Argonne National Laboratory

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Matt Dietrich is a physicist in Argonne’s Physics Division. His research into new physics beyond the Standard Model, which could provide clues as to why matter dominates our universe, earned him a 2017 DOE Early Career Research award. (Image courtesy of Matt Dietrich.)
Two Argonne scientists receive DOE Early Career Research Program awards

Argonne scientists Matt Dietrich and Tom Peterka have received DOE Early Career Research Program awards. Peterka was awarded for his work to redefine scientific data models to be communicated, stored and analyzed more efficiently. Dietrich was recognized for his work probing potential new physics beyond the Standard Model that could help explain why matter came to dominate the universe.

August 22, 2017
Researchers at Argonne looked at the dynamics of the transport of certain elements – especially rubidium – at the interface between water and mica, a flat transparent mineral pictured above. (Image by Beth Harvey/Shutterstock.)
Mica provides clue to how water transports minerals

In a new study from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Delaware, chemists have been able to look at the interface between water and muscovite mica, a flat mineral commonly found in granite, soils and many sediments. In particular, the researchers looked at the capture and release of rubidium – a metal closely related to but more easily singled out than common elements like potassium and sodium.

July 13, 2017
Argonne, the University of Chicago and Fermilab are launching an intellectual hub called the Chicago Quantum Exchange to advance academic, industrial and governmental efforts in the science and engineering of quantum information. Above: An illustration of a blinking quantum dot in its 'on’ state. (Image courtesy of Nicholas Brawand).
Chicago Quantum Exchange to create technologically transformative ecosystem

The University of Chicago is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to launch an intellectual hub for advancing academic, industrial and governmental efforts in the science and engineering of quantum information.

June 20, 2017
Materials scientists at Argonne National Laboratory synthesized single crystals of a metallic trilayer nickelate compound, which shows similarities to a technologically valuable class of materials called high-temperature superconductors – and with the right ingredients, could potentially become one. Above: The crystal structure of such a compound. (Image credit: Zhang et. al, published in <em>Nature Physics</em>.)
Nickel for thought: Compound shows potential for high-temperature superconductivity

Argonne researchers have identified a nickel oxide compound as an unconventional but promising candidate material for high-temperature superconductivity. The project combined crystal growth, X-ray spectroscopy and computational theory.

June 16, 2017
Cynthia Jenks will lead Argonne’s Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division.
Cynthia Jenks named director of Argonne’s Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

Argonne has named Cynthia Jenks the next director of the laboratory’s Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division. Jenks currently serves as the assistant director for scientific planning and the director of the Chemical and Biological Sciences Division at Ames Laboratory.

June 8, 2017
A team of researchers, including several physicists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory, discovered that a molecule containing a large atom could act like a molecular “black hole” when exposed to ultrafast laser pulses, sucking in electrons from nearby lighter atoms.  (Image courtesy of DESY). (Image courtesy of DESY.)
The world’s most powerful X-ray laser beam creates ‘molecular black hole’

With the most highly focused power of the world’s most powerful X-ray laser, scientists from a number of institutions around the world – including Argonne National Laboratory – have conducted a new experiment that takes apart molecules electron by electron.

June 8, 2017
Honeywell UOP will examine new materials for converting natural gas to liquid fuels with a synthesis technique called atomic layer deposition. Here, an Argonne researcher prepares to synthesize catalysts using atomic layer deposition. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Honeywell UOP and Argonne seek research collaborations in catalysis under Technologist In Residence program

Researchers at Argonne are collaborating with Honeywell UOP scientists to explore innovative energy and chemicals production.

June 6, 2017
Argonne chemists Dugan Hayes, Lin Chen, and Ryan Hadt have identified a rapid electronic process that could aid the water-splitting reaction in cobalt-containing catalysts.  Cobalt catalysts are relatively inexpensive and could replace more expensive precious metal catalysts in the production of clean energy, most notably solar fuels. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Chemical “dance” of cobalt catalysis could pave way to solar fuels

In a new study, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and Harvard University have been able to see for the first time an especially important chemical step in the process of splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen – the basic reaction at the heart of creating entirely renewable fuels from solar energy.

June 2, 2017
Argonne will work with ThermoAura Inc., of Colonie, NY, to improve the performance of commercially manufactured thermoelectric materials, one of seven new partnerships announced through the Department of Energy’s Small Business Voucher program. Higher performing thermoelectrics could improve the efficiency of air conditioning systems. (Image by Shutterstock/Artur Bogacki)
Seven small businesses to collaborate with Argonne to solve technical challenges

Seven small businesses have been selected to collaborate with researchers at Argonne to address technical challenges as part of DOE’s Small Business Vouchers Program.

May 31, 2017
Argonne chemist Max Delferro has developed an unusually active form of vanadium for hydrogenation reactions.  Vanadium an inexpensive common metal that could replace some of the precious metals currently found in catalysts used in these reactions, frequently used in processing of petrochemicals. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne scientists make vanadium into a useful catalyst for hydrogenation

In a new study, Argonne chemist Max Delferro boosted and analyzed the unprecedented catalytic activity of an element called vanadium for hydrogenation – a reaction that is used for making everything from vegetable oils to petrochemical products to vitamins.

May 25, 2017