Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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This image shows an atomic-resolution topographic rendering of the borophene surface, taken in the scanning tunneling microscope. The borophene sheet forms large buckled wrinkles, as seen in the center, in response to the underlying silver crystal. These atomic scale wrinkles may serve to steer the flow of electrons and could lead to other surprising properties. (Click to view larger.)
Scientists create atomically thin metallic boron

A team of scientists at Argonne, Northwestern University and Stony Brook University has, for the first time, created a two-dimensional sheet of boron – a material known as borophene.

December 21, 2015
Cast iron can be modified through the manufacturing process to optimize its mechanical and physical properties, such as strength and durability. This property makes it a material of choice for use in the transportation and machinery industries, which rely on cast iron's resistance to wear, deformation, and rusting to design high-performance bridges, tools, and engine parts.
High-energy X-rays give industry affordable way to optimize cast iron

Researchers from Caterpillar and Argonne conducted a proof-of-principle study that shows that high-energy synchrotron X-rays from the Advanced Photon Source can provide a new, affordable way for industry to optimize the mechanical and physical properties of cast iron in the manufacturing process.

December 7, 2015
This light micrograph shows a region of the chiton’s shell surface with multiple small dark-pigmented eyes composed of aragonite, the same biomineral that also makes up the rest of the shell. Credit: Wyss Institute at Harvard University.
Protective shell of a sea-dwelling chiton paves the way towards new materials

Taking a cue from nature, a cross-institutional collaboration involving researchers from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard and MIT has deciphered how the biomineral making up the body armor of a chiton mollusk has evolved to create functional eyes embedded in the animal’s protective shell.

December 1, 2015
“Just about all of the really significant innovation we have seen over the last four or five decades has been the result of research that preceded that by 10, 20, or even 50 years,” said Suresh Sunderrajan, director of Argonne’s Technology Development and Commercialization division.
Technologist in Residence pilot program pairs companies with national labs to advance clean energy

The U.S. Department of Energy recently selected representatives from Argonne for three of seven spots in its new Technologist in Residence pilot program, created to increase collaboration between the national laboratories and private-sector companies.

December 1, 2015
Members of the Intermediate Energy X-ray collaborative development team standing in front of the beamline. Left to right: Jessica McChesney, Yizhi Fang, Tim Roberts, Mohan Ramanathan, Mike Fisher, Fanny Rodolakis, and Ruben Reininger.
Novel intermediate energy X-ray beamline opening for researchers

Researchers working to create innovative electronic systems and to understand the fundamental properties of magnetism and electronics to tackle grand challenges such as quantum computing have an new tool in their arsenal.

November 20, 2015
The Binary Pseudo-Random Calibration Tool provides the highest resolution ever achieved, 1.5 nanometers, and is used to characterize all advanced imaging systems from interferometers to electron microscopes. Pictured is lithographically produced BPR grating for investigating interferometers.
Argonne researchers win two R&D 100 Awards

Innovative technologies developed by researchers at Argonne and their partners earned two 2015 R&D 100 Awards.

November 16, 2015
Occidental College researcher Janet Scheel will use Argonne Leadership Computing Facility resources for her 2016 INCITE project “Convective Turbulence in Liquid Gallium and Sodium.” This image displays streamlines of the two-dimensional skin friction field that was obtained right at the heated bottom plate of a cylindrical cell for turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in liquid mercury at a Rayleigh number of a hundred million. The field displays the complex dynamics of the velocity field. (Image credit: Joerg Schumacher, Technische Universitaet Ilmenau)
INCITE grants awarded to 56 computational research projects

The U.S. Department of Energy has announced 56 projects aimed at accelerating discovery and innovation to address some of the world’s most challenging scientific questions. The projects will share 5.8 billion core hours on America’s two most powerful supercomputers dedicated to open science.

November 13, 2015
In this artistic rendering, a magnetic pulse (right) and X-ray laser light (left) converge on a high-temperature superconductor to study the behavior of its electrons. (Courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory) (Click image to enlarge.)
An unprecedented blend of intense magnetic and X-ray laser pulses produces surprising 3D effect

A team led by scientists at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory combined powerful magnetic pulses with some of the brightest X-rays on the planet to discover a surprising 3D arrangement of a material’s electrons that appears closely linked to a mysterious phenomenon known as high-temperature superconductivity.

November 5, 2015
Scientists determined the structures of several important tuberculosis enzymes, which could lead to new drugs for the disease. Above: An image of the mycobacterium IMPDH complex when it is attached to IMP and the inhibitor MAD1. Courtesy Youngchang Kim/Argonne National Laboratory. Click to view larger.
Study reveals structure of tuberculosis enzyme, could offer drug target

A team of scientists, including several from Argonne, have determined the structures of several important tuberculosis enzymes, which could lead to new drugs for the disease.

November 2, 2015
U.S. scientists — including microbiologists, physicists, chemists and physicians — announce the creation of the Unified Microbiome Initiative (UMI), an interdisciplinary group that will coordinate areas of microbial research and make funding recommendations to federal agencies, private foundations, and corporate partners.
Scientists call for unified initiative to advance microbiome research

Leading scientists have formed a unified initiative to support basic research, technological development, and commercial applications to better understand and harness the capabilities of Earth’s vast systems of microorganisms.

October 28, 2015