Press Releases

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The research seeks to create a fuel cell that would both produce electricity and convert methane gas to ethane or ethylene that could then be converted to a liquid fuel or valuable chemicals. These cells could use natural gas—which is mostly made up of methane, above—directly.
Turning methane into usable liquid fuel: Illinois Institute of Technology and Argonne to receive $2M for hybrid fuel cells

Researchers from Argonne and the Illinois Institute of Technology were awarded $2 million over the course of two years to fund studies on hybrid fuel cells from ARPA-E.

August 4, 2014
A false-color image of a microelectromechanical device. The diamond-based actuator is colored gold. Click to enlarge. Image credit: Ani Sumant.
Thin diamond films provide new material for micro-machines

Researchers at the Center for Nanoscale Materials at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory and a handful of other institutions around the world have directed their focus to exploring microelectromechanical systems made of a relatively new material known as ultrananocrystalline diamond, which is a smooth and wear-resistant diamond thin film.

July 31, 2014
Researchers at Argonne, as part of the new Virtual Engine Research Institute and Fuels Initiative (VERIFI), are looking at a number of parameters in the internal combustion process. VERIFI is the first and only source in the world for high-fidelity, three-dimensional, end-to-end combustion engine simulation/visualization and simultaneous powertrain and fuel simulation, with uncertainty analysis. Click to enlarge.
New Argonne initiative to examine the details of the combustion process

Researchers at Argonne, as part of the new Virtual Engine Research Institute and Fuels Initiative (VERIFI), are looking at a number of parameters in the internal combustion process. VERIFI is the first and only source in the world for high-fidelity, three-dimensional, end-to-end combustion engine simulation/visualization and simultaneous powertrain and fuel simulation, with uncertainty analysis.

July 15, 2014
University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point chemistry professor Michael Zach (left) and Argonne nanoscientist Ani Sumant pose with their R&D 100 award-winning “NanoFab lab…in a box!” Click to enlarge. Photo credit: Mark Lopez.
Argonne wins three R&D 100 awards

Argonne wins three 2014 R&D 100 awards.

July 11, 2014
The NMDA receptor is a massive, multi-subunit complex. CSHL researchers found that it looks much like a hot air balloon. The upper, balloon-like portion of the structure is found outside the cell and responds to chemical messengers. Those messengers act like a key to unlock the lower portion of the receptor. This lower portion, corresponding to the basket of the hot air balloon, is embedded in the neuron’s membrane. It creates a narrow channel that allows ions, or electrically charged atoms, to flow into the cell. These many subunit interactions are potential targets for drug discovery. Click to enlarge.
Unprecedented detail of intact neuronal receptor offers blueprint for drug developers

Scientists succeeded in obtaining an unprecedented view of a type of brain-cell receptor that is implicated in a range of neurological illnesses, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, depression, schizophrenia, autism, and ischemic injuries associated with stroke.

July 7, 2014
Experts are developing new engine combustion models that incorporate accurate descriptions of two-phase flows, chemistry, transport phenomena and device geometries to provide predictive simulations of engine and fuel performance. Click to enlarge.
Caterpillar, Argonne undertake cooperative virtual engine design, control project

Internal combustion engines are poised for dramatic breakthroughs in improving efficiency with lower emissions, thanks in part to low-temperature combustion regimes. Such regimes show great efficiency and emissions potential, but they present optimization and control challenges that must be addressed before they enter the engine mainstream.

June 30, 2014
Argonne recognized with 2014 Best Diversity Company award

The readers of Diversity/Careers in Engineering & Information Technology have recognized Argonne National Laboratory as a 2014 Best Diversity Company.

June 25, 2014
The Ohio State University took home the overall winners title at the EcoCAR 2: Plugging In to the Future finals last week. EcoCAR 2 was a three-year competition managed by Argonne National Laboratory and sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, General Motors and 30 other government and industry leaders. Click to enlarge.
The Ohio State wins North American EcoCAR 2 competition

The Ohio State University took home the overall winners title at the EcoCAR 2: Plugging In to the Future finals, said competition sponsors the U.S. Department of Energy and General Motors Co. last week.

June 20, 2014
This figure shows a model of the interface between an electrolyte (gray, above) and an electrode (the crystal structure, below) inside a lithium battery.  Scientists at the Center for Electrochemical Energy Science, an Energy Frontier Research Center recently awarded four more years of funding by the U.S. Department of Energy, are working to understand the fundamental science that happens inside battery systems so that we can build better batteries. Figure courtesy Paul Fenter/Argonne National Laboratory. Click to enlarge.
Argonne named in several DOE Energy Frontier Research Center awards

The US Department of Energy announced June 18, 2014, that it is funding a total of $100 million in 32 Energy Frontier Research Centers, including one at Argonne and several more in which Argonne will closely partner with other national laboratories and universities.

June 19, 2014
We live atop the thinnest layer of the Earth: the crust. Below is the mantle (red), outer core (orange), and finally inner core (yellow-white). The lower portion of the mantle is the largest layer – stretching from 400 to 1,800 miles below the surface. Research at Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source recently suggested the makeup of the lower mantle is significantly different from what was previously thought. Image by Johan Swanepoel/Shutterstock. Click to enlarge.
Composition of Earth’s mantle revisited thanks to research at Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source

Research published last week in Science suggested that the makeup of the Earth’s lower mantle, which makes up the largest part of the Earth by volume, is significantly different than previously thought.

June 17, 2014