Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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A <em>Nature</em> study describes how Argonne and collaborating institutions helped develop a new way of converting methane to methanol using rhodium-based catalysts. (Image courtesy of Shutterstock/hkhtt hj.)
Making fuel out of thick air

In a new study, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, Tufts University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory teamed up to explore the potential of rhodium-based catalysts for this conversion under milder conditions.

December 7, 2017
Baris Key, assistant chemist (left) and Hao Wang, postdoctoral researcher (right) prepare an experiment in Argonne’s Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) laboratory. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
“Holy Grail” for batteries: Solid-state magnesium battery a big step closer

A team of Department of Energy (DOE) scientists at the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR) has discovered the fastest magnesium-ion solid-state conductor, a major step towards making solid-state magnesium-ion batteries that are both energy dense and safe.

November 28, 2017
A team led by Argonne-based researcher Jacqui Cole has reported an advance in smart window technology that could enable cities to move closer to the goal of being energy sustainable. (Image credit: cybrain/ Shutterstock.)
Solar cell discovery opens a new window to powering tomorrow’s cities

Windows that generate electricity may have a clearer path to prominent roles in buildings of the future due to an Argonne-led discovery.

November 22, 2017
Argonne’s Karen Mulfort will accept the American Chemical Society’s 2017 Rising Star award at its national meeting in March 2018. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Catch a rising science star

Karen Mulfort, a chemist at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, was named a 2017 Rising Star by the Women Chemists Committee (WCC) of the American Chemical Society.

October 30, 2017
Four Argonne researchers appointed fellows of scientific societies

A select group of scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory has been honored as fellows of the American Physical Society and the Electrochemical Society. Physicists Kawtar Hafidi and Michael Carpenter have been appointed as American Physical Society fellows and Materials Scientist Khalil Amine and Chemist Chris Johnson have been elected as Electrochemical Society fellows.

October 20, 2017
DOE Secretary Rick Perry awarded Argonne with nearly $4.7 million for nine projects in three divisions. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Department of Energy awards flow into Argonne

DOE Secretary Rick Perry awarded Argonne with nearly $4.7 million in projects as part of the DOE’s Office of Technology Transition’s Technology Commercialization Fund (TCF) in September.

October 18, 2017
This shows the synthetic purple membrane assembly developed by Elena Rozhkova and fellow Argonne researchers. The assembly, which includes nanodiscs, titanium dioxide and platinum nanoparticles, can transform sunlight into hydrogen fuel. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Purple power: Synthetic ‘purple membranes’ transform sunlight to hydrogen fuel

Argonne researchers have found a new way to produce solar fuels by developing “synthetic purple membranes.” These membranes involve an assembly of lipid nanodiscs, man-made proteins, and semiconducting nanoparticles that, when taken together, can transform sunlight into hydrogen fuel.

October 12, 2017
“When scientists add or remove a proton (H+) from the perovskite (SmNiO3 (SNO)) lattice, the material’s atomic structure expands or contracts dramatically to accommodate it in a process called ‘lattice breathing,’” said Badri Narayanan, an Argonne assistant material scientist and co-author of the study. But when it happens repeatedly, this activity wanes, resembling human forgetfulness. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Forget about it

Inspired by human forgetfulness — how our brains discard unnecessary data to make room for new information — scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory and three universities, conducted a recent study that combined supercomputer simulation and X-ray characterization of a material that gradually “forgets.” This could one day be used for advanced bio-inspired computing.

October 10, 2017
Argonne Chemist Stephen Klippenstein has helped discover major chemical pathways that scientists can potentially exploit on a number of levels. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Discovery suggests new significance of unheralded chemical reactions

Argonne and Columbia researchers reveal new significance to a decades-old chemical reaction theory, increasing our understanding of the interaction of gases, relevant to combustion and planetary atmospheres.

August 29, 2017
Matt Dietrich is a physicist in Argonne’s Physics Division. His research into new physics beyond the Standard Model, which could provide clues as to why matter dominates our universe, earned him a 2017 DOE Early Career Research award. (Image courtesy of Matt Dietrich.)
Two Argonne scientists receive DOE Early Career Research Program awards

Argonne scientists Matt Dietrich and Tom Peterka have received DOE Early Career Research Program awards. Peterka was awarded for his work to redefine scientific data models to be communicated, stored and analyzed more efficiently. Dietrich was recognized for his work probing potential new physics beyond the Standard Model that could help explain why matter came to dominate the universe.

August 22, 2017