Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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The Electrocatalysis Consortium (ElectroCat) is using national lab resources and capabilities such as Argonne National Lab's High-Throughput Research facility (pictured) and Los Alamos National Lab's multiscale modeling techniques to develop catalysts and test their performance in fuel cells, speeding the process of discovery.
Argonne and Los Alamos National Laboratories Team Up To Develop More Affordable Fuel Cell Components

Researchers at Argonne and Los Alamos national laboratories have teamed up to support a DOE initiative through the creation of the Electrocatalysis Consortium (ElectroCat), a collaboration devoted to finding an effective but cheaper alternative to platinum in hydrogen fuel cells.

March 2, 2016
The antibiotic globomycin shuts down lipoprotein maturation by blocking the active site of the processing enzyme lipoprotein signal peptidase (LspA). Researchers hope their blueprint of LspA-globomycin will inform drug design so that analogues may be developed to fight a plethora of common but devastating infections.
Scientists blueprint antimicrobial candidate with promise in stemming the onrushing post-antibiotic tide

Researchers hope their blueprint of LspA-globomycin will inform drug design so that analogues may be developed to fight a plethora of common but devastating infections.

February 18, 2016
Argonne is working with Achates Power and Delphi Automotive to develop an advanced engine that could yield efficiency gains of up to 50 percent. This illustration shows how such an engine operates, with opposed pistons moving toward each other, compressing gasoline until it auto-ignites. Illustration courtesy of Achates Power
Argonne, Achates Power and Delphi Automotive to investigate new approach to engines

Argonne National Laboratory is working with Achates Power, Inc., and Delphi Automotive to develop an innovative new engine that could yield efficiency gains of up to 50 percent over a comparable conventional engine.

February 15, 2016
Here are “stills” from an X-ray “movie" of an exploding nanoparticle. The nanoparticle is superheated with an intense optical pulse and subsequently explodes (left). A series of ultrafast X-ray diffraction images (right) maps the process and contains information how the explosion starts with surface softening and proceeds from the outside in.
Scientists take nanoparticle snapshots

An international team of researchers led by Christoph Bostedt of Argonne and Tais Gorkhover of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory used two special lasers to observe the dynamics of a small sample of xenon as it was heated to a plasma.

February 10, 2016
Researchers will use an ARPA-E award to construct data sets to model electric grids representing several regions. They will use information about population density, land usage and industrial and commercial energy consumption patterns to estimate demand for electricity in a city or region. Also included will be information about where transmission lines are connected, the electrical properties of those lines, where generators are located and what their capabilities are.
Research projects will help optimize grid

Argonne will participate in three projects that recently received multiyear, multimillion-dollar awards from DOE’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy to develop new computer algorithms to optimize the grid and to develop accurate models on which to test those algorithms.

January 27, 2016
Comparison between experimental and calculated strain distributions in the hydrogen-poor phase. The strains are consistent with a trapped hydrogen-rich surface layer. Middle: Comparison between experimental and calculated strain distributions in the hydrogen-rich phase. The strains are dominated by elastic effects. Right: The time correlations in the displacement field that show evidence of aging and avalanching during the phase transformation.
Hydrogen uptake causes molecular “avalanches” in palladium

Unlike any other element, palladium takes up hydrogen at room temperature and pressure. Argonne scientists have gained new insight into how this uptake of hydrogen occurs, realized how it impacts the atomic structure of the palladium, and identified key properties of how this form of hydrogen storage could work in the future.

January 26, 2016
"Modernizing the U.S. electrical grid is essential to reducing carbon emissions, creating safeguards against attacks on our infrastructure, and keeping the lights on," said Secretary Moniz.
Argonne to lead 8 DOE Grid Modernization Projects

Argonne National Laboratory will receive about $19 million in funding and will lead eight projects as part of the Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium announced earlier today by the U.S. Department of Energy. Argonne will also participate as a partner in 23 other projects.

January 14, 2016
Using the supercomputing resources at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, University of Chicago and Argonne researchers have found a way miniaturize microchip components using a technique producing zero defects. This advance will allow semiconductor manufacturers to meet miniaturization target dates to produce smaller components with added functionality for our favorite devices.
Annihilating nanoscale defects

Researchers at the University of Chicago and Argonne may have found a way for the semiconductor industry to hit miniaturization targets on time and without defects.

January 12, 2016
A team of Argonne researchers (from left, Khalil Amine, Jun Lu, Larry Curtiss, Zonghai Chen, Kah Chun Lau, and Hsien-Hau Wang) have developed a way to create stable lithium superoxide in a lithium-air battery system.
Stable "superoxide" opens the door to a new class of batteries

Argonne scientists, working with American and Korean collaborators, produced stable crystallized lithium superoxide during battery discharging. Unlike lithium peroxide, this superoxide can easily dissociate into lithium and oxygen, leading to high efficiency and good cycle life in lithium-air batteries.

January 12, 2016
This image shows an atomic-resolution topographic rendering of the borophene surface, taken in the scanning tunneling microscope. The borophene sheet forms large buckled wrinkles, as seen in the center, in response to the underlying silver crystal. These atomic scale wrinkles may serve to steer the flow of electrons and could lead to other surprising properties. (Click to view larger.)
Scientists create atomically thin metallic boron

A team of scientists at Argonne, Northwestern University and Stony Brook University has, for the first time, created a two-dimensional sheet of boron – a material known as borophene.

December 21, 2015