Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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Nanoscientist Anirudha Sumant received a 2017 TechConnect National Innovation Award for a method that significantly cuts the time and cost needed to grow graphene. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne-developed technology for producing graphene wins TechConnect National Innovation Award

A method that significantly cuts the time and cost needed to grow graphene has won a 2017 TechConnect National Innovation Award. This is the second year in a row that a team at Argonne’s Center for Nanoscale Materials has received this award.

June 8, 2017
Honeywell UOP will examine new materials for converting natural gas to liquid fuels with a synthesis technique called atomic layer deposition. Here, an Argonne researcher prepares to synthesize catalysts using atomic layer deposition. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Honeywell UOP and Argonne seek research collaborations in catalysis under Technologist In Residence program

Researchers at Argonne are collaborating with Honeywell UOP scientists to explore innovative energy and chemicals production.

June 6, 2017
Argonne chemists Dugan Hayes, Lin Chen, and Ryan Hadt have identified a rapid electronic process that could aid the water-splitting reaction in cobalt-containing catalysts.  Cobalt catalysts are relatively inexpensive and could replace more expensive precious metal catalysts in the production of clean energy, most notably solar fuels. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Chemical “dance” of cobalt catalysis could pave way to solar fuels

In a new study, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and Harvard University have been able to see for the first time an especially important chemical step in the process of splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen – the basic reaction at the heart of creating entirely renewable fuels from solar energy.

June 2, 2017
Argonne will work with ThermoAura Inc., of Colonie, NY, to improve the performance of commercially manufactured thermoelectric materials, one of seven new partnerships announced through the Department of Energy’s Small Business Voucher program. Higher performing thermoelectrics could improve the efficiency of air conditioning systems. (Image by Shutterstock/Artur Bogacki)
Seven small businesses to collaborate with Argonne to solve technical challenges

Seven small businesses have been selected to collaborate with researchers at Argonne to address technical challenges as part of DOE’s Small Business Vouchers Program.

May 31, 2017
Argonne chemist Max Delferro has developed an unusually active form of vanadium for hydrogenation reactions.  Vanadium an inexpensive common metal that could replace some of the precious metals currently found in catalysts used in these reactions, frequently used in processing of petrochemicals. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne scientists make vanadium into a useful catalyst for hydrogenation

In a new study, Argonne chemist Max Delferro boosted and analyzed the unprecedented catalytic activity of an element called vanadium for hydrogenation – a reaction that is used for making everything from vegetable oils to petrochemical products to vitamins.

May 25, 2017
Argonne materials scientist Andrew Ulvestad examines a sample at Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Special X-ray technique allows scientists to see 3-D deformations

In a new study published last Friday in Science, researchers at Argonne used an X-ray scattering technique called Bragg coherent diffraction imaging to reconstruct in 3-D the size and shape of grain defects. These defects create imperfections in the lattice of atoms inside a grain that can give rise to interesting material properties and effects.

May 23, 2017
More than 400 scientific users of the Advanced Photon Source and Center for Nanoscale Materials, above, start their annual meeting today at Argonne. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne welcomes scientists to Advanced Photon Source and Center for Nanoscale Materials

More than 400 researchers from numerous disciplines will convene at Argonne today for the annual Users’ Meeting for the Advanced Photon Source and Center for Nanoscale Materials.

May 8, 2017
Two Argonne physicists offered a way to mathematically describe a particular physics phenomenon called a phase transition in a system out of equilibrium (that is, with energy moving through it) by using imaginary numbers. The illustration relates the phase transition to the change between mathematical Mobius transformations (a, b, and c). The theory of out-of-equilibrium physics is a long-sought goal in the field, and could eventually help us design better electronics. (Image courtesy of Vinokur/Galda/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Study offers new theoretical approach to describing non-equilibrium phase transitions

Two physicists at Argonne offered a way to mathematically describe a particular physics phenomenon called a phase transition in a system out of equilibrium. Such phenomena are central in physics, and understanding how they occur has been a long-held and vexing goal; their behavior and related effects are key to unlocking possibilities for new electronics and other next-generation technologies.

April 26, 2017
A representation of the structure of a protein from the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, which causes foodborne illness, with an inhibitor molecule bound. (Image by Lizbeth Hedstrom (Brandeis University)/University of Chicago/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Battling infectious diseases with 3-D protein structures

A team of scientists used the Advanced Photon Source to find the 3-D structures of more than 1,000 proteins to be used for drug and vaccine research.

April 25, 2017
When manganese ions (gray) are stripped out of a battery’s cathode (blue), they can react with the battery’s electrolyte near the anode (gold), trapping lithium ions (green/yellow). (Image by Robert Horn/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Scientists identify chemical causes of battery “capacity fade”

Researchers at Argonne identified one of the major culprits in capacity fade of high-energy lithium-ion batteries.

April 25, 2017