Press Releases

Date Postedsort ascending
One of the metallic samples studied, niobium diselenide, is seen here–the square in the center–as prepared for an X-ray diffraction experiment. Credit: University of Chicago/Argonne National Laboratory. Click image to view larger.
Caltech announces discovery in fundamental physics

Scientists recently used the Advanced Photon Source to investigate the existence of instabilities in the arrangement of the electrons in metals as a function of both temperature and pressure, and to pinpoint, for the first time, how those instabilities arise.

August 18, 2015
The unit cell of the nickelate NdNiO3 is shown with Nd represented by blue, O by red and Ni by green. The Ni electron density (green) is believed to transfer to the Nd (blue) during the metal-insulator transition. (Image courtesy Mary Upton; click to view larger.)
Insight into obscure transition uncovered by X-rays

The list of potential mechanisms that underlie an unusual metal-insulator transition has been narrowed by a team of scientists using a combination of X-ray techniques. This transition has ramifications for material design for electronics and sensors.

August 12, 2015
Argonne researchers are able to fold gold nanoparticle membranes in a specific direction using an electron beam because two sides of the membrane are different. Image credit: Xiao-Min Lin et. al, taken at Argonne’s Electron Microscopy Center. (Click image to view larger.)
Bend me, shape me, any way you want me: Scientists curve nanoparticle sheets into complex forms

Scientists have been making nanoparticles for more than two decades in two-dimensional sheets, three-dimensional crystals and random clusters. But they have never been able to get a sheet of nanoparticles to curve or fold into a complex three-dimensional structure. Now researchers from the University of Chicago, the University of Missouri and Argonne have found a simple way to do exactly that.

July 31, 2015
The 3D X-ray imaging technique used in the study shows how the defects move around inside the LNMO spinel as the battery is charged to higher voltages. (Image courtesy of Andrew Ulvestad/Department of Physics, Jacobs School of Engineering/UC San Diego; click to view larger.)
X-ray imaging reveals secrets in battery materials

In a new study, researchers explain why one particular cathode material works well at high voltages, while most other cathodes do not. The insights could help battery developers design rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that operate at higher voltages.

June 22, 2015
Stephen Streiffer has been named the Associate Laboratory Director for Photon Sciences and Director of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne. (Click image to view larger.)
Streiffer to lead Advanced Photon Source

Stephen Streiffer has been named the Associate Laboratory Director for Photon Sciences and Director of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory.

May 5, 2015
A team of researchers using the Advanced Photon Source, above, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, demonstrated unparalleled sensitivity for measuring the distribution of trace elements in thicker specimens at cryogenic temperatures.
X-ray ptychography, fluorescence microscopy combo sheds new light on trace elements

Scientists have developed a new approach that combines ptychographic X-ray imaging and fluorescence microscopy to study the important role trace elements play in biological functions on hydrated cells. A team of researchers using the Advanced Photon Source, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, demonstrated unparalleled sensitivity for measuring the distribution of trace elements in thicker specimens at cryogenic temperatures.

April 8, 2015
The synchrotron X-ray scanning tunneling microscopy concept allowed Argonne National Laboratory and Ohio University researchers to achieve a recording-breaking resolution of a nanoscale material. They combined of a synchrotron X-ray as a probe and a nanofabricated smart tip as a detector to fingerprint individual nickel clusters on a copper surface at a two-nanometer resolution and at the ultimate single-atomic height sensitivity. And by varying the photon energy, researchers successfully measured photoionization cross sections of a single nickel nanocluster – opening the door to new opportunities for chemical imaging of nanoscale materials. (Click image to enlarge)
Powerful new technique simultaneously determines nanomaterials' chemical makeup, topography

A team of researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and Ohio University have devised a powerful technique that simultaneously resolves the chemical characterization and topography of nanoscale materials down to the height of a single atom.

December 2, 2014
An Argonne-led research team found that when uranium dioxide melts, the number of oxygen atoms around uranium changes from eight-fold to a mixture of six- and sevenfold, which alters how it interacts with other materials. The discovery about will help scientists select the best computational model to use when simulating severe nuclear reactor accidents. (Click image to enlarge)
Discovery sheds light on nuclear reactor fuel behavior during a severe event

A new discovery about the atomic structure of uranium dioxide will help scientists select the best computational model to simulate severe nuclear reactor accidents.

November 20, 2014
Three-dimensional strain evolution in situ of a single LiNi<sub>0.5</sub>Mn<sub>1.5</sub>O<sub>4</sub> nanoparticle in a coin cell battery under operando conditions during charge/discharge cycles with coherent X-ray diffractive imaging. (Click image to enlarge)
New imaging capability reveals possible key to extending battery lifetime, capacity

A new method developed for studying battery failures points to a potential next step in extending lithium ion battery lifetime and capacity, opening a path to wider use of these batteries in conjunction with renewable energy sources

September 25, 2014
A mechanical stress testing setup with a custom-built compact furnace and cooling system that mimic extreme operating conditions on turbine engines at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Photo credit: DLR. (Click image to enlarge)
Novel capability enables first test of real turbine engine conditions

Manufacturers of turbine engines for airplanes, automobiles and electric generation plants could expedite the development of more durable, energy-efficient turbine blades thanks to a partnership between the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory, the German Aerospace Center and the universities of Central Florida and Cleveland State.

September 16, 2014