Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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Two Argonne physicists offered a way to mathematically describe a particular physics phenomenon called a phase transition in a system out of equilibrium (that is, with energy moving through it) by using imaginary numbers. The illustration relates the phase transition to the change between mathematical Mobius transformations (a, b, and c). The theory of out-of-equilibrium physics is a long-sought goal in the field, and could eventually help us design better electronics. (Image courtesy of Vinokur/Galda/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Study offers new theoretical approach to describing non-equilibrium phase transitions

Two physicists at Argonne offered a way to mathematically describe a particular physics phenomenon called a phase transition in a system out of equilibrium. Such phenomena are central in physics, and understanding how they occur has been a long-held and vexing goal; their behavior and related effects are key to unlocking possibilities for new electronics and other next-generation technologies.

April 26, 2017
A representation of the structure of a protein from the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, which causes foodborne illness, with an inhibitor molecule bound. (Image by Lizbeth Hedstrom (Brandeis University)/University of Chicago/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Battling infectious diseases with 3-D protein structures

A team of scientists used the Advanced Photon Source to find the 3-D structures of more than 1,000 proteins to be used for drug and vaccine research.

April 25, 2017
When manganese ions (gray) are stripped out of a battery’s cathode (blue), they can react with the battery’s electrolyte near the anode (gold), trapping lithium ions (green/yellow). (Image by Robert Horn/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Scientists identify chemical causes of battery “capacity fade”

Researchers at Argonne identified one of the major culprits in capacity fade of high-energy lithium-ion batteries.

April 25, 2017
Snapshots of the 3-D structure of iron nanoparticles in the course of the oxidation process, captured through large-scale reactive molecular dynamic simulations. These simulations enhance our understanding of processes like oxidation and corrosion, and build a foundation for developing integrated imaging techniques to control or manipulate these types of reactions. (Image by Subramanian Sankaranarayanan, Badri Narayanan, Yugang Sun, Xiaobing Zuo, Sheng Peng and Ganesh Kamath. Argonne National Laboratory/Temple University.)
New study reveals the mystery behind the formation of hollowed nanoparticles during metal oxidation

In a newly published Science paper, Argonne and Temple University researchers reveal new knowledge about the behavior of metal nanoparticles when they undergo oxidation, by integrating X-ray imaging and computer modeling and simulation. This knowledge adds to our understanding of fundamental processes like oxidation and corrosion.

April 21, 2017
Cross-section scanning electron microscopy image after hydrogen silsesquioxane patterning, sequential infiltration synthesis and removal of initiated chemical vapor deposition topcoat and organic components. (Image by Hyo Seon Suh / University of Chicago
Self-assembling polymers provide thin nanowire template

In a recent study, a team of researchers from Argonne, the University of Chicago and MIT has developed a new way to create some of the world’s thinnest wires, using a process that could enable mass manufacturing with standard types of equipment.

April 11, 2017
A Nobel Laureate and Argonne Distinguished Fellow, Alexei Abrikosov made significant contributions to the field of superconductivity.
Argonne scientist and Nobel Laureate Alexei Abrikosov dies at 88

Alexei Abrikosov, an acclaimed physicist at Argonne National Laboratory who received the 2003 Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on superconducting materials, died Wednesday, March 29. He was 88.

March 30, 2017
Valerie Taylor will be the next division director for Argonne’s Mathematics and Computer Science. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Valerie Taylor named Argonne National Laboratory’s Mathematics and Computer Science Division director

Computer scientist Valerie Taylor has been appointed as the next director of the Mathematics and Computer Science division at Argonne, effective July 3, 2017.

March 24, 2017
Argonne postdoctoral researcher Ed Barry wrings out a sheet of Oleo Sponge during tests at Argonne. Photo by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory; click to view larger.
Argonne invents reusable sponge that soaks up oil, could revolutionize oil spill and diesel cleanup

Scientists at Argonne have invented a new foam, called Oleo Sponge, that not only easily adsorbs spilled oil from water, but is also reusable and can pull dispersed oil from the entire water column—not just the surface.

March 6, 2017
Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory created tiny swirling vortices out of magnetic particles, providing insight into the behavior that governs such systems—which opens up new opportunities for materials and devices with new properties. Image courtesy Alexey Snezhko.
Researchers coax particles to form vortices using magnetic fields

Researchers at Argonne created tiny swirling vortices out of magnetic particles, providing insight into the behavior that governs such systems—which opens up new opportunities for materials and devices with new properties.

February 24, 2017
A team of researchers from Argonne, the Lille University of Science and Technology and the University of Picardie Jules Verne have laid out a theoretical map to use ferroelectric material (a class of materials whose polarization can be controlled with electric fields) to process information using multivalued logic – a leap beyond the simple ones and zeroes that make up our current computing systems that could let us process information much more efficiently. The diagram shows the configurations (yellow dots) where stable energy positions could allow us to encode information in thin films of ferroelectric material. (Image credit: Baudry/Lukyanchuk/Vinokur.)
New study of ferroelectrics offers roadmap to multivalued logic for neuromorphic computing

Research published Wednesday in Nature Scientific Reports lays out a theoretical map to use ferroelectric material to process information using multivalued logic – a leap beyond the simple ones and zeroes that make up our current computing systems that could let us process information much more efficiently.

February 10, 2017