Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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Switchgrass is one of the five crops modeled for local soil carbon sequestration rates in an Argonne study that predicts the impact of different biofuel crops on soil carbon across the country. (photo credit: hjochen/Shutterstock)
Modeling predicts which counties could store more carbon in soil by growing bioenergy crops

To help stakeholders in government and business make smart decisions about the best types of land and local climates for planting bioenergy crops, researchers at Argonne are using computational modeling to predict which counties could see increases in soil organic carbon from cultivation of crops for biofuels.

July 13, 2016
In a new study, researchers at Argonne have developed a rational approach to optimizing the arrangement of defects in commercial high-temperature superconducting wires to enhance their current-carrying capacity. This snapshot of a simulation shows the defects in the material, here in gray, and pinning vortices, in red. The pinning enhances the superconducting behavior of the material at high magnetic fields.
Scientists optimize defects for better superconducting effects

In a new study, researchers at Argonne National Laboratory have developed a rational approach to optimize the arrangement of defects to enhance the current-carrying capacity of commercial high-temperature superconducting wires.

July 12, 2016
Chemist Trevor Dzwiniel develops processes for scaling up production of an electrolyte material for batteries in the Materials Engineering Research Facility at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is teaming up with Strem Chemicals, Inc., to provide industry and the battery research community with next-generation materials that could improve energy storage. (Photo by Wes Agresta; click to view larger.)
Argonne partners with Strem Chemicals to deliver next-gen battery materials to industry

Argonne has teamed up with Strem Chemicals, Inc. to provide industry and the battery research community with next-generation materials that could improve energy storage. Strem has licensed 23 separate pieces of intellectual property from Argonne and will manufacture and distribute 9 battery solvents and additives.

July 8, 2016
Argonne National Laboratory will be working with four small businesses on nuclear technology projects under the auspices of DOE’s Gateway for Accelerated Innovation in Nuclear (GAIN).
Argonne to work with small businesses on nuclear technologies

Argonne will be working with four small businesses on nuclear technology projects under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Gateway for Accelerated Innovation in Nuclear (GAIN).

July 6, 2016
Among the projects that are being supported as part of the first round of funding from DOE's Technology Commercialization Fund is a collaboration between Argonne and ZeaChem, Inc., aimed at improving the processing of biomass-based feedstocks into biofuels and chemicals. (Scanrail1/Shutterstock)
DOE commits more than $1.7 million to help commercialize promising Argonne-associated energy technologies

The U.S. Department of Energy announced that it is committing more than $1.7 million in funding to help Argonne and research partners move multiple promising energy technologies to the marketplace. News of the Argonne awards was part of a larger announcement by DOE that, through the first round of funding from its Technology Commercialization Fund, it will award nearly $16 million to support 54 projects at 12 national labs involving dozens of research partners.

June 27, 2016
A team led by researchers from the Argonne National Laboratory used the high-intensity, quick-burst X-rays provided by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to look at how the atoms in a molecule change when the molecule is bombarded with X-rays. This schematic shows the dissociation of a xenon difluoride molecule during the X-ray pump/X-ray probe process.
New X-ray method allows scientists to probe molecular explosions

A team led by researchers from Argonne used the high-intensity, quick-burst X-rays provided by the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to look at how the atoms in a molecule change when the molecule is bombarded with X-rays.

June 15, 2016
Researchers used powerful X-rays to take a molecular look at how the Kaiser-i-Hind butterfly’s wings reflect in brilliant iridescent green. Image: Shutterstock/Butterfly Hunter.
X-rays reveal the photonic crystals in butterfly wings that create color

Scientists used X-rays to discover what creates one butterfly effect: how the microscopic structures on the insect’s wings reflect light to appear as brilliant colors to the eye.

June 10, 2016
Argonne physicist Jeff Eastman holds a thin oxide film which dramatically increases its conductivity when a small current is applied. The discovery could be useful in studies for better electronics or catalysts. Photo by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.
A new way to control oxygen for electronic properties

Researchers at Argonne found they could use a small electric current to introduce oxygen voids, or vacancies, that dramatically change the conductivity of thin oxide films.

June 9, 2016
Principal chemical engineer Jie Li, left, and postdoctoral researcher Alina Yan create coated nanoparticles in a continuous flow reactor. Nanoparticles are key to an ongoing effort at Argonne to create more efficient window films.
Through a glass, warmly: Argonne nanomaterials can help make windows more efficient

A team of Argonne researchers is using nanomaterials to get closer to one of the holy grails of building efficiency technologies: single-pane windows with efficiency as good or better than multipane low-emission windows. The team recently received a $3.1 million award from DOE’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy to develop a technology that could help achieve that goal.

May 31, 2016
From left, researchers Ani Sumant, Ali Erdemir, Subramanian Sankaranarayanan, Sanket Deshmukh, and Diana Berman combined diamond, graphene, and carbon to achieve superlubricity.
Argonne-developed technology for achieving superlubricity wins 2016 TechConnect National Innovation Award

A graphene-nanodiamond solution for achieving superlubricity developed at Argonne National Laboratory has won a 2016 TechConnect National Innovation Award. Using miniscule diamonds wrapped in graphene, friction can be reduced to almost zero value. This superlubricity effect is a very enticing prospect for industries making everything from computer hard drives to wind turbines.

May 26, 2016