Press Releases

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This wafer of nanocrystalline diamond provides one example of the technology that AKHAN Semiconductor has licensed from Argonne. Photo courtesy of Ani Sumant. (Click image to enlarge)
Argonne announces new licensing agreement with AKHAN Semiconductor

Argonne has announced a new intellectual property licensing agreement with AKHAN Semiconductor, continuing a productive public-private partnership that will bring diamond-based semiconductor technologies to market.

November 19, 2014
The synchrotron X-ray scanning tunneling microscopy concept allowed Argonne National Laboratory and Ohio University researchers to achieve a recording-breaking resolution of a nanoscale material. They combined of a synchrotron X-ray as a probe and a nanofabricated smart tip as a detector to fingerprint individual nickel clusters on a copper surface at a two-nanometer resolution and at the ultimate single-atomic height sensitivity. And by varying the photon energy, researchers successfully measured photoionization cross sections of a single nickel nanocluster – opening the door to new opportunities for chemical imaging of nanoscale materials. (Click image to enlarge)
Powerful new technique simultaneously determines nanomaterials' chemical makeup, topography

A team of researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and Ohio University have devised a powerful technique that simultaneously resolves the chemical characterization and topography of nanoscale materials down to the height of a single atom.

December 2, 2014
This picture combines a transmission electron microscope image of a nanodumbbell with a gold domain oriented in  direction. The seed and gold domains in the dumbbell in the image on the right are identified by geometric phase analysis. Image credit: Soon Gu Kwon. (Click image to enlarge)
Atomic 'mismatch' creates nano 'dumbbells'

Thanks to a new study from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory, researchers are closer to understanding the process by which nanoparticles made of more than one material – called heterostructured nanoparticles – form.

December 4, 2014
Scientists at Argonne have created a new way of manipulating high-intensity X-rays, which will allow researchers to select extremely brief but precise X-ray bursts for their experiments.  This schematic of their microelectromechanical device consisting of a small oscillating mirror illustrates the reflection of an incoming X-ray at a particular critical angle. Image courtesy Daniel Lopez. (Click photo to view larger.)
Scientists tune X-rays with tiny mirrors

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have created a new way of manipulating high-intensity X-rays, which will allow researchers to select extremely brief but precise X-ray bursts for their experiments.

May 5, 2015