Argonne National Laboratory

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Scientists have used a new X-ray diffraction technique called Bragg single-angle ptychography to get a clear picture of how planes of atoms shift and squeeze under stress. (Image by Robert Horn/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Single-angle ptychography allows 3D imaging of stressed materials

Scientists have used a new X-ray diffraction technique called Bragg single-angle ptychography to get a clear picture of how planes of atoms shift and squeeze under stress.

March 21, 2017
Students from Stony Brook University visited Argonne with research professor Nils Feege to test a prototype of a magnetic cloak — a crucial piece of equipment for a next-generation particle collider — at Argonne’s 4-Tesla Magnet Facility. From left to right: Thomas Krahulik, Nils Feege, Rourke Sekelsky, Joshua LaBounty and Stacy Karthas. (Image by Nils Feege.)
A road trip to test a magnetic cloak at Argonne National Laboratory

In December, five students from Stony Brook University in New York and their research professor loaded a prototype of a magnetic cloak into an SUV and set off for Argonne National Laboratory, nearly 900 miles away.

February 24, 2017
In a new study, Argonne scientists have discovered a way to confine the behavior of electrons by using extremely high magnetic fields. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Electrons "puddle" under high magnetic fields, study reveals

In a new study, researchers used extremely high magnetic fields — equivalent to those found in the center of neutron stars — to alter electronic behavior. By observing the change in the behavior of these electrons, scientists may be able to gain an enriched understanding of material behavior.

January 3, 2017
Inside an engine is a harsh place: the intense heat and pressure cause the parts to wear away and break down. But this new coating, which rebuilds itself as soon as it begins to break down, could protect engine parts (and more) for much longer.
9 cool science & tech stories from Argonne in 2016

As 2016 draws to a close, we’re looking back at just a few of the many cool stories that came out of research conducted by Argonne scientists and engineers this year. These discoveries are just a tiny sample of how Argonne researchers help address energy challenges, boost the economy through new discoveries and technologies, and expand scientific knowledge.

December 22, 2016
This image of a quasicrystal lattice shows the unique symmetric but never repeating pattern of its components.  The colors correspond to the orientation of the magnetic polarization of each edge. (Image by Amanda Petford-Long, Argonne National Laboratory.)
Energy cascades in quasicrystals trigger an avalanche of discovery

In a new study from Argonne National Laboratory, scientists looked at networks of magnetic material patterned into the unique and quite beautiful geometries of quasi-crystals to see how the nature of the non-repeating patterns lead to the emergence of unusual energetic effects.

December 12, 2016
The Argonne research team that has pioneered the use of machine learning tools in 2-D material modeling. (Image by Wes Agresta/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Machine learning enables predictive modeling of 2-D materials

In a study published in The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, a team of researchers led by Argonne computational scientist Subramanian Sankaranarayanan described their use of machine learning tools to create the first atomic-level model that accurately predicts the thermal properties of stanene, a 2-D material made up of a one-atom-thick sheet of tin.

December 7, 2016
Cooling technique helps researchers “target” a major component for a new collider

Researchers at Argonne have recently developed a new ultra-low-friction sliding contact mechanism that uses chilled water to remove heat from a key component of a next-generation collider.

December 2, 2016
Argonne scientists Ivan Sadovskyy (left) and Valerii Vinokur published a paper showing a mathematical construction to a possible local violation of the Second Law of the Thermodynamics. One implication for the research could be a way to one day remotely power a device — that is, the energy expended to light the lamp could take place anywhere. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne researchers posit way to locally circumvent Second Law of Thermodynamics

For more than a century and a half of physics, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, which states that entropy always increases, has been as close to inviolable as any law we know. In this universe, chaos reigns supreme. But Argonne researchers announced recently that they may have discovered a little loophole in this famous maxim.

October 19, 2016
Building project managers and scientific leads confer at the site of a new clean room under construction at Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the lab will enable scientists and engineers to build extremely sensitive detectors — such as those capable of detecting light from the early days of the universe. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Building a room clean enough to make sensors to find light from the birth of the universe

Work is underway at Argonne on an expansion of its “clean room.” The new lab will be specially suited for building parts for ultra-sensitive detectors — such as those to carry out improved X-ray research, or for the South Pole Telescope to search for light from the early days of the universe.

October 17, 2016
SUE the Dinosaur’s forearm came to the Advanced Photon Source for its most detailed scan ever, which could shed light on why the large dinosaur had such small arms. (Image courtesy Field Museum)
Why did T. rex have such small arms? SUE arrives at Advanced Photon Source for its most detailed scan ever

SUE the Dinosaur’s forearm came to the Advanced Photon Source for its most detailed scan ever, which could shed light on why the large dinosaur had such small arms.

October 12, 2016