Press Releases

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Argonne researcher Jim Sevik tightens the fuel rail on a natural gas direct-injection system at the lab. The engine is an automotive size single-cylinder research engine that operates with gasoline as well as natural gas. (Click to view larger.)
Argonne working with Ford and FCA US to study dual-fuel vehicles

It’s not as challenging as mixing oil and water, but scientists at Argonne are partnering with industry to study a tricky fuel mixing problem that could lead to more efficient engines.

July 9, 2015
In collaboration with the farming community of the Indian Creek Watershed in central Illinois, Argonne researchers are finding ways to simultaneously meet three objectives: maximize a farmer’s production, grow feedstock for bioenergy and protect the environment. Photo courtesy Patty Campbell; click to view larger.
Scientists study ways to integrate biofuels and food crops on farms

Scientists from Argonne are designing ways to improve—and hopefully optimize—land use. In collaboration with the farming community of the Indian Creek Watershed in central Illinois, these researchers are finding ways to simultaneously meet three objectives: maximize a farmer’s production, grow feedstock for bioenergy and protect the environment.

July 7, 2015
Argonne materials scientist Charudatta Phatak will receive $100,000 over three years for his proposal to develop an electric field map representing the electrode-electrolyte interface. (Click image to view larger.)
Early career scientist Charudatta Phatak wins energy research award

Charudatta Phatak, an assistant materials scientist at Argonne, has received the 2015-16 NU-Argonne Early Career Investigator Award for Energy Research.

July 6, 2015
An Argonne study found that gasoline and diesel refined from Canadian oil sands have a higher carbon impact than fuels derived from conventional domestic crude sources.
Argonne analysis shows increased carbon intensity from Canadian oil sands

Argonne National Laboratory this week released a study that shows gasoline and diesel refined from Canadian oil sands have a higher carbon impact than fuels derived from conventional domestic crude sources.

June 25, 2015
The 3D X-ray imaging technique used in the study shows how the defects move around inside the LNMO spinel as the battery is charged to higher voltages. (Image courtesy of Andrew Ulvestad/Department of Physics, Jacobs School of Engineering/UC San Diego; click to view larger.)
X-ray imaging reveals secrets in battery materials

In a new study, researchers explain why one particular cathode material works well at high voltages, while most other cathodes do not. The insights could help battery developers design rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that operate at higher voltages.

June 22, 2015
Supratik Guha has been named the next director of the Nanoscience and Technology Division at Argonne National Laboratory, as well as director of Argonne’s Center for Nanoscale Materials. (Click image to view larger.)
Supratik Guha to direct nanoscience and technology at Argonne National Laboratory

Supratik Guha has been named the next director of the Nanoscience and Technology Division at Argonne National Laboratory, as well as director of Argonne’s Center for Nanoscale Materials.

June 18, 2015
Chemist Amanda Youker operates a remote manipulator arm in a radiation-shielded cell. The cell is used for the purification of molybdenum-99 in a process recently demonstrated by Argonne that could lead to a domestic source of the important medical isotope. (Photo by Wes Agresta; click to view larger).
Argonne confirms new commercial method for producing medical isotope

Argonne National Laboratory recently teamed with SHINE Medical Technologies to demonstrate the production, separation and purification of a critical medical radioisotope that is used in millions of medical procedures each year, but is not produced domestically.

June 15, 2015
From left to right: Argonne researchers Wanjun Jiang, Suzanne G.E. te Velthuis, and Axel Hoffman published a new way to make magnetic skyrmion bubbles at room temperature. Photo by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory. (Click image to view larger.)
Argonne scientists announce first room-temperature magnetic skyrmion bubbles

Researchers at UCLA and Argonne announced today a new method for creating magnetic skyrmion bubbles at room temperature. The bubbles, a physics phenomenon thought to be an option for more energy-efficient and compact electronics, can be created with simple equipment and common materials.

June 12, 2015
Argonne Associate Laboratory Director for Energy and Global Security Mark Peters, left, signs a memorandum of understanding with Nadya Bliss, director of the Global Security Initiative at Arizona State University. The MOU will facilitate a broad portfolio of research shared between the two institutions. (Photo by Wes Agresta; click to view larger.)
Argonne and Arizona State University sign five-year agreement

Argonne National Laboratory recently signed an agreement with Arizona State University that will facilitate a broad portfolio of research shared between the two institutions.

May 28, 2015
From left, researchers Ani Sumant, Ali Erdemir, Subramanian Sankaranarayanan, Sanket Deshmukh, and Diana Berman combined diamond, graphene, and carbon to achieve superlubricity. (Click image to view larger.)
Slip sliding away: Graphene and diamonds prove a slippery combination

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory have found a way to use tiny diamonds and graphene to give friction the slip, creating a new material combination that demonstrates the rare phenomenon of “superlubricity.”

May 22, 2015