laboratory Director for Energy and Global Security at Argonne. (Photo by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory)
Argonne appoints new associate laboratory director for energy and global security

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory announces the appointment of Jeffrey L. Binder to the position of Associate Laboratory Director for Energy and Global Security (EGS).

September 21, 2016
A new study by Argonne researchers determined that magnetic skyrmions – small electrically uncharged circular structures with a spiraling magnetic pattern – do get deflected by an applied current, much like a curveball getting deflected by air. (Photo by Mark Lopez, Argonne National Laboratory)
Argonne ahead of the “curve” in magnetic study

In a new study by Argonne researchers, scientists noticed that magnetic skyrmions – small electrically uncharged circular structures with a spiraling magnetic pattern – do get deflected by an applied current, much like a curveball gets deflected by airflow.

September 21, 2016
Former Argonne postdoctoral researcher Diana Berman and Argonne nanoscientist Anirudha Sumant, along with several collaborators, developed a new and inexpensive way to grow pure graphene using a diamond substrate. (Wes Agresta/Argonne National Laboratory)
Diamond proves useful material for growing graphene

A team has developed a method to grow graphene that contains relatively few impurities, and costs less to make, in a shorter time and at lower temperatures compared to the processes widely used to make graphene today.

September 16, 2016
A new study from Argonne National Laboratory has shown water can serve a previously undiscovered role to help micelles coalesce to spontaneously form long fibers. The study could help scientists to understand how light-harvesting molecules are incorporated into the micelle fiber as it assembles, which would be a key step to understanding some forms of artificial photosynthesis. (Image courtesy of Robert Horn/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Water helps assembly of biofibers that could capture sunlight

A new study from Argonne National Laboratory has shown water can serve a previously undiscovered role to help micelles coalesce to spontaneously form long fibers. The study could help scientists to understand how light-harvesting molecules are incorporated into the micelle fiber as it assembles, which would be a key step to understanding some forms of artificial photosynthesis.

September 12, 2016
Argonne National Laboratory mechanical engineer Wenhua Yu prepares to test a prototype thermal energy storage system developed at Argonne that will charge and discharge 20 times faster than current high-efficiency latent heat thermal energy storage systems. Testing validates the amount of thermal energy that can be stored and how efficiently it can be recovered for concentrated solar power and other potential applications.
Argonne technology puts solar power to work all night long

Current thermal energy storage systems for solar power plants rely on materials of low energy density and thermal conductivity, requiring more material at greater cost to meet storage requirements. To combat this challenge, researchers at Argonne National Laboratory designed an inexpensive thermal energy storage system that will be significantly smaller with over 20 times better thermal performance than current systems.

September 12, 2016
To understand how molecules undergo light-driven chemical transformations, scientists need to be able to follow the atoms and electrons within the energized molecule as it gains and loses energy. In a recent study, a team of researchers at Argonne, Northwestern University and the Technical University of Denmark used the ultrafast high-intensity pulsed X-rays produced by the Linac Coherent Light Source to take molecular snapshots of these molecules. (Illustration by Scott Nychay.)
Seeing energized light-active molecules proves quick work for Argonne scientists

To understand how molecules undergo light-driven chemical transformations, scientists need to be able to follow the atoms and electrons within the energized molecule as it gains and loses energy. In a recent study, a team of researchers at Argonne, Northwestern University and the Technical University of Denmark used the ultrafast high-intensity pulsed X-rays produced by the Linac Coherent Light Source to take molecular snapshots of these molecules.

September 8, 2016
This image shows the distribution of clumps of matter in the full "Outer Rim" simulation, one of the world's largest simulations of the cosmos. Outer Rim was carried out on the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility’s Mira supercomputer. (Credit: Visualization by Silvio Rizzi and Joe Insley, Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF); simulation by the HACC team.)
Two Argonne-led projects among $39.8 million in first-round Exascale Computing Project awards

The Exascale Computing Project today announced its first round of funding with the selection of application development proposals, including three Argonne-led projects.

September 7, 2016
Julie Nuter has been appointed chief human resources officer at Argonne National Laboratory.
Nuter is new Argonne chief human resources officer

Julie Nuter has been appointed chief human resources officer at Argonne National Laboratory, effective August 29, 2016.

September 6, 2016
Researchers with the Argonne Center for Collaborative Energy Storage Science (ACCESS) will partner with industry to improve lead-acid battery performance. (Photo: Shutterstock)
Lead-acid battery companies join forces with Argonne National Laboratory to enhance battery performance

Exploring the unrealized potential of lead batteries is the goal of a new collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory and two leading lead recycling and lead battery manufacturing companies, RSR Technologies and East Penn Manufacturing.

September 1, 2016
Trying to understand a system of atoms is like herding gnats – the individual atoms are never at rest and are constantly moving and interacting. When it comes to trying to model the properties and behavior of these kinds of systems, scientists use two fundamentally different pictures of reality, one of which is called “statistical” and the other “dynamical.” The two approaches have at times been at odds, but scientists from Argonne recently announced a way to reconcile the two pictures.
Argonne theorists solve a long-standing fundamental problem

Trying to understand a system of atoms is like herding gnats – the individual atoms are never at rest and are constantly moving and interacting. When it comes to trying to model the properties and behavior of these kinds of systems, scientists use two fundamentally different pictures of reality, one of which is called “statistical” and the other “dynamical.” The two approaches have at times been at odds, but Argonne scientists have announced a way to reconcile the two pictures.

August 30, 2016