Press Releases

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Argonne materials scientists announced a new technique to grow these little forests at the microscale (the scale shows 100 micrometers, which is about the diameter of a single human hair). Image by Arnaud Demortière, Alexey Snezhko and Igor Aronson. Click to enlarge.
Good hair day: New technique grows tiny 'hairy' materials at the microscale

Scientists at Argonne attacked a tangled problem by developing a new technique to grow tiny “hairy” materials that assemble themselves at the microscale.

January 31, 2014
Argonne researchers Michael Thackeray (left) and Khalil Amine, along with others at Argonne, co-developed battery materials that improve battery range and reliability, while simultaneously improving safety and reducing manufacturing cost. Click to enlarge.
Argonne battery technology confirmed by U.S. Patent Office

The U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory is pleased to announce that after a careful reexamination of the relevant prior patents and publications, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has confirmed the novelty of U.S. Patent 6,677,082.

January 29, 2014
Most simple solar cells handle the bluish hues of the electromagnetic spectrum inefficiently. This is because blue photons — incoming particles of light that strike the solar cell — actually have excess energy that a conventional solar cell can’t capture. Click to enlarge.
New solar cell technology captures high-energy photons more efficiently

Scientists at Argonne and the University of Texas at Austin have together developed a new, inexpensive material that has the potential to capture and convert solar energy — particularly from the bluer part of the spectrum — much more efficiently than ever before.

January 23, 2014
Katherine Harkay’s induction as an APS Fellow comes as a result of her impact on the field of accelerator physics. Click to enlarge.
Three Argonne scientists named fellows of the American Physical Society for 2013

Three scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory have been named fellows of the American Physical Society for 2013.

January 21, 2014
Meimei Li’s research focuses on structural materials for nuclear reactors. Click to enlarge.
Nuclear engineer Li wins Presidential Early Career Award

Argonne nuclear engineer Meimei Li has received a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers for her contributions to the understanding of nuclear reactor materials.

January 15, 2014
Currently, the most efficient methods we have for making fuel – principally, hydrogen – from sunlight and water involve rare and expensive metal catalysts, such as platinum. Click to enlarge.
Cobalt catalysts allow researchers to duplicate the complicated steps of photosynthesis

In a new study, Argonne researchers have used cobalt catalysts to duplicate the steps in the complicated electronic dance of photosynthesis.

January 13, 2014
Asian carp and other aquatic nuisance species species have become a major problem on the Mississippi River, and they threaten to invade the Great Lakes. Click to enlarge. Image credit: Shutterstock
Report offers Congress alternatives to corral Asian carp and other aquatic nuisance species

Argonne’s Environmental Science Division has been working with the Chicago District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on the Great Lakes and Mississippi River Interbasin Study to determine the risks that aquatic nuisance species, such as Asian carp, will move between the two basins through aquatic pathways.

January 8, 2014
Ribbon representation of an amyloid beta fibril, formed by misfolded proteins that clump together. These structures are associated with conditions like type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease.
A wrong molecular turn leads down the path to type 2 diabetes

Computing resources at Argonne have helped researchers better grasp how proteins misfold to create the tissue-damaging structures that lead to type 2 diabetes.

December 20, 2013
Protein crystal samples are placed on a small metal tip so X-rays from the adjacent beam pipe can pass through them and diffract off the atoms inside the crystal. Using computers, scientists interpret the scattered light patterns recorded by detectors to create a picture of how the atoms are located inside the crystal. Click to enlarge.
Lessening X-ray damage is healthy for protein discovery data too

New recommendations for using X-rays promise to speed investigations aimed at understanding the structure and function of biologically important proteins – information critical to the development of new drugs.

December 16, 2013
An illustration of the perovskite crystal fabricated in the experiment. Click to enlarge. Image credit: Felice Macera.
A new material for solar panels could make them cheaper, more efficient

A unique solar panel design made with a new ceramic material points the way to potentially providing sustainable power cheaper, more efficiently, and requiring less manufacturing time. It also reaches a four-decade-old goal of discovering a bulk photovoltaic material that can harness energy from visible and infrared light, not just ultraviolet light.

December 11, 2013