Press Releases

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Typically, the process of corrosion has been studied from the metal side of the equation. Click to enlarge.
The core of corrosion

Most times, the effects of corrosion are studied with regard to the metal surface. In a new study, researchers looked at the effects that corrosion has on the water and dissolved ions doing the corroding.

February 14, 2014
Argonne materials scientists announced a new technique to grow these little forests at the microscale (the scale shows 100 micrometers, which is about the diameter of a single human hair). Image by Arnaud Demortière, Alexey Snezhko and Igor Aronson. Click to enlarge.
Good hair day: New technique grows tiny 'hairy' materials at the microscale

Scientists at Argonne attacked a tangled problem by developing a new technique to grow tiny “hairy” materials that assemble themselves at the microscale.

January 31, 2014
Most simple solar cells handle the bluish hues of the electromagnetic spectrum inefficiently. This is because blue photons — incoming particles of light that strike the solar cell — actually have excess energy that a conventional solar cell can’t capture. Click to enlarge.
New solar cell technology captures high-energy photons more efficiently

Scientists at Argonne and the University of Texas at Austin have together developed a new, inexpensive material that has the potential to capture and convert solar energy — particularly from the bluer part of the spectrum — much more efficiently than ever before.

January 23, 2014
Currently, the most efficient methods we have for making fuel – principally, hydrogen – from sunlight and water involve rare and expensive metal catalysts, such as platinum. Click to enlarge.
Cobalt catalysts allow researchers to duplicate the complicated steps of photosynthesis

In a new study, Argonne researchers have used cobalt catalysts to duplicate the steps in the complicated electronic dance of photosynthesis.

January 13, 2014
Tijana Rajh is a senior scientist and group leader for the nanobio research interface group within Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials. Click to enlarge.
Argonne scientists Rajh, Soderholm and Segre named AAAS fellows

Physical chemist Tijana Rajh, chemist Lynda Soderholm and physicist Carlo Segre of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

December 6, 2013
In order to understand how complex materials merge at the boundary, scientists look at cross-sections of an oxide superlattices. In this picture, peaks correspond to layers of cuprate superconductor and valleys to metallic manganites (bottom region). The power of scanning tunneling microscopy allows researchers to gain insight into both the material's topography as well as its electronic properties. Click to enlarge.
A material's multiple personalities

Just like people, materials can sometimes exhibit “multiple personalities.” This kind of unusual behavior in a certain class of materials has compelled researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory to take a closer look at the precise mechanisms that govern the relationships between superconductivity and magnetism.

September 11, 2013
Argonne honors employees for outstanding performance

The UChicago Argonne, LLC, Board of Governors honors employees of Argonne National Laboratory for their distinguished performance, outstanding service to the laboratory, excellence in safety leadership, and education and academic scholarship.

August 15, 2013
The pink color of salt lakes is caused by salt-loving microorganisms, called halobacteria. To view a larger version of the image, click on it.
Microorganisms found in salt flats could offer new path to green hydrogen fuel

A protein found in the membranes of ancient microorganisms that live in desert salt flats could offer a new way of using sunlight to generate environmentally friendly hydrogen fuel, according to a new study by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory.

July 16, 2013
Jeff Elam (left) and Anil Mane’s work in nanocomposite charge drain coatings represents a significant breakthrough in Argonne's efforts to develop microelectromechanical systems, or MEMS. To view a larger version of the image, click on it.
Argonne claims four 2013 R&D 100 Awards

Four innovative technologies have won 2013 R&D 100 Awards, regarded as the “Oscars of invention,” for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory.

July 8, 2013
Postdoctoral researchers Marvin Cummings (at right) and Nozomi Shirato adjust the microscope before an experiment. To view a larger version of the image, click on it.
Scientists combine X-rays and microscopes for precise experiments

By pairing the capabilities of X-ray analysis and extremely precise microscopy, scientists at Argonne have developed a way to simultaneously determine the physical structure and chemical makeup of materials at close to the atomic level.

June 13, 2013