Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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Argonne research shows that we can generate energy and mitigate methane emissions from food waste. (Image by Shutterstock/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Trash to treasure: The benefits of waste-to-energy technologies

Using landfill waste to produce energy generates less greenhouse gases than simply letting the waste decompose. The study highlights the benefits of food waste as a potential source of energy.

August 25, 2017
Matt Dietrich is a physicist in Argonne’s Physics Division. His research into new physics beyond the Standard Model, which could provide clues as to why matter dominates our universe, earned him a 2017 DOE Early Career Research award. (Image courtesy of Matt Dietrich.)
Two Argonne scientists receive DOE Early Career Research Program awards

Argonne scientists Matt Dietrich and Tom Peterka have received DOE Early Career Research Program awards. Peterka was awarded for his work to redefine scientific data models to be communicated, stored and analyzed more efficiently. Dietrich was recognized for his work probing potential new physics beyond the Standard Model that could help explain why matter came to dominate the universe.

August 22, 2017
An electron microscope captured this image of a freshly grown batch of nanowires using the NextGen STEM Kit’s star-shaped mold. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Nanotechnology moves from the clean room to the classroom

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory and United Scientific Supplies, Inc. are introducing high school students to nanoscience with a new hands-on product.

August 18, 2017
During his 15-year career at Argonne, Seth Darling has made a notable impact as a scientist within the Nanoscience and Technology Division and at the Center for Nanoscale Materials. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Seth Darling named Director of the Institute for Molecular Engineering at Argonne

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory has named Seth Darling as Director of the Institute for Molecular Engineering at Argonne (IME at Argonne), effective immediately. IME at Argonne is the Argonne-based partner to the Institute for Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago.

August 15, 2017
Cristina Negri has been named division director of the Environmental Sciences division at Argonne effective August 14, 2017. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Cristina Negri named Environmental Science division director

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory has named M. Cristina Negri the next director of the laboratory’s Environmental Science Division (EVS), effective August 14, 2017.

July 31, 2017
Researchers at Argonne looked at the dynamics of the transport of certain elements – especially rubidium – at the interface between water and mica, a flat transparent mineral pictured above. (Image by Beth Harvey/Shutterstock.)
Mica provides clue to how water transports minerals

In a new study from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Delaware, chemists have been able to look at the interface between water and muscovite mica, a flat mineral commonly found in granite, soils and many sediments. In particular, the researchers looked at the capture and release of rubidium – a metal closely related to but more easily singled out than common elements like potassium and sodium.

July 13, 2017
Argonne, the University of Chicago and Fermilab are launching an intellectual hub called the Chicago Quantum Exchange to advance academic, industrial and governmental efforts in the science and engineering of quantum information. Above: An illustration of a blinking quantum dot in its 'on’ state. (Image courtesy of Nicholas Brawand).
Chicago Quantum Exchange to create technologically transformative ecosystem

The University of Chicago is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to launch an intellectual hub for advancing academic, industrial and governmental efforts in the science and engineering of quantum information.

June 20, 2017
Materials scientists at Argonne National Laboratory synthesized single crystals of a metallic trilayer nickelate compound, which shows similarities to a technologically valuable class of materials called high-temperature superconductors – and with the right ingredients, could potentially become one. Above: The crystal structure of such a compound. (Image credit: Zhang et. al, published in <em>Nature Physics</em>.)
Nickel for thought: Compound shows potential for high-temperature superconductivity

Argonne researchers have identified a nickel oxide compound as an unconventional but promising candidate material for high-temperature superconductivity. The project combined crystal growth, X-ray spectroscopy and computational theory.

June 16, 2017
Venkat Srinivasan, director of Argonne Collaborative Center for Energy Storage Science (ACCESS), speaks with a researcher in one of Argonne’s battery discovery laboratories. Srinivasan will speak about partnering opportunities with Argonne at Battery Industry Day on June 14. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne hosts Battery Industry Day to boost collaboration

Argonne will highlight its array of innovative battery work – including its revolutionary Nickel Manganese Cobalt blended cathode structure – during Battery Industry Day on Wednesday, June 14.

June 14, 2017
Image of the Lassa virus glycoprotein structure, which is the viral machinery that Lassa virus uses to enter human cells. Researchers hope studies led by researchers at the Scripps Research Institute and partially done at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne could lead to therapies for the disease, which kills thousands every year. (Image courtesy of Scripps Research Institute.)
Argonne X-rays used to help identify a key Lassa virus structure

Research done at Argonne National Laboratory’s Advanced Photon Source was vital to the process of identifying the structure, which provides a guide for designing a Lassa virus vaccine. Lassa virus is endemic to Africa and kills thousands of people a year; it is particularly deadly for pregnant women.

June 13, 2017