Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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Researchers using the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne have found a way to harness the quantum behavior of solid oxide fuel cells to make them even more efficient and robust. In doing so, they’ve observed a new type of phase transition in an oxide material.
Technique improves the efficacy of fuel cells

Researchers using the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne have found a way to harness the quantum behavior of solid oxide fuel cells to make them even more efficient and robust. In doing so, they’ve observed a new type of phase transition in an oxide material.

May 16, 2016
Argonne X-ray physicist Haidan Wen received a DOE Early Career Award, a prestigious research grant for $2.5 million over five years. Photo by Wes Agresta/Argonne National Laboratory; click to view larger.
X-ray scientist Haidan Wen wins DOE Early Career Award

Argonne X-ray physicist Haidan Wen received a DOE Early Career Award, a prestigious research grant for $2.5 million over five years.

May 3, 2016
Cast iron can be modified through the manufacturing process to optimize its mechanical and physical properties, such as strength and durability. This property makes it a material of choice for use in the transportation and machinery industries, which rely on cast iron's resistance to wear, deformation, and rusting to design high-performance bridges, tools, and engine parts.
High-energy X-rays give industry affordable way to optimize cast iron

Researchers from Caterpillar and Argonne conducted a proof-of-principle study that shows that high-energy synchrotron X-rays from the Advanced Photon Source can provide a new, affordable way for industry to optimize the mechanical and physical properties of cast iron in the manufacturing process.

December 7, 2015
This light micrograph shows a region of the chiton’s shell surface with multiple small dark-pigmented eyes composed of aragonite, the same biomineral that also makes up the rest of the shell. Credit: Wyss Institute at Harvard University.
Protective shell of a sea-dwelling chiton paves the way towards new materials

Taking a cue from nature, a cross-institutional collaboration involving researchers from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard and MIT has deciphered how the biomineral making up the body armor of a chiton mollusk has evolved to create functional eyes embedded in the animal’s protective shell.

December 1, 2015
Members of the Intermediate Energy X-ray collaborative development team standing in front of the beamline. Left to right: Jessica McChesney, Yizhi Fang, Tim Roberts, Mohan Ramanathan, Mike Fisher, Fanny Rodolakis, and Ruben Reininger.
Novel intermediate energy X-ray beamline opening for researchers

Researchers working to create innovative electronic systems and to understand the fundamental properties of magnetism and electronics to tackle grand challenges such as quantum computing have an new tool in their arsenal.

November 20, 2015
The Binary Pseudo-Random Calibration Tool provides the highest resolution ever achieved, 1.5 nanometers, and is used to characterize all advanced imaging systems from interferometers to electron microscopes. Pictured is lithographically produced BPR grating for investigating interferometers.
Argonne researchers win two R&D 100 Awards

Innovative technologies developed by researchers at Argonne and their partners earned two 2015 R&D 100 Awards.

November 16, 2015
One of the metallic samples studied, niobium diselenide, is seen here–the square in the center–as prepared for an X-ray diffraction experiment. Credit: University of Chicago/Argonne National Laboratory. Click image to view larger.
Caltech announces discovery in fundamental physics

Scientists recently used the Advanced Photon Source to investigate the existence of instabilities in the arrangement of the electrons in metals as a function of both temperature and pressure, and to pinpoint, for the first time, how those instabilities arise.

August 18, 2015
The unit cell of the nickelate NdNiO3 is shown with Nd represented by blue, O by red and Ni by green. The Ni electron density (green) is believed to transfer to the Nd (blue) during the metal-insulator transition. (Image courtesy Mary Upton; click to view larger.)
Insight into obscure transition uncovered by X-rays

The list of potential mechanisms that underlie an unusual metal-insulator transition has been narrowed by a team of scientists using a combination of X-ray techniques. This transition has ramifications for material design for electronics and sensors.

August 12, 2015
Argonne researchers are able to fold gold nanoparticle membranes in a specific direction using an electron beam because two sides of the membrane are different. Image credit: Xiao-Min Lin et. al, taken at Argonne’s Electron Microscopy Center. (Click image to view larger.)
Bend me, shape me, any way you want me: Scientists curve nanoparticle sheets into complex forms

Scientists have been making nanoparticles for more than two decades in two-dimensional sheets, three-dimensional crystals and random clusters. But they have never been able to get a sheet of nanoparticles to curve or fold into a complex three-dimensional structure. Now researchers from the University of Chicago, the University of Missouri and Argonne have found a simple way to do exactly that.

July 31, 2015
The 3D X-ray imaging technique used in the study shows how the defects move around inside the LNMO spinel as the battery is charged to higher voltages. (Image courtesy of Andrew Ulvestad/Department of Physics, Jacobs School of Engineering/UC San Diego; click to view larger.)
X-ray imaging reveals secrets in battery materials

In a new study, researchers explain why one particular cathode material works well at high voltages, while most other cathodes do not. The insights could help battery developers design rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that operate at higher voltages.

June 22, 2015